Bing shows off animated homepage and HTML5 browsing

Amongst all of the excitement with the launch of Internet Explorer 9 today, the Bing team made another presentation with the introduction of Bing in HTML5.

The updated search engine will answer back at Google's instant search results with their very own kind of search improvements, including taking the power of HTML5 and introducing it into their home page.

The new improvements will allow for an animated home page using the Canvas HTML5 tag. Bing demonstrated an animated beach home page, where the water crashes onto the beach, all without the use of additional plug-ins or video.

Neowin also showed off a preview video of the new Bing home page last week, with smooth transitions from the search page, to your actual results, all without reloading the page.

The video below shows just how the new Bing.com will work, with animated home pages, smooth transitions between the home page and your results, including hovering over tabs to show off content, to animated weather.

The new updated home page is expected to preview in a month, and expected to replace the existing home page within the next few months.

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I was watching them preview this at the keynote, the feature I was most impressed by that he hasn't made a point of here is that it had the same smooth transitions when using the back button. Can't wait for more of the web to look like this.

Wow this was pretty cool, I might switch to bing with all this. Exciting time to be a computer user, huh guys?

dotf said,

all of the animations use html5

HTML5 only provide structure. Animation is done with Javascript (or CSS3, but I don't think IE9 supports CSS3 transitions and animations yet)

sialivi said,

HTML5 only provide structure. Animation is done with Javascript (or CSS3, but I don't think IE9 supports CSS3 transitions and animations yet)


exactly, IE9 does not support the CSS3 animations module, and I doubt it will.
This is just old and plain HTML using Javascript for animations. It's even more appropriate to call it AJAX than HTML5, at least *it is* using XMLHttpRequest for returning the search results.

The only noteworthy HTML5 element they have is the animated beach on a canvas tag... and who is going to stare all day at the Bing homepage? Bing can't be better than Google just because it has more eyecandy, it needs to have better functionality and give better and more relevant search results

mail said,
SearchBar > Eye Candy

I'm confused... this has eye candy and a search bar. Unless you're on about a service called SearchBar or something?

Mr Byte said,
More waste of CPU cycles for eye candy.

Really? Did you just get here from 2001? I welcome anything that will take advantage of the plethora of CPU cycles just sitting here never being used.

solardog said,

Really? Did you just get here from 2001? I welcome anything that will take advantage of the plethora of CPU cycles just sitting here never being used.

Say that to someone running a Netbook, or some other low powered mobile device...
This is a complete waste of both cpu and bandwidth.

I have no doubt it will scale to only do this on systems that will handle it, but it just seems so redundant. I want better searchresults, not fancy animations to stare at while i wait for the non-existent results come pouring in....

Also it just shows a bad trend, what happens when all web content take this approach, I find it already ridiculous the amounts of ram and CPU you have to use if you have 5-10 tabs open with various web apps and sites running. Some sites bring the cheaper Netbooks to their knees on their own.

Eye candy for eye candy's sake on a web page? please, don't make this a trend.

Dipso said,

I have no doubt it will scale to only do this on systems that will handle it, but it just seems so redundant. I want better searchresults, not fancy animations to stare at while i wait for the non-existent results come pouring in....

If it scales on systems that can handle it then what is the problem? Im sure you will be able to turn it all off. And again its almost 2011, the weakest of the weak will be among the strongest of the strong within a year of this moment.

First of all it's a waste of time, just try to see what's the period of the transition animation, I need instant results, not waiting for a crap fade in animation. I'll stick to Google becouse it's clean, simple & fast.

If only their search results would be as useful as Google's results...

I love the Bing interface since day 1, but their search results aren't so good.

Wow, so is a huge video about eyecandy...?! how is this gonna convince me that Bing is a great seach engine? Only thing remotely usefull in that video is the part in the end where the search results expand as you scroll down the page...

I mean, I'm a sucker for eyecandy any day, and this is cool stuff. Its just that when you compare this to the recent launch of google instant, it kinda feels like they are spending their resources on innovating in all the wrong areas in what is supposed to be a _SEARCH_ENGINE_.

I think that was what put me off from bing when i first tried it out too... i had this feeling from the very start that Microsoft was like "Yeah", so, our search engine LOOKS, so much cooler with those big backgrounds!" and all i could think, yea, but how does that help me find that research material or my paper more efficiently?"

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