BBC presenter Jonathan Ross joins Xbox Games Division


Could this man help Microsoft dominate the gaming industry?

British TV personality Jonathan Ross has been recruited by Microsoft as an Xbox Games Division executive producer.

Microsoft corporate vice president Phil Harrison made the announcement at a gathering in London last night, MCV reports.

Ross is an enthusiastic supporter of the gaming industry, appearing as a UNSC marine in Halo in 2007 and voicing Barry Hatch in Fable III in 2010. He also owns production company Hotsauce which released Catcha Catcha Aliens! on Android and iOS earlier this year.

Harrison says the BBC presenter could offer a different perspective and innovative ideas in the competitive multi-billion dollar gaming industry.

"We wanted to bring in new talent that would challenge the way we build games and the way we think about what an audience is and what is entertainment," he says.

"We want to broaden the concept of gaming to maybe blur the distinctions about what is a traditional game and what is a traditional television programme and what is a traditional linear media. These devices and boxes now allow us to do that in a really meaningful way," Harrison adds.

Microsoft Studio Lift London boss Lee Schuneman says Ross can incorporate elements of TV that will enhance the gaming experience.

“What I've really appreciated is this authenticity and passion and real understanding for what we are as gamers, and the cool films and toys we like. Our ambition is to create these new experiences that join TV and gaming together."

Source: MCV | Image via The Guardian

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21 Comments

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I'm british and I really don't see what talent Jonathan Ross has to offer to the Xbox brand.
His Mrs seems better qualified (Kick-Ass, Kick-Ass II)!

He is a very good "door in". He is known to be one of those people who is at every party worth going to, rubbing shoulders with everyone worth knowing.

Sounds interesting I guess... I guess we'll have to wait and see if he can produce some nice gaming ideas for Xbox.

so basically he's just a brand ambassador and will plug the xbox one on his talk show regularly. I hate it when companies hire people pretend that they are going to be in charge of some important things when actually they are just using their name and having them go to parties and get their photo taken.

torrentthief said,

so basically he's just a brand ambassador and will plug
the xbox one on his talk show regularly.


Actually he won't, because broadcasting regulations in the UK expressly forbid it. Certain rules over
commercial sponsorship of TV shows here were relaxed to some extent, whereby a product or a
company logo can be seen on the set, or a product/service can be briefly mentioned, and there
are still short sponsor credits going in and out of ad-breaks in the form of mini-ads.

A sponsor is still strictly not allowed to influence the editorial content of any show on any of our
commercial TV channels. If Jonathan Ross frequently mentioned Xbox on his chat show, Ofcom
could take action against the show, his production company and/or ITV, including fines.

BBC TV shows are still not allowed to directly carry any form of advertising or sponsorship.

DJGM said,

Actually he won't, because broadcasting regulations in the UK expressly forbid it. Certain rules over
commercial sponsorship of TV shows here were relaxed to some extent, whereby a product or a
company logo can be seen on the set, or a product/service can be briefly mentioned, and there
are still short sponsor credits going in and out of ad-breaks in the form of mini-ads.

A sponsor is still strictly not allowed to influence the editorial content of any show on any of our
commercial TV channels. If Jonathan Ross frequently mentioned Xbox on his chat show, Ofcom
could take action against the show, his production company and/or ITV, including fines.

BBC TV shows are still not allowed to directly carry any form of advertising or sponsorship.

I knew this of the BBC but since he now presents on ITV I'm not sure its quite the same? I mean I just googled "Jonathan Ross Show" to make sure it was ITV and it comes up with....

The Jonathan Ross Show - Sponsored by Renault - Renault.co.uk‎
http://www.renault.co.uk/JonathanRoss

I know that's not strictly TV but surely this could fall under the same category?

DJGM said,

Actually he won't, because broadcasting regulations in the UK expressly forbid it. Certain rules over
commercial sponsorship of TV shows here were relaxed to some extent, whereby a product or a
company logo can be seen on the set, or a product/service can be briefly mentioned, and there
are still short sponsor credits going in and out of ad-breaks in the form of mini-ads.

A sponsor is still strictly not allowed to influence the editorial content of any show on any of our
commercial TV channels. If Jonathan Ross frequently mentioned Xbox on his chat show, Ofcom
could take action against the show, his production company and/or ITV, including fines.

BBC TV shows are still not allowed to directly carry any form of advertising or sponsorship.

not true, ofcom has allowed product placement since feb 2011: http://media.ofcom.org.uk/2011...-to-be-shown-on-tv-screens/

DJGM said,

Actually he won't, because broadcasting regulations in the UK expressly forbid it. Certain rules over
commercial sponsorship of TV shows here were relaxed to some extent, whereby a product or a
company logo can be seen on the set, or a product/service can be briefly mentioned, and there
are still short sponsor credits going in and out of ad-breaks in the form of mini-ads.

A sponsor is still strictly not allowed to influence the editorial content of any show on any of our
commercial TV channels. If Jonathan Ross frequently mentioned Xbox on his chat show, Ofcom
could take action against the show, his production company and/or ITV, including fines.

BBC TV shows are still not allowed to directly carry any form of advertising or sponsorship.

He's on iTV now - they can do as they please and pay off the occasional fine for bad advertising practices as and when required. They get the ratings through positive or negative press.

torrentthief said,

not true, ofcom has allowed product placement since feb 2011: http://media.ofcom.org.uk/2011...-to-be-shown-on-tv-screens/


I know very product placement is allowed, hence why I said the following earlier . . .

"Certain rules over commercial sponsorship of TV shows here were relaxed to
some extent, whereby a product or a company logo can be seen on the set,
or a product/service can be briefly mentioned."

Product placement must be subtle, and not placed where it takes precedence over anything else.
Like with the Nationwide cash machine installed in Dev Alahan's corner shop on Corrie, it's seen
in the background and occasionally used, but there would never be a scene where someone
comes in to discusses Nationwide's mortgages and current accounts, as that isn't allowed.

Aergan said,

He's on iTV now - they can do as they please and pay off the occasional fine for bad advertising practices as and when required. They get the ratings through positive or negative press.


No they can't do as they please. Repeated rule breaking, and they wouldn't just be fined
by Ofcom, they could also run the risk of having their broadcasting licence revoked.


Your point being ... ?

Just because Ofcom have increased the maximum amount they can fine ITV for breaches of
broadcasting regulations, it doesn't mean they can't revoke (or at least threaten to revoke)
their broadcasting licence if ITV (or any of its shows) were to repeatedly commit serious
breaches of broadcasting regulations, not just over product placement.

Although, if an ITV show were to break the rules on more than one occasion, that show
would most likely be axed by ITV bosses at the first available opportunity.

skiver said,

I knew this of the BBC but since he now presents on ITV I'm not sure its quite the same? I mean I just googled "Jonathan Ross Show" to make sure it was ITV and it comes up with....

The Jonathan Ross Show - Sponsored by Renault - Renault.co.uk‎
http://www.renault.co.uk/JonathanRoss

I know that's not strictly TV but surely this could fall under the same category?


Yes, Renault sponsor the show, and there are Renault sponsor credits before the opening titles,
going into and coming out of ad-breaks during the show, and finally after the end credits.

Renault UK have a section on their website that reflects this, but they don't have any editorial
influence on the content of the show. If Renault UK's CEO was a guest on the show, there to
specifically discuss the merits of their cars, that wouldn't be allowed to be broadcast.

A similar example was earlier this year, when Morrisons (UK based supermarket retail chain)
sponsored "Ant & Dec's Saturday Night Takeaway" on ITV there was a section of Morrisons
website that promoted this. Ant and Dec even featured in a series of TV ads for Morrisons,
but the company never had any editiorial presence or influence over the show's content.