Burma Cuts Internet Access

The ruling junta in Burma has cut internet access to citizens in an attempt to stop footage of pro-democracy protests escaping the country. Internet cafés have been closed and the state ISP is claiming that a damaged cable has led to a total internet shutdown across the country, though the veracity of this story is questionable at best. This move comes after the extensive filming of the latest protests on mobile phones and video cameras; the movies have consequently been sent across the web, generating large amounts of negative press for the junta.

"They are going to delay the message, but they are not going to stop it," British journalist Dominic Faulder told Reuters. "This time, there will be more pictures and they will come out." Although Burma is subject to some of the strictest censorship in the world, images of the protests, including the beatings of Buddhist monks and the killing of a Japanese photographer, have all been sent out via the internet.

News source: vnunet.com

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What a retarded move, shooting a foreign journalist. Not least since Japan is one of their major trading partners. I wonder how long they'll stay in power...

TOP NEWS: Buddhist monks burn damaged fiber optic cables with THEIR OWN MIND.

Murkey said,
What a retarded move, shooting a foreign journalist.

+ while it's being broadcasted on live TV.

Murkey said,
What a retarded move, shooting a foreign journalist. Not least since Japan is one of their major trading partners. I wonder how long they'll stay in power...

equally dumb is the japanese reporter. remind me of a bunch of korean christian idiots who "toured" afghan, thinking they can simply change the world. guess what? it's not that simply.

Wow... this is horrible. Luckily Burma's government isn't powerful enough worldwide and will not be able to last long, especially, as Murkey said, with Japan's reaction to the killing of their journalist. They will just fall to ruin economically. That is, unless there is a revolution before then...

soniqstylz said,
Except that it's now called Myanmar, not Burma.

This is why, in case anyone was wondering:

Myanmar achieved independence from the United Kingdom on 4 January 1948 as the “Union of Burma”. On 18 June 1989, the State Law and Order Restoration Council adopted the name “Union of Myanmar”. This was recognised by the United Nations, but not by the US or UK Governments

SimpleRules said,
Do you really want to call it the name the millitary imposed?

Yes. That's its name since 1989. Hopefully after the revolution they'll change it back.

Angel Blue01 said,

Yes. That's its name since 1989. Hopefully after the revolution they'll change it back.


Now Australia will be called Dingoland, I declared it. That is now its name.

If you recognize the millitary's declared name, you recognize their right to rule ... if they can name it, they can rule it!
It would be silly to say they have no right to rule Myanmar, since you've established you believe they have a right to change its legal name and thus you've established their right to rule.

I knew a priest from Burma - very influential person in my life - helped me understand life and the world in an entirely new way. He left for Burma about 7 years ago to continue his missionary work in the jungles of Burma. He had talked about how he wanted to help his people. It is very sad their military government doesn't want to do what is good for the people. This is very sad news, not only the sudden shutdown of the Internet in Burma, but the entire situation. I hope this ends very soon and peace returns and the Burmese people are freed from this military government. :ponder:

wickerdude said,
This is where our troops should be.....helping people who actually want democracy.

Excellent point but there's no oil. Crying state of affairs the world has come to.

No ... if you say they should be there, why not Iraq, or Afghanistan or Somalia, heck Pakistan, Iran ... there are so many places in the world where there isn't democracy, if you support one you have to support them all ...

Millitarily imposed democracy? Not to forget that half of the countries that gain democracy that way aren't really free ... South Korea has had a pro-US foreign policy since they were given the gift of democracy, but did their people really want that?

if dumbya is smart enough, he would invade burma.

ah but then dumbya is a dumb@$$, and burma is without fossil fuel ...

Saddam did the same things, the Taliban did ... invade one, invade them all. To say it would be right to invade here but not Iraq is silly ...

He probably invaded for the oil etc, but if you believe it OK to wage war against any undemocratic state, you'll be waging lots of wars, against Iraq as well.

SimpleRules said,
Saddam did the same things, the Taliban did ... invade one, invade them all. To say it would be right to invade here but not Iraq is silly ...

He probably invaded for the oil etc, but if you believe it OK to wage war against any undemocratic state, you'll be waging lots of wars, against Iraq as well.

yes dumbya (and his cohorts) invaded afghan & iraq for oil, but they did it under the pretense of "liberating" the countries, restoring "democracy", etc craps. it's a freaking disgrace to and for the american people.

if he REALLY want to do any good, this time without any obvious agendas, he would invade burma.

Actually most of their Internet and phone system runs off the ipstar sattelite system which was originally implemented and owned by the former PM Thaskin of Thailand, who was was himself ousted in a bloodless military coup about a year ago. Hmmmm wonder what cables they are talking about or did they ask the present owners of the Sattelite system to cut transponders to the footprints that cover that area. Someone should check this out for facts.

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