BitTorrent Torque set to revolutionize file sharing over browsers

Since 2001, BitTorrent has led to around 70 percent of the Internet traffic around the world, and with the introduction of BitTorrent Torque, the BitTorrent experience is now coming to the PC browser.

BitTorrent Torque will be an open source JavaScript interface for developers and users, where they will be able to integrate the power of BitTorrent into the browser. Using just a few line of codes the web developers could develop powerful applications for file sharing.

Now at the Torque labs, BitTorrent is showcasing some of the possible applications like Paddle Over and OneClick amongst others. The OneClick Chrome plug-in converts your torrent downloads into casual browser downloads and by using the Paddle Over you can share files from one PC to another. It also integrates social sharing and networking tools.

You can visit the Torque Labs for a glimpse of what BitTorrent is developing under the hood.

Source: BitTorrent Blog

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......wait wha?


i actually had this idea (i put it on neowin as a matter of fact i believe) of a social network site where users could trade files using the bittorrent protocol.

sounds a lot like this.

could i sue or should i have gotten a patent?

Both the examples, Paddle Over and OneClick prompts you to download an install unknown software on your computer.

How is this different from all the other sites out there that tries to get you to install SuperHappyFun.exe or whatever, when you click a link?

Last time i checked running a few line of JavaScript on a page shouldn't require you to install extra crap on all your computers.

errrr what ...... Opera has been able to download torrents directly for ages so how do they claim that it's coming to browsers when it's already here and has been for quite a while

Athlonite said,
errrr what ...... Opera has been able to download torrents directly for ages so how do they claim that it's coming to browsers when it's already here and has been for quite a while
Opera is a browser with a torrent client built in.. which is different from actually downloading a torrent from inside the "browser" itself..

It's like saying gmail, and Operas Mail are the same thing, just because both are done inside of the Opera client..

Mr Nom Nom's said,

Read the article for Christ sake, it says JavaScript NOT Java.

Thanks, if you didn't correct me my life might of been in danger! My life is totally now safe and I can now sleep better at night.
Keep up the good work, you might just solve world peace.

assuming is in early stage, but the problem is not as fast as torrent in terms of downloading speed.

Until it prove that is faster and more convenient that torrent client, then it will gradually turn into standard. which doesn't need someone to seed and will drastically be a game changer for file sharing. Consider this the successor of torrent if it work.

Hope they do it right....

'...the BitTorrent experience is now coming to the PC browser.'

Well, that's false, seeing as how Opera added BitTorrent to their browser years ago!

Asrokhel said,
'...the BitTorrent experience is now coming to the PC browser.'

Well, that's false, seeing as how Opera added BitTorrent to their browser years ago!

There's a massive difference between bloating up a browser with software that doesn't belong and running a JavaScript page....

Asrokhel said,
'...the BitTorrent experience is now coming to the PC browser.'

Well, that's false, seeing as how Opera added BitTorrent to their browser years ago!

This one is open source , and written in JS , ie any browser can use the code to build support for P2P sharing. Plugins have loopholes you know , so being written in JS is better. And who knows, this might become a standard !

funkydude said,

There's a massive difference between bloating up a browser with software that doesn't belong and running a JavaScript page....

How does it not belong? It's a protocol file downloading and sharing things on the internet, therefore it pretty much makes prefect sense to put it in in an internet suite / browser. Not that it bloats anything anyway

bogas04 said,

This one is open source , and written in JS , ie any browser can use the code to build support for P2P sharing. Plugins have loopholes you know , so being written in JS is better. And who knows, this might become a standard !

Also no one uses Opera so who cares

Asrokhel said,

Tell that to the people who use Opera.

Well people do use opera and the number is quite significant , but the problem is its the same people since years , their market share isn't rising you see.

bogas04 said,

Well people do use opera and the number is quite significant , but the problem is its the same people since years , their market share isn't rising you see.

You quoted the wrong person, you should've told that to the person I quoted.

Reading comprehension = Fail.

Asrokhel said,

You quoted the wrong person, you should've told that to the person I quoted.

Reading comprehension = Fail.

I wanted to quote you only and tell you that the numbers aren't rising , hence who cares.

The description sounds like it only downloads, doesn't seed? That's not really something we need more of...
Plus most ISPs screw your speed over as soon as you start using a torrent.

Principiante said,

ok... how do you do that? Where is the step by step guide 4 noobs?

Depends on the client, most have an option that sounds something like "Force outgoing encryption" or "Require encryption"

Principiante said,

again, where is the step by step guide for noobs?


google for vpn provider, personally i tried relakks.com and it was good, but certainly not the best, but it was cheap and good for me (my own connection itself was slow, so didn't need something fast which wouldn't have mattered).
the basic idea is it will route all of your network traffic through another server fully encrypted, so it will be like they are your ISP, will give you other IP address also. All of them have good detailed description and setup guides, and its as easy as setting up a regular connection to any ISP, except nothing hardware involved usually. A lot of them are pretty cheap also.
You would need to make sure to have one with good reputation, good speed (depends on your own connection) and price.

n_K said,

Plus most ISPs screw your speed over as soon as you start using a torrent.

Most ISPs? Really, most?

Kola said,
Most ISPs? Really, most?

Exactly. In the UK very few ISPs limit download speeds when using torrents. I got over 5MB/s (40Mbps) downloading the official (and legal) Counting Crows mini-album that was offered when installing uTorrent.

kInG aLeXo said,

google for vpn provider, personally i tried relakks.com and it was good, but certainly not the best, but it was cheap and good for me (my own connection itself was slow, so didn't need something fast which wouldn't have mattered).
the basic idea is it will route all of your network traffic through another server fully encrypted, so it will be like they are your ISP, will give you other IP address also. All of them have good detailed description and setup guides, and its as easy as setting up a regular connection to any ISP, except nothing hardware involved usually. A lot of them are pretty cheap also.
You would need to make sure to have one with good reputation, good speed (depends on your own connection) and price.

well... it's still a paid one
(I actually thought you were talking about a neat free solution)

Principiante said,

ok... how do you do that? Where is the step by step guide 4 noobs?

It's usually an option in settings/preferences of your bittorrent client. Deluge, the client I use, has the encrypt entire stream option, which prevents ISP's from identifying the bittorrent protocol, and thus shaping it.

Your client probably has a similar option. Just make sure everything is "forced", and the full stream is encrypted.

ViperAFK said,

Depends on the client, most have an option that sounds something like "Force outgoing encryption" or "Require encryption"

That's part of it, but if the protocol/handshake packets themselves aren't encrypted, ISP's can still throttle/shape the traffic. That's why full stream encryption is necessary.

My ISP was throttling my bt traffic in the evening, so I did that and it worked. I've never been throttled since

kInG aLeXo said,

google for vpn provider, personally i tried relakks.com and it was good, but certainly not the best, but it was cheap and good for me (my own connection itself was slow, so didn't need something fast which wouldn't have mattered).
the basic idea is it will route all of your network traffic through another server fully encrypted, so it will be like they are your ISP, will give you other IP address also. All of them have good detailed description and setup guides, and its as easy as setting up a regular connection to any ISP, except nothing hardware involved usually. A lot of them are pretty cheap also.
You would need to make sure to have one with good reputation, good speed (depends on your own connection) and price.

You forgot to mention, find one that doesn't keep any logs at all, because there are VPN providers that do keep logs!

Principiante said,

again, where is the step by step guide for noobs?


Windows Network Centre, (or how its spelled/called, im using dutch windows'es. not b y choice, lazyness )
go to change network settings.
see that overview of your network card? yes, awesome.
press alt, b ring down the menu if it isnt by default.
extra -> create network connection. select bussiness network (should've been called VPN for easierness)

follow steps and guidelines, MS provided allot of info on what to do, what not to do etc.
Yes its a few clicks away, but nothing you cant easily tell everyone to do.

simplezz said,

That's part of it, but if the protocol/handshake packets themselves aren't encrypted, ISP's can still throttle/shape the traffic. That's why full stream encryption is necessary.

My ISP was throttling my bt traffic in the evening, so I did that and it worked. I've never been throttled since


Thank god I'm dutch, where throttling parts of the internet is not allowed.
According to our law, "One shall not distinguish the differences in types of data going through the internet."
This came in view when KPN wanted to charge its customers for using skype or other VoIP services. But KPN isnt allowed to distinguish data from eachother it should all be treated the same.