BlackBerry Dakota; HD, touchscreen and mobile hotspot

blackberrydakota

If you're a BlackBerry fan, this is the news you've been waiting for. BGR.com managed to get pictures and specs of the BlackBerry Dakota, which features a number of impressive features, for RiM anyways.

The Dakota will have a capacitive touchscreen, be able to record HD video, have 3G hotspot capabilities, and come running Blackberry OS 6.1 out of the box. This will be the first time Research in Motion has launched a touchscreen phone with HD video recording. The BlackBerry Torch launched last year with touchscreen, but didn't come with an HD video recorder.

It appears RiM is finally changing their designs, just slightly. The Bold-style BlackBerry seems to have a smooth face, with a black and white keys. The BlackBerry key, return and call buttons all appear to be flat, rather than 4 separate button, like other Bold devices.

BGR also managed to get a list of specs for the device:

  • Quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE
  • Tri-band UMTS
  • 5 megapixel camera with HD video recording, flash, and image stabilization
  • 4GB of built in storage, 768MB of RAM
  • 2.8-inch VGA 640 x 480 capacitive screen
  • WiFi b,g,n on 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequencies
  • 3G mobile hotspot!
  • MicroUSB port
  • Bluetooth
  • NFC
  • Magnetometer
  • Accelerometer
  • Proximity sensor
  • 10.5mm thin
  • Launches with BlackBerry OS 6.1

Image Credit: BGR.com

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33 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

There's a reason why BlackBerry smartphones sell well. In the corporate environment, it's simply unmatched by other smartphones. Sure, there are Android-based smartphones with better specs - but can they offer services push-delivery technology for e-mail (plus BlackBerry Enterprise Server) and BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) for instant messaging?

Personally, I have a BlackBerry Curve 3G 9300 and I couldn't be happier. I was in the market for a new phone but I didn't want to pay a lot of money for the iPhone 4 or one of the many Android-based smartphones on the market.

As for the BlackBerry Dakota, I'm glad to see that they're using the flat-faced design of the Curve 3G 9300/9330. I hope they use a higher-clocked processor this time around. 1.0-1.2 GHz should suffice.

BlackBerry devices are for the business user market. The built-in security and Exchange server synchronization is far superior to both the iPhone or Android offerings. The physical keyboard is still a better solution for those that actually type lenghty reports and memos. Besides, these users are rarely accessing more than their email, calendar, and contacts. Until the iPhone or Android smartphones can offer the same level of security, there simply is no competition for BlackBerry in this market.

lexp said,
Mobile phone with a keyboard? What are they smoking?

How many meetings did you have today?

I had 6. How many e-mails did I send while in those meetings?

17. BB in the pocket or under the desk is a genius tool. QWERTY keyboards are preferred by many.

ascendant123 said,

QWERTY keyboards are preferred by many.

They definitely are. But I'm guessing you meant a physical keyboard (rather than touchscreen).

Looks exactly the same as my 9700 except that my phone buttons are green/red.
Not sure that it would be worth an upgrade unless contracts have expired.

As for comparing to iphone, that's a bit pointless. This is a business tool and RIM do a remarkable job with it. Blackberry's are second to none for the corporate user.

I wouldn't recommend them to any end-user though. They are best with iOS/Android/WP7 handsets

LLTC said,
Looks exactly the same as my 9700 except that my phone buttons are green/red.
Not sure that it would be worth an upgrade unless contracts have expired.

As for comparing to iphone, that's a bit pointless. This is a business tool and RIM do a remarkable job with it. Blackberry's are second to none for the corporate user.

I wouldn't recommend them to any end-user though. They are best with iOS/Android/WP7 handsets


Out of curiosity, what is the Blackberry lacking for an everyday end-user?

ascendant123 said,

Apps.

Don't you mean "games"? Because I'm running everything from Facebook to Pandora on my BB Bold 9700, no problemo.

As a BB user for the past year, amongst the many Apple fanbois in this forum, Blackberry has done considerably well in the recent move into the social user marketspace. It manages to stay between the corporate-user and social-user spectrum, without having to go to extremes like the iPhone (although we see a gradual increase in companies moving to the iPhone community).

However, from the corporate/government (think Obama) users point of view, the Blackberry has got the leading edge as it has dominated the market for years. It still offers a "true" push-capability when it comes to emails and now, social messaging, while offering AES encryption for communication between the phone and BIS/BES servers. Their in-built keyboard is still a strong forte for the user's typing comfort.

The iPhone, however is more geared towards the social users (mobile gamers, Facebook, candid camera shots, and heaps more). However, for other purposes like email and messaging communications, the iPhone (and the other major mobile operating systems) are using the pull-technology (e.g. ActiveSync), where most of the data processing is done on the phone. This explains their need for a 1GHz processor, which consumes more battery power. The perfect challenge is to run similar apps on both the Blackberry and an iPhone (i.e. Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo, Gtalk, Push Email and occasional web surfing), the Blackberry will most likely outlast the iPhone in this arena. The screen-based keyboard is still not the most comfortable thing to use if you intend to write a rather long email.

However, we can see RIM and Apple gradually exploring into each other's territories. The Dakota now features a 768MB RAM, which is a 256MB increase from their present Torch. This would probably be used to support newer and more powerful apps and additional phone features. The Torch already supports multi-gestures and has a very fast and compatible web-browser like the iPhone, but still in terms of battery life, my Torch can last easily for 2 days without a re-charge with Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo Messenger, Gtalk, Blackberry Messenger, push-email from private and company email servers, and occasional gaming and browsing while on my train ride to work.

Honestly, the constant flaming against other phone users from various Apple fanbois just ****es me off. At the end of the day, the iPhone is just a phone with multimedia and additional apps support, like any other modern smartphones today, except it is marketed differently, and comes with a higher price tag. It doesn't give these arrogant pricks a right to go around and pee on everyone else.

mirx said,
As a BB user for the past year, amongst the many Apple fanbois in this forum, Blackberry has done considerably well in the recent move into the social user marketspace. It manages to stay between the corporate-user and social-user spectrum, without having to go to extremes like the iPhone (although we see a gradual increase in companies moving to the iPhone community).

However, from the corporate/government (think Obama) users point of view, the Blackberry has got the leading edge as it has dominated the market for years. It still offers a "true" push-capability when it comes to emails and now, social messaging, while offering AES encryption for communication between the phone and BIS/BES servers. Their in-built keyboard is still a strong forte for the user's typing comfort.

The iPhone, however is more geared towards the social users (mobile gamers, Facebook, candid camera shots, and heaps more). However, for other purposes like email and messaging communications, the iPhone (and the other major mobile operating systems) are using the pull-technology (e.g. ActiveSync), where most of the data processing is done on the phone. This explains their need for a 1GHz processor, which consumes more battery power. The perfect challenge is to run similar apps on both the Blackberry and an iPhone (i.e. Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo, Gtalk, Push Email and occasional web surfing), the Blackberry will most likely outlast the iPhone in this arena. The screen-based keyboard is still not the most comfortable thing to use if you intend to write a rather long email.

However, we can see RIM and Apple gradually exploring into each other's territories. The Dakota now features a 768MB RAM, which is a 256MB increase from their present Torch. This would probably be used to support newer and more powerful apps and additional phone features. The Torch already supports multi-gestures and has a very fast and compatible web-browser like the iPhone, but still in terms of battery life, my Torch can last easily for 2 days without a re-charge with Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo Messenger, Gtalk, Blackberry Messenger, push-email from private and company email servers, and occasional gaming and browsing while on my train ride to work.

Honestly, the constant flaming against other phone users from various Apple fanbois just ****es me off. At the end of the day, the iPhone is just a phone with multimedia and additional apps support, like any other modern smartphones today, except it is marketed differently, and comes with a higher price tag. It doesn't give these arrogant pricks a right to go around and pee on everyone else.

Well put and I agree. I can't wait for this BB and to upgrade from my 9700. Also looking forward to the future BB's to come out.

mirx said,
As a BB user for the past year, amongst the many Apple fanbois in this forum, Blackberry has done considerably well in the recent move into the social user marketspace. It manages to stay between the corporate-user and social-user spectrum, without having to go to extremes like the iPhone (although we see a gradual increase in companies moving to the iPhone community).

However, from the corporate/government (think Obama) users point of view, the Blackberry has got the leading edge as it has dominated the market for years. It still offers a "true" push-capability when it comes to emails and now, social messaging, while offering AES encryption for communication between the phone and BIS/BES servers. Their in-built keyboard is still a strong forte for the user's typing comfort.

The iPhone, however is more geared towards the social users (mobile gamers, Facebook, candid camera shots, and heaps more). However, for other purposes like email and messaging communications, the iPhone (and the other major mobile operating systems) are using the pull-technology (e.g. ActiveSync), where most of the data processing is done on the phone. This explains their need for a 1GHz processor, which consumes more battery power. The perfect challenge is to run similar apps on both the Blackberry and an iPhone (i.e. Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo, Gtalk, Push Email and occasional web surfing), the Blackberry will most likely outlast the iPhone in this arena. The screen-based keyboard is still not the most comfortable thing to use if you intend to write a rather long email.

However, we can see RIM and Apple gradually exploring into each other's territories. The Dakota now features a 768MB RAM, which is a 256MB increase from their present Torch. This would probably be used to support newer and more powerful apps and additional phone features. The Torch already supports multi-gestures and has a very fast and compatible web-browser like the iPhone, but still in terms of battery life, my Torch can last easily for 2 days without a re-charge with Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo Messenger, Gtalk, Blackberry Messenger, push-email from private and company email servers, and occasional gaming and browsing while on my train ride to work.

Honestly, the constant flaming against other phone users from various Apple fanbois just ****es me off. At the end of the day, the iPhone is just a phone with multimedia and additional apps support, like any other modern smartphones today, except it is marketed differently, and comes with a higher price tag. It doesn't give these arrogant pricks a right to go around and pee on everyone else.

well put. when apple bring out a centralised server like BES, then it may get better business community consideration.

mirx said,
As a BB user for the past year, amongst the many Apple fanbois in this forum, Blackberry has done considerably well in the recent move into the social user marketspace. It manages to stay between the corporate-user and social-user spectrum, without having to go to extremes like the iPhone (although we see a gradual increase in companies moving to the iPhone community).

However, from the corporate/government (think Obama) users point of view, the Blackberry has got the leading edge as it has dominated the market for years. It still offers a "true" push-capability when it comes to emails and now, social messaging, while offering AES encryption for communication between the phone and BIS/BES servers. Their in-built keyboard is still a strong forte for the user's typing comfort.

The iPhone, however is more geared towards the social users (mobile gamers, Facebook, candid camera shots, and heaps more). However, for other purposes like email and messaging communications, the iPhone (and the other major mobile operating systems) are using the pull-technology (e.g. ActiveSync), where most of the data processing is done on the phone. This explains their need for a 1GHz processor, which consumes more battery power. The perfect challenge is to run similar apps on both the Blackberry and an iPhone (i.e. Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo, Gtalk, Push Email and occasional web surfing), the Blackberry will most likely outlast the iPhone in this arena. The screen-based keyboard is still not the most comfortable thing to use if you intend to write a rather long email.

However, we can see RIM and Apple gradually exploring into each other's territories. The Dakota now features a 768MB RAM, which is a 256MB increase from their present Torch. This would probably be used to support newer and more powerful apps and additional phone features. The Torch already supports multi-gestures and has a very fast and compatible web-browser like the iPhone, but still in terms of battery life, my Torch can last easily for 2 days without a re-charge with Windows Live Messenger, Yahoo Messenger, Gtalk, Blackberry Messenger, push-email from private and company email servers, and occasional gaming and browsing while on my train ride to work.

Honestly, the constant flaming against other phone users from various Apple fanbois just ****es me off. At the end of the day, the iPhone is just a phone with multimedia and additional apps support, like any other modern smartphones today, except it is marketed differently, and comes with a higher price tag. It doesn't give these arrogant pricks a right to go around and pee on everyone else.

Eloquently put.

I have had three blackberrys and won't be changing anytime soon. I have had the curve 8900, BOLD 9000, and now Torch 9800. They all still work flawlessly. I try different OS's, make themn look the way I want them to look. They run all social apps. But the best thing is the email and BBM (which I use a hell of a lot). I also have spare batteries for when I am away from a charging point. Browsing is now a hell of a lot better with OS6 and the webkit.
My bro on the other hand has an iphone, he likes his angry birds, little bit of FB, not much emailing, controlling his sonos, bit of game browsing. It suits him for what he does.
Both have good points, it's all what you want out of a phone. BUT, there have been times when I have called him to get no answer as his battery is flat from playing with too many apps...No spare battery on iphone.

Blackberry for me and everyone who I know have got one (many converts from iphone too) say the blackberry just works the way they expect it to work.

No matter what most of the kids here say about their full screen touch phones, most people in business have never opened anything more then a browser, email, text and contact list on their phone. The BlackBerry still excels for these people and probably will for a long time. It's the name anyone thinks of when they hear business phone.

The iPhone has come up closer to par with VPN, security and accessibility features but it still just doesn't have the reputation. Combine this with the fact that it is NOT Apple's primary business and you have hesitant business people.

There will always be the CTO's who love their toys, though.

yeah and I have no problems with blackberry's except the Curve seems to have Overheating problems at least the 8500. they told him to stick it in a freezer with the battery o_O

Other than that it's simple to use and browse.

I've never even heard of overheating problems with the blackberry...and I've left mine (all of them for the past decade) in the Sun plenty of times.

My iPad on the other hand croaked when left in the Sun. Fortunately, the "I'm too hot to work" message went away after it cooled.

Benjamin Rubenstein said,
Hey. It looks just like every other BlackBerry

exactly. I don't see much difference in "changing their designs". i think the torch is better, bigger screen and a slide keyboard. what's the use of the touch screen on this small screen.

Benjamin Rubenstein said,
Hey. It looks just like every other BlackBerry

OMG. Did you see the latest iPhone? iPad? iPod? All the same

Antraxek said,

OMG. Did you see the latest iPhone? iPad? iPod? All the same

I'm not an apple fan to be honest, but the newest iphone is significantly different from the previous one, there has only actually been one iPad and whilst the classic iPod hasn't changed every other iPod changed in a considerable way in the refresh. On the flipside, I literally couldn't tell you a single difference between Blackberry phones except for the torch. They have a stagnant, repetitive design and unless they reinvent, they are doomed.

tsupersonic said,
In a world w/ better mobile OS's, this looks meh...

And it still sells a lot in my country... This is all about trends... nothing else.
That will happen with this one too...
I really don't know what people think nowadays.

Jose_49 said,

And it still sells a lot in my country... This is all about trends... nothing else.
That will happen with this one too...
I really don't know what people think nowadays.

I know how you feel.