Brooklyn Bridge less warped in Apple's iOS 6 Maps update

When Apple launched its first in-house iOS map app for iOS 6 in mid-September, quite a few of the photo images that were placed in the app were, well, lacking in quality. One of the most obvious problems was with the images of the famous Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, which in Apple's iOS 6 map app looked like it was hit by a post-apocalyptic event.

Apple, via a letter from its CEO Tim Cook, has since sent out an apology for the iOS 6 map app launch and pledged to improve its mapping efforts. Today, some of that work showed up in a new update that fixed some of the photos visible in the maps.

 

AppleInsider.com reports that the 3D flyover photos of the Brooklyn Bridge have now been fixed in this update, giving the iconic landmark a full revamp that basically restores the bridge to its full glory. The image update is apparently not available for all iOS 6 map users, at least not yet, so it may take a day or two for the update to be rolled out to iPhone and iPad owners. We expect that Apple is scrambling to fix some of the more obvious issues in the map app before concentrating on adding features.

Source: AppleInsider.com | Images via Apple Insider and Huffington Post

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Even mapquest had at em and it was funny so did DJ ATB... it was that bad... that MAPQUEST of all places was more accurate with mapping data!!!

I support the effort of iOS 6 Maps. Mistakes happen, and in code, it can be fixed. Besides, that's what diagnostic & feedback are for in our iOS devices.

True, but I think a lot of it has to do with the logo on the back of the device. Even people who don't use Apple hold them to a higher standard it seems.

To me, it's nothing to fret over because there are alternatives, and if I'm dead set on Apple's offering, the best thing I could do now is submit feedback and wait. Something you have to do with other software from other companies. It would be bad if Apple took the feedback and said, "Thanks," and didn't roll out the updates until iOS 7 and then branded it a feature. That's something I would take to the forums over and vote with my wallet, but it appears they aren't doing that, so I occupy my time with other things.

I totally get where you're coming from. The first time I tested the Maps app was when I was taking a charter bus from Taunton, MA to Boston, MA & for some reason, it was actually accurate for me, even though there's been a lot of complaints and feedback. Of course, this is only one of my few destinations, so of course I can't it was perfect in my point of view.

Other than that, I really love exploring alternatives, especially learning about new ones out there from sites like Appstorm. I'm someday hoping to code my own in-house apps so I wouldn't have to rely on other services, everything I'd need would be secure and can be updated when I see fit to. I've dreamed that we could live a really custom lifestyle in gadgets.

MrXXIV said,
I support the effort of iOS 6 Maps. Mistakes happen, and in code, it can be fixed. Besides, that's what diagnostic & feedback are for in our iOS devices.

Mistakes?? It's unfinished POS software that never should have been released to the masses outside of a Beta. There is no excuse for that.

ahhell said,

Mistakes?? It's unfinished POS software that never should have been released to the masses outside of a Beta. There is no excuse for that.

Yea? Would you like to help build the Map system instead of being negative about it, or are you not capable of putting that keyboard to use instead of your mouth?

MrXXIV said,

Yea? Would you like to help build the Map system instead of being negative about it, or are you not capable of putting that keyboard to use instead of your mouth?


Asinine comment is asinine.

That photo is from a completely different angle. When using a different angle on different maps it normally loads different photos which are stitched together differently.

You can see this often on Google Maps for instance. You can see a reflection of a car in a window of a house that is obviously parked, but then when you turn there's no car there.

You can also sometimes notice for instance a difference in the color of a house if one image was taken in one year, and another in another year. A friends house used to appear this way. In one direction it was white, in another it was brown.

So I wouldn't say that this has fixed it until we see some very direct same angle same distance comparisons.

Actually looking at AppleInsider (I hadn't checked the sources until just writing this part of my post) it looks like they do have a much more direct comparison. It looks much better.

John why did you use images from 2 different sites when the images at AppleInsider are a much more direct comparison that highlight the differences in a much more accurate manner?

~Johnny said,
Doesn't matter what angle it's at... it's a 3D model with a single texture.

Ok maybe I'm not understanding how the maps work then. I thought they were a series of composited photos stitched together to create a panorama in 3D, and that each different angle and zoom level required a different composite.

So the entire globe is handled as a single texture and regardless of where I'm at in the globe, and what level of zoom or what angle I'm at I'm really just seeing the same picture?


Yes I'm being a bit facetious there at the end, but my point still remains. A different level of zoom and different angle requires different items to be stitched together to form the composite.

That said read the bottom of my comment where I asked why John didn't show the pictures from AppleInsider only...those pictures show the actual difference in a much more dramatic and correct manner.

Shane Nokes said,

Ok maybe I'm not understanding how the maps work then. I thought they were a series of composited photos stitched together to create a panorama in 3D, and that each different angle and zoom level required a different composite.

So the entire globe is handled as a single texture and regardless of where I'm at in the globe, and what level of zoom or what angle I'm at I'm really just seeing the same picture?


Yes I'm being a bit facetious there at the end, but my point still remains. A different level of zoom and different angle requires different items to be stitched together to form the composite.

That said read the bottom of my comment where I asked why John didn't show the pictures from AppleInsider only...those pictures show the actual difference in a much more dramatic and correct manner.

Dude, no one cares about how the maps were made. The fact is, they look like crap as shown above and we don't care what angle you look at it. It's unacceptable and Apple should once again be ashamed of themselves.

Shane Nokes said,
A friends house used to appear this way. In one direction it was white, in another it was brown.

Why would you paint a house brown?

Shane Nokes said,

Ok maybe I'm not understanding how the maps work then. I thought they were a series of composited photos stitched together to create a panorama in 3D, and that each different angle and zoom level required a different composite.

The map is overlayed with polygon based objects when you zoom in close enough, not just flat 2D surfaces like in a standard mapping application, ergo different angles doesn't matter. The only thing that matters to do with zoom level is that it only shows polygon based objects when you're zoomed in close enough - it doesn't effect model complexity. There are multiple (limited) zoom levels of the textures for the 3D models, but they're all sourced from the same base texture / imagery (akin to how mipmaps generally work). To get an idea, try out Nokia's online 3D Maps, it's a similar premise: http://maps.nokia.com/3D/

ingramator said,

Dude, no one cares about how the maps were made. The fact is, they look like crap as shown above and we don't care what angle you look at it. It's unacceptable and Apple should once again be ashamed of themselves.

You're missing my point. I think the new Maps program from Apple is crap, entire utter crap.

I'm not an Apple fan, and don't even own an iPod, MacBook, MacMini,, iMac, or any other Apple product. In fact, other than for the very short time I took the offer of a free iPhone 4 (in order to sell it to buy my old HTC Arrive) I'm not sure I've ever actually owned an Apple product.

I've had to use them a ton in the course of work and school, but I prefer PC's and such.

My point was about the article itself which was that there was already a good comparison shot that showed the same angles over on one of the linked websites. John pulled a photo from one site, and a photo from another.

To me it doesn't show the difference as well due to it being a different zoom level and angle. My point was why do more work to show something less impressive?

Examinus said,

Why would you paint a house brown?

The house was originally brown when they bought it. They pointed it to an off-white color that had a slight bluish tinge to it. I think it's called Iceberg White or something like that.

The first angle showed the new color...but when I changed angles on the house it was the old brown color.

~Johnny said,

The map is overlayed with polygon based objects when you zoom in close enough, not just flat 2D surfaces like in a standard mapping application, ergo different angles doesn't matter. The only thing that matters to do with zoom level is that it only shows polygon based objects when you're zoomed in close enough - it doesn't effect model complexity. There are multiple (limited) zoom levels of the textures for the 3D models, but they're all sourced from the same base texture / imagery (akin to how mipmaps generally work). To get an idea, try out Nokia's online 3D Maps, it's a similar premise: http://maps.nokia.com/3D/

I'll look at Nokia Maps, but I had still assumed that changing the zoom & angle would generate different composites as that is how it works on other 3D mapping solutions. I've seen more than a few who operate that way, including the example I gave above.

Examinus said,

Why would you paint a house brown?

The house was originally brown when they bought it. They pointed it to an off-white color that had a slight bluish tinge to it. I think it's called Iceberg White or something like that.

The first angle showed the new color...but when I changed angles on the house it was the old brown color.

Shane Nokes said,

You're missing my point. I think the new Maps program from Apple is crap, entire utter crap.

I'm not an Apple fan, and don't even own an iPod, MacBook, MacMini,, iMac, or any other Apple product. In fact, other than for the very short time I took the offer of a free iPhone 4 (in order to sell it to buy my old HTC Arrive) I'm not sure I've ever actually owned an Apple product.

I've had to use them a ton in the course of work and school, but I prefer PC's and such.

My point was about the article itself which was that there was already a good comparison shot that showed the same angles over on one of the linked websites. John pulled a photo from one site, and a photo from another.

To me it doesn't show the difference as well due to it being a different zoom level and angle. My point was why do more work to show something less impressive?

The house was originally brown when they bought it. They pointed it to an off-white color that had a slight bluish tinge to it. I think it's called Iceberg White or something like that.

The first angle showed the new color...but when I changed angles on the house it was the old brown color.

I'll look at Nokia Maps, but I had still assumed that changing the zoom & angle would generate different composites as that is how it works on other 3D mapping solutions. I've seen more than a few who operate that way, including the example I gave above.

Ok sorry champ, now we should all rage at John.

We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

Nope.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

They will only know about bugs if people report them but making a huge fuss over it doesn't benefit anyone.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

Bugs are one thing, glaring screw-ups however are quite another. When famous landmarks are as warped as they were in the initial release there is no excuse for it. At the very least when you build a map app you check the more famous things for accuracy and worry about the crap out in the boonies later. This was nothing short of a complete and utter failure by Apples programers and there QA department.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

These are not bugs. This is untested software released to the masses just to get a product out the door.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

For a company that had the slogan "it just works", this is unacceptable and an apology is not good enough. If any other company had this problem, then sure. But Apple has been...was...known for making good products with little to no problems. It is quite obvious that little testing went in to this app. Apple is so hell bent to sticking it to Android and not paying enough attention to other areas.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

Does this mean that we can use this line for any software that people think is buggy or not working as it should? For example (to those who think Win8 Metro is bad):

"Win8 is -21 days old. Give it time. A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features."

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

Google earth, maps and street view worked from day one...day one! There is no excuse for how bad this software is. Bugs are expected but iOS maps has an alpha like presentation to it, there is no way in hell this was ready for release.

It only demonstrates Apple's arrogance in believing its zombified sheep clown customers wouldn't notice. Well they did. Simply not good enough from the "it just works" company, it clearly doesn't and it's as simple as that, open your eyes dude.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

If Microsoft Excel originally shipped with the column letters out of order and the math didn't function correctly, it would be a failure. Apple Maps has landmarks out of order, locations incorrect, and can't navigate reliably at all.

Apple should have shipped iMaps with what does work (not very much, admittedly) instead of trying to jam all these incomplete and inaccurate features in there.

Dorza said,

Google earth, maps and street view worked from day one...day one! There is no excuse for how bad this software is. Bugs are expected but iOS maps has an alpha like presentation to it, there is no way in hell this was ready for release.

It only demonstrates Apple's arrogance in believing its zombified sheep clown customers wouldn't notice. Well they did. Simply not good enough from the "it just works" company, it clearly doesn't and it's as simple as that, open your eyes dude.

Nope. Google purchased the now Google Maps from some guys in 2004. It was pretty basic. It was 2 years after Google maps were officially first launched that Street View made an appearance, and then it was only major US cities.

What were you looking at on day one?

Dorza said,

Google earth, maps and street view worked from day one...day one! There is no excuse for how bad this software is. Bugs are expected but iOS maps has an alpha like presentation to it, there is no way in hell this was ready for release.

It only demonstrates Apple's arrogance in believing its zombified sheep clown customers wouldn't notice. Well they did. Simply not good enough from the "it just works" company, it clearly doesn't and it's as simple as that, open your eyes dude.

What rock were you hiding under?? please do your research before making Bulls**t comments like that.

Examinus said,

Nope. Google purchased the now Google Maps from some guys in 2004. It was pretty basic. It was 2 years after Google maps were officially first launched that Street View made an appearance, and then it was only major US cities.

What were you looking at on day one?

Day one of their launch is what he is looking at.

Compare this to day one of Apple's map launch.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

but they expected people to rely on it for critical things. They didn't say 'try our beta version of maps, but don't use it for critical things' like most beta software disclaimers...

nohone said,

Does this mean that we can use this line for any software that people think is buggy or not working as it should? For example (to those who think Win8 Metro is bad):

"Win8 is -21 days old. Give it time. A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features."

Sure. Say it. It's true. As far as Windows 8 goes, there will be bug fixes, security updates, service packs, and versions beyond 8. Why? Because no software is perfect. Some people will have problems that others do not, and hopefully those problems will be addressed. From my experience, I've had no problems with iOS 6 Maps. It takes me to where I need to go, and it's accurate. Also, the satellite imagery is more current than what Google offers.

But...

Unlike Windows 8, Apple shot themselves in the foot here because iOS 6 Maps was only open to be tested by paid developers, and not by anyone willing to install their beta software to give it a go like with Windows 8 DP and RC. Apple was in a rush, and I think that If they gave it more time in house, and opened up the beta more it would have been better out the gate. It still would have been release with issues, but it would have given people who don't use iOS 6 Maps anyway less of a reason to flip tables over it.

Dorza said,

Google earth, maps and street view worked from day one...day one! There is no excuse for how bad this software is. Bugs are expected but iOS maps has an alpha like presentation to it, there is no way in hell this was ready for release.

You and I remember Google Earth very differently. I lived in St. Louis when EarthViewer 3D was rebranded Google Earth, and I remember the satellite imagery was out of date by several years, and of low quality. Places that no longer existed were still listed, or places were in the wrong place.

Also, it took a while for Street View to come to the area I live in now, and in 2012, it's a mishmash of images taken over the last several years. Some are of poor quality from 2008 while a storm was rolling through, and some are of high quality from this past year. Also, I remember their being a lot of security and privacy concerns when both Earth and Street View launched. Like Maps for iOS, Google Maps has its issues too, and I didn't cry on Neowin about it not being up to my standards, or call people zombified sheep. I submitted feedback, like others have done, and I gave it time. It got better. It's not perfect, but it's certainly better than it was.

Nashy said,
These are not bugs. This is untested software released to the masses just to get a product out the door.

Incorrect - the software was tested and bug reports were given to Apple from testers but Apple chose to ignore the bug reports in favour of just shipping it. It is Apple themselves who have trumpeted the high standards so it is only fair that when they fail to meet those standards that they impose on themselves (and others) that they're called out for it when they fail.

lol nice, still we must be thankful.

Apple has made use Beta test maps.

They could have made us beta test the entire OS for 4 years *cough* Android *cough*

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

Fanboy justification for a company that claims their products 'just work'. Sorry but apple is going downhill and rapidly so. They havent innovated anything in years, just copied. And if it were android your comment would be the opposite.

Nashy said,

These are not bugs. This is untested software released to the masses just to get a product out the door.

And at a PREMIUM price. Apple's niche marketing only succeeds if the software is polished enough that people don't notice that Apple uses outdated tech in a shiny wrapper.

myxomatosis said,
We learned something today: A new program has issues and bugs. Give developers time, and the app will become better, less buggy, and will have more features.

iOS Maps is 1 month old. Give it time

I'm willing to bet you'd be singing a very different tune if this was Google Maps or Bing maps.

You Apple fanboys make me sick.

Examinus said,

Nope. Google purchased the now Google Maps from some guys in 2004. It was pretty basic. It was 2 years after Google maps were officially first launched that Street View made an appearance, and then it was only major US cities.

What were you looking at on day one?

And he did say 'Google Maps'. Common sense would dictate, that he was in fact referring to when *Google* released the maps app, branded as 'Google Maps'. And then it worked from day one.

Are you sure you're still not understanding it, or are you one of the iToot braindead zealotzombies hell bent on defending any and all **** ups from the fruit company?

JessJess said,
lol nice, still we must be thankful.

Apple has made use Beta test maps.

They could have made us beta test the entire OS for 4 years *cough* Android *cough*

Which, by the way, outclasses a certain fruit company's Golden Master OS releases in almost every way *cough* *cough* iOS *barf*

Sacha said,

Day one of their launch is what he is looking at.

Compare this to day one of Apple's map launch.

All of Google Map's day 1 features worked. You can't say that for iMaps day 1.

Examinus said,

Nope. Google purchased the now Google Maps from some guys in 2004. It was pretty basic. It was 2 years after Google maps were officially first launched that Street View made an appearance, and then it was only major US cities.

What were you looking at on day one?

Nope. He said Street View worked from day one. Clearly, that doesn't imply that Street View was available from day one of Google Maps, just that Street View worked on day one of being released.

What were you reading?

mikeyx12 said,

Nope. He said Street View worked from day one. Clearly, that doesn't imply that Street View was available from day one of Google Maps, just that Street View worked on day one of being released.

What were you reading?

I was reading the part where he said Maps and Street View worked from day one. They didn't: Street View was incredibly limited and buggy and the maps were pretty basic and grim when they first launched.

Don't you remember? I think we have a bit of a Windows Vista situation here: Apple have made something that isn't really very good, but people insist on comparing it to something that has matured over years. As with Google Maps, Windows XP was pretty god-awful on its launch.

Edited by Examinus, Oct 6 2012, 10:23am :

Dorza said,

It only demonstrates Apple's arrogance in believing its zombified sheep clown customers wouldn't notice. Well they did.

It's only arrogance if they are wrong. The sales figures so far would suggest they know exactly what their customers will put up with (and defend).

Drossel said,

Nope.


Haha. No, let's stop giving new software the benefit of doubt. We can no longer tolerate bugged initial revisions. Google Maps sucked at first too, but let's let that pass -- these are new times, with new demands!

Northgrove said,

Haha. No, let's stop giving new software the benefit of doubt. We can no longer tolerate bugged initial revisions. Google Maps sucked at first too, but let's let that pass -- these are new times, with new demands!

google maps sucked when there wasn't much else to replace it. I think people are upset because something that works was taken away from them and replaced with a really buggy piece of software...