Browsium Ion will help to get businesses off of IE6 forever

Microsoft has been trying to get people to stop using Internet Explorer 6 as their main web browser for a while now. Earlier this month, it announced that the percentage of IE6 users here in the US had dropped down to less than one percent. But there are still a number of businesses, especially overseas, that are still using applications that have to run on IE6 because they are also using Windows XP as their operating system.

This week, Browsium, a company formed in 2010 by former Microsoft IE team members, announced a new product called Browsium Ion that's designed to help business with this kind of situation. In short, Browsium Ion allows businesses who have applications that are based on IE6 and IE7 to run in IE8 for Windows XP and IE9 in Windows 7. This transition software should help ease any upgrade plans to Windows 7 and IE9 for businesses that have legacy programs that were dependent on IE6.

Businesses can download a free 60 day evaluation copy of Browsium Ion but final pricing depends on the number of PCs that the organization has for the program.

Microsoft has already announced that it plans to automatically update older versions of IE sometime later in 2012.

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18 Comments

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As a web developer I would be happy to at least get people off IE6 and 7. IE6 is already pretty dead, we don't support it unless clients pay extra. To be honest I wouldn't mind 8 dieing as well since it has some Javascript issues on top of being a **** browser in general.

What bugs me is that big companies seem to time and time again buy software from the least competent companies (who probably also make the cheapest offer) and seem oblivious to things like awful UI etc.

LaXu said,
As a web developer I would be happy to at least get people off IE6 and 7. IE6 is already pretty dead, we don't support it unless clients pay extra. To be honest I wouldn't mind 8 dieing as well since it has some Javascript issues on top of being a **** browser in general.

What bugs me is that big companies seem to time and time again buy software from the least competent companies (who probably also make the cheapest offer) and seem oblivious to things like awful UI etc.


+10 times infinite !!!
That is because the people making decisions on what to buy make their mind up based on the cheapest offer they can get, instead of asking the techies for their opinions or whether or not they can do anything with the software to be bought in the first place and then support it for the next 10 years.
Seriously, two jobs ago the director bought a piece of software during a golf game, because the other player said his son wrote a nice piece of software that is very useful. When he gave us the purchased software and said "Now use it", we couldn't tell him that it was a piece of crap and we already had at least two other applications that did the same thing. Waste of money, waste of our time,....., and 7 years ago, it is still being wasted...

Seems to me the BEST solution is to simply make IE10 compatible with ALL previous versions of IE. Problem solved.

Who is this impacting EXACTLY? If a company uses IE6 for their internal programs, and they are fine with it, WTF is the Problem, EXACTLY??!?!?

Who are we bullying the company or users? I just want to know..

rijp said,
Seems to me the BEST solution is to simply make IE10 compatible with ALL previous versions of IE. Problem solved.

No thanks, that seems like a horrible idea. Why should Microsoft have to keep supporting ancient broken software just because some companies want to continue to live in the stone age instead of updating their old poorly written applications?

rijp said,
Seems to me the BEST solution is to simply make IE10 compatible with ALL previous versions of IE. Problem solved.

Who is this impacting EXACTLY? If a company uses IE6 for their internal programs, and they are fine with it, WTF is the Problem, EXACTLY??!?!?

Who are we bullying the company or users? I just want to know..


Absolutely not, why would you want to reintroduce the crap that was IE6? It's time to move on and those companies stuck in their comfy WinXP/IE6 blanket need to buck and do it.

Staying as they are will do them no good at all. They will be leveraging old tech that won't have the improvements and security of modern options, I wouldn't be surprised if their maintenance costs go through the roof. Some bean counter will make the case for Browsium as a permanent solution when it should be temporary and used only as a bridge until they get with the times.

rijp said,
Seems to me the BEST solution is to simply make IE10 compatible with ALL previous versions of IE. Problem solved.

Wow, that's ... uninformed.

That's just literally not possible, while making IE10 a good standards-based browser. There is no simple way to test whether something should run in IE6/7/8/9/10 mode. As it is, in IE9 they had to use a manually curated list of website URLs, along with some ingenious (but not perfect) assumptions.

rijp said,
Seems to me the BEST solution is to simply make IE10 compatible with ALL previous versions of IE. Problem solved.

The problem isn't that Microsoft took out support for a standard in later versions of IE, it's that they were implementing non-standard things (and not implementing a few standard things), and website makers simply worked with that. Now that Microsoft is cleaning up the browser (making it more standards compliant), they have to do away with some of the "quirks" that many websites rely on. As @Kirkburn pointed out, there's simply no easy way for a web browser to check which browser mode it should be ran in.

Applications? Don't you mean plugins? & IE6 isn't the only browser you can use on XP, you can go up to IE8, or better yet, use a different browser....

MASTER260 said,
Applications? Don't you mean plugins? & IE6 isn't the only browser you can use on XP, you can go up to IE8, or better yet, use a different browser....

Applications were written that entirely depend on IE6 to function. Since IE6 is only on Windows XP which will be no longer supported as of April 2014, either companies move off now to Windows 7 or face security holes that will never get fixed.

MASTER260 said,
Applications? Don't you mean plugins? & IE6 isn't the only browser you can use on XP, you can go up to IE8, or better yet, use a different browser....

Applications were written that entirely depend on IE6 to function. Since IE6 is only on Windows XP which will be no longer supported as of April 2014, either companies move off now to Windows 7 or face security holes that will never get fixed.

MASTER260 said,
Applications? Don't you mean plugins? & IE6 isn't the only browser you can use on XP, you can go up to IE8, or better yet, use a different browser....

A lot of large companies will build / buy web based applications to run or connect to business systems.
Not plug ins, but full applications that are accessed using the browser.

MASTER260 said,
Applications? Don't you mean plugins? & IE6 isn't the only browser you can use on XP, you can go up to IE8, or better yet, use a different browser....

The issue isn't browser availability, it's HTML app compatibility, as many corporate apps were written with the specific quirks of IE6 in mind

warwagon said,
Sweet, but are companies going to want to spend money?
Don't upgrade, don't spend money. Upgrade, spend money on compatibility software.

Pretty sure most companies won't spend the money UNLESS they are forced to upgrade their browser or Windows version (e.g. Windows 7 transition).

warwagon said,
Sweet, but are companies going to want to spend money?
They never want to spend money, that is why business is stuck in IE6 hell. The biggest benefit I see in this announcement is the IE9 mention. Moving right to 9 while nursing 6 along as business catches up.

zeke009 said,
They never want to spend money, that is why business is stuck in IE6 hell. The biggest benefit I see in this announcement is the IE9 mention. Moving right to 9 while nursing 6 along as business catches up.

Moving to 9 means upgrading to Windows 7. A.k.a. more money.

TDT said,

Moving to 9 means upgrading to Windows 7. A.k.a. more money.
They have to move to Win7 anyways. So that money was going to spent one way (Win7) or another (migrate to other OS).

A major business (corporation, not small mom/pop shop) will not be able to reliably safe guard and provide services to customers using an OS that is unsupported by the vendor.

zeke009 said,
They have to move to Win7 anyways. So that money was going to spent one way (Win7) or another (migrate to other OS).
A major business (corporation, not small mom/pop shop) will not be able to reliably safe guard and provide services to customers using an OS that is unsupported by the vendor.

It will be a hell of a lot cheaper to spend money on this Browsium Ion, than to migrate the infrastructure to a new OS and IE environment, especially in a corporate environment.
I'm not saying this should be a replacement, but while IT is sorting out the migration, this should help along nicely