Bing has 360 degree panorama front page for Windows 8 launch

With today's official launch of Windows 8, Microsoft's Bing search division decided to do something a little different for its daily photograph for its Bing.com front page. The page has a photo of the Saxon Switzerland National Park located, oddly, in Germany. However, instead of a simple static image, users can rotate the picture 360 degrees to see all of the spectacular location.

In a post on the Bing.com blog, Microsoft says, "Those of you who have Windows 8 can explore the homepage with touch - allowing you to zoom, pinch and swipe as you explore the image. And those of you who don’t have Windows 8 quite yet can check it out from any modern browser that is HTML5 capable, exploring the image with your mouse."

Of course, Bing and Windows 8 have lots of links already. Bing is naturally the default search engine for Windows 8 users and the Bing team have created lots of Windows 8 "Modern" apps such as News, Maps. Travel, Finance and more. Microsoft released these apps as part of pre-release versions of Windows 8 and have been busy updating them in the last few weeks for the final version of the OS

Source: Bing.com | Image via Microsoft

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I don't have Windows 8, but do have IE9. This doesn't work in IE9 but does work in Chrome 22 (22 already? Wow ...) and Firefox 12. You hear that? IT DOESN'T WORK IN IE9 BUT WORKS IN THE TOP COMPETING BROWSERS!

Love ya, MS, but that's just embarrassing ...

tytytucke said,
loads slowly like their maps in pieces. Why not just have one large panorama picture?
Its to choppy as it is.

It's a Photosynth. Photosynth is based on Deep zoom, which is an interesting technology. Read up on it, and your questions shall be answered.

Those of you who have Windows 8 can explore the homepage with touch...

I have Windows 8 and I am touching my monitor but nothing is happening. /s

works on chrome but not on IE... I don't know why. But I cant be using chrome. just installed it today to compare the speed with IE... and its slower. Will install firefox and remove chrome and opera.

benalvino said,
works on chrome but not on IE... I don't know why. But I cant be using chrome. just installed it today to compare the speed with IE... and its slower. Will install firefox and remove chrome and opera.

Chrome is faster than Firefox. While I am not a Microsoft hater, I cannot justify moving back to IE until they prove a faster upgrade cycle (rather than every few years), and plug-in support like Firefox and Chrome (specifically AdBlock and FlashBlock to avoid malware injections through weak ad networks).

pickypg said,

Chrome is faster than Firefox. While I am not a Microsoft hater, I cannot justify moving back to IE until they prove a faster upgrade cycle (rather than every few years), and plug-in support like Firefox and Chrome (specifically AdBlock and FlashBlock to avoid malware injections through weak ad networks).


Hmm funny, several things there matey.
Whats wrong with the upgrade cycle? How it has been since IE7-8 is fine. The web does not need to be under constant change. It needs breaks, pauzes and quiet times. So developers can rest and get settled with standards you know will still be there in a year. Instead of just hoping W3 standards do not change enough and hoping Firefox/Chrome follow the standards properly (they often do not).
Also for Firefox/Chrome you need a plugin to block those 'malware' infested ads. Funny, this sorta thing comes build-in with IE since IE7. And is self-learning and easy to use, turn it on and slowly but surely see the ads melt away everywhere the more you use it.

And some bonus info, Firefox and Chrome have more serious security exploits then IE has had since IE8. And on top of that if you can get to use IE10, no other browser has such a strong security around it that for now it remains unexploited (do not count the flash exploit on the desktop browser, desktop browser has half the security measurements disabled.)

Shadowzz said,

Hmm funny, several things there matey.
Whats wrong with the upgrade cycle? How it has been since IE7-8 is fine. The web does not need to be under constant change. It needs breaks, pauzes and quiet times. So developers can rest and get settled with standards you know will still be there in a year. Instead of just hoping W3 standards do not change enough and hoping Firefox/Chrome follow the standards properly (they often do not).
Also for Firefox/Chrome you need a plugin to block those 'malware' infested ads. Funny, this sorta thing comes build-in with IE since IE7. And is self-learning and easy to use, turn it on and slowly but surely see the ads melt away everywhere the more you use it.

And some bonus info, Firefox and Chrome have more serious security exploits then IE has had since IE8. And on top of that if you can get to use IE10, no other browser has such a strong security around it that for now it remains unexploited (do not count the flash exploit on the desktop browser, desktop browser has half the security measurements disabled.)

Okay, I am a developer, and I develop for both client and the web. IE 6 and IE7 are thankfully not worth talking about anymore, and IE8 is garbage.

IE10 is the first browser from Microsoft that is worth really considering. Even IE9 is missing some rather no-brainer features, like placeholder text. That does not help developers with standardizing; that is settling. IE9 is incredibly quick, and it renders what it does support very well, but what it does support is still limited compared to the competition. In fact, suggesting that settling for a browser's features enables standardization is the worst form of standardizing. Its unpredictable quirks, and its shortcomings are not standards. Documented features, like AJAX support and CSS (IE9 really caught up a lot of ground here, even surpassing a few WebKit2 features) are standards. If for no other reason, because the very next version of the browser means that at least something will break.

I actually prefer IE9 to Firefox, but Chrome has a similar sandboxing security model to IE, and by disabling ads, flash, and Java, I'm incredibly safe. IE has no way to disable Flash from page-to-page like the plug-ins allow, nor does it provide a way to block ads, Flash or otherwise, from page-to-page. I do believe that IE10 has the strongest security out of the box, but that isn't going to stop the majority-browser from being targeted by its zero-day exploits the most (regardless whether it has the most or not), and those in the forcibly-integrated Flash plug-in (which Chrome included first, but, again, I can disable it through a plug-in, and re-enable it on the fly within the page).

I love Microsoft, and my Surface (even IE10 on it), but IE will continue to be the second choice, at best, until they push their commitment to supporting browser standards through more regular updates. To be clear, the point of standards is that they don't change, which means that I can develop it today, and the browser can be updated later, and it won't change my implementation. If the browser doesn't support it today, or for another two years, then I cannot implement it today without a nasty work-around in a lot of cases. As a nice example of an unbreaking standard, then go to imdb.com in both IE9 and IE10, and any other browser. Notice the search box? That's placeholder text. Notice it's not there in any IE before IE10?

To be clear, I'm not saying that IE needs to force people to realize that their browser is changing. There shouldn't be an IE11 in January, but the standards need to come much faster.

Edited by pickypg, Oct 27 2012, 7:47pm :

BBinder said,
not available in UK even same image is used, changing to united states still not able to view

Yeah, it was working all day in the UK for me; however, this article is a bit late for UK citizens to check it out, as it changed at midnight.