Bug in Windows Store showing false high app rankings?

Technically, Windows 8 won't officially launch to the public until October 26th. However, a few people can already obtain Microsoft's next operating system by legal means. Windows 8 app developers can also submit their apps to the Windows Store and those early users can download and rank them, if they wish.

This weekend, the McAkins Online website has posted up an alert that seems to show a bug in how the Windows Store currently handles their list of highest ranked Windows 8 apps. According to the post:

The picture above shows highest rating report in the Store. According to Microsoft, ASUS WebStorage is the highest rated app in the Store, but when you check its rating, it only has one rating at 5-Stars. Same for the next app and the next.

The web site points out that there have been hundreds of rankings for Windows 8 apps such as MetroTwit, Fresh Paint or Fruit Ninja, which has the true highest ranking on the Windows Store.

The same report is also critical of some of the categories that Windows 8 apps are placed in the Windows Store. Among other examples, it shows that the recently launched $499.99 app, the EMS Surface, is placed in the Health and Fitness category of the store. While it is supposed to be used in medical offices, it's more of a data retrieval app and would be better placed in the Business category.

Source: McAkins Online | Image via McAkins Online

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Google Fiber in Kansas City to go live in a few weeks

Next Story

Nokia joins Samsung in slamming iPhone 5

23 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

well this is a bit of a double edged sword. on one hand you can project overall crowd popularity, witch can stagnate the high rankings page after a wile. Or, you can make it so that the most recent highest rated apps are displayed, giving discoverability to devs and keeping a healthy constant rotation.

All that said. Microsoft may want to place a minimum vote quoter in place to prevent a single person from bumping them to the top. It would also be a good idea for them to have the "Highist ranking" page show crowd results, and add a "Next big thing" page that will show the most recent apps that have met their high vote quoter.

well this is a bit of a double edged sword. on one hand you can project overall crowd popularity, witch can stagnate the high rankings page after a wile. Or, you can make it so that the most recent highest rated apps are displayed, giving discoverability to devs and keeping a health constant rotation.

All that said. Microsoft may want to place a minimum vote quoter in place to prevent a single person from bumping them to the top. It would also be a good idea for tham to have a "Highist ranking" page that shows crowd results, and a "Next big thing" page

Well, when I look for an app I always read couple of the reviews; if I see there is only one with 5 stars.... I take the rating with a grain of salt.
What they could add is a sorting by the actual number of reviews allowing people to easily cross checking.

Fritzly said,
Well, when I look for an app I always read couple of the reviews; if I see there is only one with 5 stars.... I take the rating with a grain of salt.
What they could add is a sorting by the actual number of reviews allowing people to easily cross checking.

That would be the best option.

Fritzly said,
Well, when I look for an app I always read couple of the reviews; if I see there is only one with 5 stars.... I take the rating with a grain of salt.
What they could add is a sorting by the actual number of reviews allowing people to easily cross checking.

To be completely frank, if they sorted by the number of reviews, the attitude would just shift to "all these five star reviews are fake".

People don't want to be satisfied with what's in front of them, and if they disagree with a product's rating, they whip up whatever 'truth' they require to make that rating irrelevant. Whether an app has five 5-stars or one 5-star, the odds of the average score reflecting the reality of the app's quality are roughly the same.

You could just spend five minutes reading the reviews of an app with hundreds of reviews on, say, the Google Play store, and marvel at how petty and childish people are in determining their scores. I'd be more interested in learning which apps have the most active users, calculated against the length of time people keep the app installed. Or apps most likely to be added to users' home screens. Stats that show more than people's shallow initial impressions.

ArialBlue said,
n00b programming by Microsoft, not a bug.

Waiting for W8 R2 here.


Yeah, just like those n00bs at Newegg that do the exact same sorting.

/what, everyone likes Newegg? n/m then

Joshie said,

Yeah, just like those n00bs at Newegg that do the exact same sorting.

/what, everyone likes Newegg? n/m then

"But mommy, Jonny did this too so it must be okay!!"

Good companies lead the way to progress, not just follow what the majority are doing.

andrewbares said,

"But mommy, Jonny did this too so it must be okay!!"

Good companies lead the way to progress, not just follow what the majority are doing.


Not the point. The point is that people are acting like Microsoft is doing something worse than everyone else, that they're being 'amateur' and 'n00b' about it, when it'd be more accurate to say they're using an *industry standard* sorting method.

It's perfectly legitimate to say there should be something better than the current standard, but laying all of the disappointment at Microsoft's doorstep is just about the most ignorant and stupid route to take here.

I mean, seriously, at least there's freakin' SORTING. God forbid you want to sort something over at Google, where 'sort' is a dirty word, and we're all just expected to refine our searches.

Andrew Lyle said,
Not exactly a bug... It's bad algorithm programming by Microsoft.

From what I've understood (and if this is wrong I apologize) they prefer to use the straight average for their ratings as doing otherwise can tend to weight things more towards certain scenarios that they may want to avoid.

Shane Nokes said,

From what I've understood (and if this is wrong I apologize) they prefer to use the straight average for their ratings as doing otherwise can tend to weight things more towards certain scenarios that they may want to avoid.

That's ridiculous... this is weighting it towards the developer who rated his own app 5 stars and no one else has rated it! Crappy system!

It's practically impossible for an app with 2,000 ratings to be rated 5.0/5.0, while it's super easy for a developer to rate their own app they just released 5 stars. Why should an app with a 4.96 average from 2,000 ratings be below something that was just released and actually doesn't have any reviews??

(I'm not disagreeing with you, I'm disagreeing with Microsoft's reasoning)

Windows 8 has not yet released to public. maybe they are testing something. specially windows store because its an external service, its not related to core windows

Indeed, it's just a measure of the average rating. If it only has 1 rating and that rating is a 5, then the average is 5.

That's not a false rating...that's how averages work.

Heck in that case there's a ton of false ratings on Amazon...

With a decent rating system they also take into account the quality of the rating value. For example, a product rated 4.5 averaged from 100+ votes should be rated higher than a product rated 5 with one vote.