BT leaks email addresses of hundreds of customers

BT is planning to offer fibre-optic broadband service to all of the UK. One of their marketing programs is the “Race to Infinity,” a website that is collecting votes for which areas should be included in the next rollout. Votes will be collected until the end of the year and the five areas with the most votes will be put at the top of the list for the new service.

As part of the program, BT is looking for unpaid volunteers to get the word out about the company, their plan, and what potential customers should do to get fibre in their area. In essence, BT was trying to get their program to go viral.

And go viral it has, but not in the way BT was hoping for. Two days ago, they sent an email out to hundreds of their volunteers with information on how to spread the word. Unfortunately they forgot to use the “bcc” line when sending out the mail blast, so ended up sharing personal email addresses to everyone on the list. Then, showing their complete lack of understanding on how email works, they attempted to recall the message.

BT’s PR firm, Porter Novelli, has issued an apology for the snafu but the damage is done. While it could have been worse (like BT’s gaffe last month, sending customer details unencrypted over the wire), it’s a reminder to always think twice before sharing personal information.

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CC must die, i really hate the ppl sending mails to 10s of persons with CC instead BCC, BCC must be standard and not the crapy CC.

Aokromes said,
CC must die, i really hate the ppl sending mails to 10s of persons with CC instead BCC, BCC must be standard and not the crapy CC.

You don't get out much do you.

Marketing firms shouldn't be using a regular mail client in the first place. They should have an automated system for sending out mailshots like this. That way there'd be no chance of mistakenly sending it out to 900 people revealing all the email addresses.

There are legitimate uses of CC. For instance, emailing my boss but I want my colleagues to know about it too. I couldn't put my colleagues in To because its not directed at them, and BCC wouldn't work either because I want my boss to know the whole team knows about it.

TCLN Ryster said,

You don't get out much do you.

Marketing firms shouldn't be using a regular mail client in the first place. They should have an automated system for sending out mailshots like this. That way there'd be no chance of mistakenly sending it out to 900 people revealing all the email addresses.

There are legitimate uses of CC. For instance, emailing my boss but I want my colleagues to know about it too. I couldn't put my colleagues in To because its not directed at them, and BCC wouldn't work either because I want my boss to know the whole team knows about it.

yes that's the right way to use the CC and BCC - same for most companies I would expect.

Lern2email.

Anyway, I entered my e-mail because I thought it would be interesting to find out more about the campaign, but now I wish I hadn't bothered.

It seems some people decided to forward the e-mail on. Nice one, just spread the addresses around some more...

jren207 said,
Lern2email.

Anyway, I entered my e-mail because I thought it would be interesting to find out more about the campaign, but now I wish I hadn't bothered.

It seems some people decided to forward the e-mail on. Nice one, just spread the addresses around some more...

aye, its a Spammer wet-dream, just hope mine didn't appear (haven't had the email) or did it get recalled.....

BT are a massive shower of ****, dealing with them is like talking to monkeys but getting no positive response (with a standard monkey, it can respond well to proper stimulus, BT monkeys will read the script, then read it again, then put you on hold while they have imaginary chat to someone above them, then read it again..............).

I worked for a quality UK ISP for a while, and nearly 100% of all connection issues (excluding customers needing help setting up and wifi issues etc) were the result of BT, either allowing one of their monkeys loose in the exchange or an infrastructure issue stopping logon requests being sent to ISP - they are a bunch of inept idiots, or underfunded unlucky f**ks, either way they are useless!

With such mistakes like this I can only imagine how reliable and effective their "fibre-optic broadband service to all of the UK." shall be... Now in other related news

"Trefor Davis, chief technology officer of internet service provider Timico, noted that there are "great swathes" of the country that will not be covered by BT's super-fast broadband rollout."

http://www.cable.co.uk/news/fi...ties-says-expert-800119282/

For those of you within the UK.. My suggestion is to stay as far away from this shady looking company as possible.. They can't seem to tell which side of the technology line they're standing..

We Can - But We Prove We Don't Know What Were Doing | We Can't Because We Don't Know What Were Doing.

| = The Line

I read the text, not knowing what BT meant in this context and all this time I was thinking "what the hell does BitTorrent have to do with that and why the hell is it referring to "the BitTorrent"?!"...

Well, that stuff is not supposed to happen but it does... unfortunately. Deutsche Telekom did that in the past... All of them did... Most... Whatever.

corporate mail clients should force only one email address allowed in the to field, this happens too damn often.

I'm one of those affected and so far about 20 people on the list have taken it upon themselves to e-mail everybody else with their inane opinions of BT, like we care or can do anything about it.

Cheers, BT

CarlBooth said,
I'm one of those affected and so far about 20 people on the list have taken it upon themselves to e-mail everybody else with their inane opinions of BT, like we care or can do anything about it.

Cheers, BT

It wasn't 20, it was 6. And one of those was a reply to another one. Exaggeration FTL

It happens to the best of us. I recently told a business partner that I didn't like a certain person but I needed some logon info from him. In the email I even said to my business partner don't just forward the info along. What do you think he did? Yeah he did. So it happens.

Sucks for those in the list.

I was one of those affected and think it's a joke that BT do business with a publicity firm that has such amateurish practises as Porter Novelli. Also, I must take exception to the line in their statement that reads... "The original email communication has been recalled and apologies issued to all of those affected. ". Firstly you can't actually recall emails, secondly I haven't received an apology so that statement is a blatant lie.

TCLN Ryster said,
Firstly you can't actually recall emails, secondly I haven't received an apology so that statement is a blatant lie.

you can recall emails in an office/corporate environment, as long as the message has not been opened/read. not sure if it works with 100's of POP3 email addresses on different networks, I would hazard a guess at no in this instance. from my suspicious techy mind, i would suspect they got the office junior to do the mail merge.

Mogsy said,

you can recall emails in an office/corporate environment, as long as the message has not been opened/read. not sure if it works with 100's of POP3 email addresses on different networks, I would hazard a guess at no in this instance. from my suspicious techy mind, i would suspect they got the office junior to do the mail merge.

You can recall emails if you are using exchange, but I think it only works if the person you are emailing is within the same organisation, once it's left the exchange server/cluster all bets are off (Probably the same with other email systems that support this feature)

Their 'race to infinity' is a joke.

They were supposed to link up all the fibre optics they installed a year late (was supposed to be

Nov 2008 didn't happen till Sept 2009) in March 2011 now they

they have decided not to do it till last day of September 2011, so why they try and make out they

trying to bring Britain into the 'super highway' is a joke.

To be fair, at least they're trying. They were prevented years ago from nationwide fibre rollout as it was deemed anticompetitive and unfair to the independent (at the time) phone companies. You can blame the last Tory government for the woeful state of high speed access.

Shining Arcanine said,
What does BT mean?

British Telecom. But don't be mislead; they're a brilliant and very friendly company.

Shining Arcanine said,
What does BT mean?

It actually doesn't mean anything, strictly speaking. BT is the official name of the company. Obviously they took it from the initials of the previous name, British Telecom, but officially it doesn't stand for anything.

testman said,

It actually doesn't mean anything, strictly speaking. BT is the official name of the company. Obviously they took it from the initials of the previous name, British Telecom, but officially it doesn't stand for anything.

Correct - much like BP and LG.

Meph said,

British Telecom. But don't be mislead; they're a brilliant and very friendly company.

They're the worse company I've ever dealt with, and there customer complaint phone lines are also the worst I've had to deal with - and sadly too many times I;ve had to contact them for myself and relatives. I would never recommend them to anyone.

A common mistake. I've done it with group e-mails for a singing club at my school. Sometimes those little oversights can be big problems.