Blockbuster UK to shut down remaining 91 stores by Monday

Just a month after DISH Network closed its remaining Blockbuster stores in the U.S., the U.K. version of the video and game retailer is also shutting down for good. The company's administrator Moorfields announced Thursday that the remaining 91 Blockbuster stores will close by Monday, and 808 people will be losing their jobs less than two weeks before Christmas.

Blockbuster U.K. went into administration in late October, back when it had 264 stores in operation. Since then, Moorfields has been closing a number of retail locations while also trying to find a buyer for the company. MCV reports that the administrators were unsuccessful in this quest. In a statement on Thursday, Moorfields said, "Unfortunately, we were unable to secure a buyer for the group as a going concern and as a result had to take the regrettable action to close the remaining stores."

The remaining stores will sell off their stock of items at a highly reduced cost before they close for good on Monday.

Source: MCV | Blockbuster U.K. image via Shutterstock

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14 Comments

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I hate the high street with a passion! good riddance

Really hope currys / pc world go under in the next few years (still angry over them loosing my friends xbox one pre-order)

Feel sorry for the staff who have lost jobs. Why does it seem that most people get made redundant just before christmas?

The first who died was Sam The Record Man back in the days. Hmv adapted itself by selling videogames, but they will have a hard time with next gen consoles ,even if only 40% use download of games,it will hurt them still

This is the biggest mistake they made. They thought High Street shops and renting of pysical DVDs/Games was the way forward.

They should have gone massively on the Internet and offered a streaming service.

They made the same mistake HMV still are.

Streaming services are the way forward, hence Netflix, Lovefilm, Spotify, Google Music etc.

There is still a huge physical market, Blockbuster, like many companies just got too used to massive profits and when that changed, simply couldn't adjust. Happens all the time. No one was in a better position to develop streaming, but I can just see that getting shot down over and over by their obviously misguided upper management

They have a streaming service which I've never tried and they had a disc-by-mail service which was horrible. You could turnaround three Netflix rentals in the amount of time it took to get one disc from BB.

artnada said,
This is the biggest mistake they made. They thought High Street shops and renting of pysical DVDs/Games was the way forward.

They should have gone massively on the Internet and offered a streaming service.

They made the same mistake HMV still are.

Streaming services are the way forward, hence Netflix, Lovefilm, Spotify, Google Music etc.


This is the nature of all business. There are books written about disruptive changes in markets. The old players, no matter how attentive they are to the customer, and no matter how agile, are actually handicapped by "best practices" in the face of disruption. In other words, taking the wisest course of action at the time is the worst thing they can do.

While Netflix was building up its distribution network in the beginning, Blockbuster could've followed every bit of feedback they'd receive from Blockbuster customers. They could've evolved their service as rapidly as possible with the metrics accessible to them, and it wouldn't have equipped them for what was coming. It was just too much of a tangent from the whole industry model in place at the time.

It's easy for people to sit around, look back, and snarkily say "this is what they get for moving too slow", "they should've seen it coming", "they should've embraced the new way on day one". That's easy to say, and cute, but unrealistic, and actually would've been a poor business practice had it actually been what they did.

We're set up for the 'current' to be at constant risk of being replaced by the 'disruptive'. It's been a constant reality in the evolution of technology, and more evidence piles up year after year across all facets of the industry. Consumers--even enthusiasts--are so in the dark about what's going on and what leads up to these things that it's laughable how eager they are to have opinions and a sense of insight.

Dot Matrix said,

Chances are they have something else lined up at this point.

Considering this has been on the cards for some time, you'd hope they'd at least have been looking.