Buffalo Bills receiver Stevie Johnson tries Google Glass

 

"These shades make me look cool" - Not said by Stevie Johnson

It's no secret that Google hopes to revelutionize the wearable computing market with Google Glass, and is expected to release the product to the public by the end of the year. Although the release date is close and there are many videos online, most people have yet to see what the technology is capable of in person.

Someone gave Buffalo Bills wide receiver Stevie Johnson Google Glass to try out in training camp, and he comes away very impressed with the latest technology. At the start of the video, he's being taught how to take pictures with a voice command. After some minor technical difficulties, the excercise works and Johnson says, with a big grin on his face, "Wow, that's crazy!" Later, Johnson is playing catch with fellow teammate Brad Smith, and the resulting video looks like something you'd see in a video game. Next up, Johnson starts signing autographs for a bunch of fans, one of which notices the new technology. When asked about it, the star receiver says, "They're crazy. They're fresh. Check the Buffalo Bills website to see yourself on it."

Johnson came away extremely impressed with Google's wearable tech, saying, "Fresh. Next level. I need these. I need these."

Source: BuffaloBills.com | Image via BuffaloBills.com

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18 Comments

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Wait, I thought they said in the past you couldn't wear any type glasses or anything with this? he's clearly wearing shades...

clip on shades come in the box
but prescription glass is supposed to be in final product not yet avalaible in current prototype

I do think that they will become the next big thing. They got some issues to deal with but otherwise it's a step in the right direction.

shinji257 said,
I do think that they will become the next big thing. They got some issues to deal with but otherwise it's a step in the right direction.

Obviously it will take a couple more years for them to be refined and have better hardware (maybe HD 1080p recording possibly, etc) Just how the iPod touch took 3-4 years to mature.

shinji257 said,
I do think that they will become the next big thing. They got some issues to deal with but otherwise it's a step in the right direction.

Its nowhere near the right direction. All of the privacy problems surrounding it are just too enormous at this point. The tech on the other hand, sure, its quite a nifty little thing.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,

Its nowhere near the right direction. All of the privacy problems surrounding it are just too enormous at this point. The tech on the other hand, sure, its quite a nifty little thing.

Don't see how its different from a camera or your phone. You can be discrete about it that's all... but you can also with these tiny phones nowadays.

You have to point the phone at something to record it
Now you only have to look in some direction and you can record it.

Also in many countries phone's are required by law to make a flash or some camera-shutter-like sound.

Shadowzz said,
You have to point the phone at something to record it
Now you only have to look in some direction and you can record it.

Also in many countries phone's are required by law to make a flash or some camera-shutter-like sound.

Well the United States isn't one of those countries If other countries want to limit technology then that's their fault, but I feel if once Google makes it mature enough for everyday use I think it will be mainstream.

How is it limiting technology to make it publically recognizable if you record imagery, video or sound?
I would personally mind a LOT less if when you take a picture with Google Glass, that it is forced to make a shutter sound. Or when you're taping it gives a little regular beep or something.
At least with a phone you have to point the thing at the object(s) you're filming/photographing. Google Glass makes it feel like people are carrying hidden recording devices.

Shadowzz said,
How is it limiting technology to make it publically recognizable if you record imagery, video or sound?
I would personally mind a LOT less if when you take a picture with Google Glass, that it is forced to make a shutter sound. Or when you're taping it gives a little regular beep or something.
At least with a phone you have to point the thing at the object(s) you're filming/photographing. Google Glass makes it feel like people are carrying hidden recording devices.

Never heard of hidden recording devices or secret tapes eh?

onionjuice said,

Never heard of hidden recording devices or secret tapes eh?


Cause every individual has those?
If Google Glass hits off, many people will suddenly have hidden recording devices.

Shadowzz said,

Cause every individual has those?
If Google Glass hits off, many people will suddenly have hidden recording devices.

Yah anyone can buy secret cameras lol they aren't very expensive and easily available. Pocket cams?

Shadowzz said,
How many people do you know that carry around a hidden camera?
And how many people would like fancy gadgets like a Google Glass?

People I know don't carry a hidden camera because they have no reason to secretly record anything? If someone really wants to tape something secretly they can do it with ease with a simple gadget.

Once again, in a world where things such as button and pocket cams exist, I don't think its very surprising for people to see that someone can record you with Google Glass.

Yes because if they want to do that, they have to buy separate devices.
If it comes packed in a device they will already use, the level is a lot lower to actually use it.
I'm glad I had my youth before all these gadgets where so easily available, I did a lot of stupid stuff and I'm really glad that stuff never made it to recordings and onto the internet.

I'm 99.99% sure that's not true - it's just someone with the Bills media that had them and wanted to get something for their site. That's Stevie's personality.

In addition, the sites says it's "Google Glasses" -- if Google paid for it, why would they get the name wrong?

Edited by Fezmid, Aug 17 2013, 4:08pm :