CES2010: Sharp introduces quad-pixel series HDTVs

Today Sharp announced their new lineup of Sharp AQUOS HDTV's, with innovating technology in display colour. Sharp has taken the leap forward from the traditional RBG primary colours, adding in yellow as the fourth primary colour (RBGY), in what they call, Quad-Pixel technology.

The new series of Sharp AQUOS will be able to produce 1 trillion colours, from the standard 1 billion colours in conventional HDTV's. The new lineup of Sharp AQUOS LE will come equipped with LED backlight technology, and be full 1080P LED TV's.

Sharp's new lineup will use as much power as a single lightbulb (115W), 50% reduction from conventional LCD HDTV's (52-inch), and up to 80% over CCFL lghts. Sharp promises to display sharper and better images than ever before, with blacker blacks and whiter whites on their new series lineup.

All new Sharp LED HDTV's will be Internet equipped with Netflix and Twitter Integration, called "Twitter for Sharp", using AquosNet.

Sharp's new lineup will include the LE920 full HD X-Gen panel, four primary colours (RGBY), 240Hz AquoMotion, 1.6-inch thin LED panel, in 52, 60, and 68-inch, available May 2010. Sharp also announced their LE820 and LE810 models with full HD X-Gen panel, four primary colours (RGBY), 120Hz, UltraBrilliant Edge-Lit LED, 1.6-inch thing LED panel, in 40, 46, 52, and 60-inch, available March 2010.

Sharp's LC-60E88UN AQUOS LED HDTV will only be available in a 60-inch model, 240Hz, 4-HDMI ports and high contract ratio. Their D78/D68 series HDTV's will support 120Hz, full 1080p HD, in 32, 40, 46 and 52-inch sizes.

If smaller suits your needs, Sharp is making smaller Edge-Lit LED in 19 (720p), 22 and 32-inch models, in an ultra-thin design of 1.49", available in May and June 2010.

Sharp will also be introducing a new home theatre system with the BD-HP70U AQUOS Blu-Ray player with Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master audio, WiFi-ready, ant-vibration design, advanced video streaming with Netflix and RSS feeds, and BD-Live, coming in the first quarter of 2010 for $499. This will work well with the new BD-MPC41U 5.1-channel system, pumping out 1050W and built-in iPod dock, in February 2010 for $799.

In the video below you can see a demo of just how good this looks, on the very left hand side is last years model where the colours and definition do not look as crisp.



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36 Comments

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All these news lately makes it look like technology is advancing faster than we manage to adopt technology. Jeez, most of the content available today is not even full hd (talking globally and not just in the U.S), why jump so quickly??

well i guess its good, HD becomes cheaper and cheaper and soon i'll be able to afford one

I would suspect that the reason they must be at those specific sizes is that they are wasting 25% more pixel space with the added color? I'll just stick with plasma for as long as I can. Much less motion blurr, and more color.

With the advent of direct transmit LED's (no backlight), I'm wondering how long it will be until they try
CMY or CMYK for LED screens. Traditionally, RGB has been used for transmitted light, and CMYK has
been used for reflected light. Any guru's got any ideas on that one?

naap51stang said,
With the advent of direct transmit LED's (no backlight), I'm wondering how long it will be until they try
CMY or CMYK for LED screens. Traditionally, RGB has been used for transmitted light, and CMYK has
been used for reflected light. Any guru's got any ideas on that one?

RGB are additive primaries with light, i.e. add all three together and you get white light. CMY are subtractive primaries used for printing, i.e. adding all three together will make "black".

petroid said,

RGB are additive primaries with light, i.e. add all three together and you get white light. CMY are subtractive primaries used for printing, i.e. adding all three together will make "black".

Yes, I realize that...hince the statement "transmitted light & reflected light"
Just because RGB equal amounts give you white & CMY(in the pure form)
give you black (black is added otherwise you (on printing) get muddy brown)
who's to say these guys will figure out a way to use CMY(K) for screens?

arent the human eye photoreceptors Red , Green and Blue ? so wouldnt it be more accurate to have colours which address those photoreceptors directly, rather than having to indirectly blend them from CMY ?

Wow More BS and lies every day just like the frame emulation they put in 120hz 240 hz tvs that they could easily put in a 60hz tv as well that adds fake higher frames per second

What's the point, just set the Red and Green channels to full intensity and bam, yellow pixel.

The only extra type of sub-pixel I see that could be useful to add would be an actual emmisive white pixel, so you could brighten parts of an image per pixel. But even that's questionable in it's worth.

They didn't "make up" pixels. Currently to make yellow you have to equally light two LEDs which uses more power and is less accurate.

I'm unsure as to why Magenta and Cyan were not also featured however - it may be the difficulty in placing more and more pixels together so they chose just one for now, maybe in a few more years we will see 7 colours.

i think the Yellow is there because their Red and Green LED's arent accurate enough to blend yellow properly.... and human eyes are less sensitive to blue, so there's no need for Magenta and Cyan

lt8480 said,
They didn't "make up" pixels. Currently to make yellow you have to equally light two LEDs which uses more power and is less accurate.

Again, I don't believe this is correct. This is an LED backlight. The pixels and colors are LCDs which filter the white light to generate different colors. You don't blend LEDs. The LEDs have monochromatic UV emission (probably 365nm or so).

DClark said,
So they tuned down the saturation and said "job's done for the decade."

And you are able to judge how much better this looks through your good old RGB screen.... I'm impressed =) Perhaps you can also tell us how good HDTV looks on a regular SDTV?

I really don't see how anybody can make up their mind about these new screens without watching them through their own eyes, instead of old monitors. Even the article author mentions that the videos demonstrate "how good this looks". How is that possible?

Just a thought.

_peder_ said,
And you are able to judge how much better this looks through your good old RGB screen.... I'm impressed =) Perhaps you can also tell us how good HDTV looks on a regular SDTV?

I really don't see how anybody can make up their mind about these new screens without watching them through their own eyes, instead of old monitors. Even the article author mentions that the videos demonstrate "how good this looks". How is that possible?

Just a thought.

That's what I was thinking....

The compound of loss is amazing. Starting wtih the Camera, retouching, compression, if the image has an embedded icc profile, if your browser supports the icc profile, monitor calibration, quality of monitor....

first you need the tvs for them to even consider making content specific for this kind of technology.
This would be a nice comeback for Sharp. They are a bit back behind Samsung imo right now.

Cool I guess. If most content is edited to look great on a standard RGB tv I do not see the point. Is there really "more color" in a standard Blu Ray that is not being displayed?

Assuming one uses a computer to edit, with a nice professional series monitor, you are limited by the sRGB space.

24-bit truecolor 16,777,216 colors (256 x 256 x 256)

Where is this billion and trillion coming from. I am not quite sure.

Intelman said,
Where is this billion and trillion coming from. I am not quite sure.

At a guess I'd say they're counting all the potential colours from all the pixels in the entire display, not a single pixel.

Marketing spin at work.

24-bit (8 bits per colour) results in 256 possible values per colour. So yes 8 bit per colour RGB will yield 16,777,216 colours.

But many LED monitors to my understanding have 32-bit with the inclusion of a white LED - still 8 bits per colour. (Which is why the old myth that white on a LED monitor uses more electric is wrong... it actually uses less than most colours as only one LED is lit rather than all 3). So 32-bit truecolour gives 4,294,967,296

The inclusion of yellow presumably makes this 40-bit - still 8 bits per colour. Which then gives 1,099,511,627,776 colours.

Ideally you would perhaps have 8 bits per colour with RGB then adding YMC to compliment it making it possible to create pure YMC colours without having to simulate it using two fully powered LEDs (better colour less power) similarly going back to why white LEDs exists in monitors.

Alternatively or additionally you can have more bits per colour too!

lt8480 said,
24-bit (8 bits per colour) results in 256 possible values per colour. So yes 8 bit per colour RGB will yield 16,777,216 colours.

But many LED monitors to my understanding have 32-bit with the inclusion of a white LED - still 8 bits per colour. (Which is why the old myth that white on a LED monitor uses more electric is wrong... it actually uses less than most colours as only one LED is lit rather than all 3). So 32-bit truecolour gives 4,294,967,296

The inclusion of yellow presumably makes this 40-bit - still 8 bits per colour. Which then gives 1,099,511,627,776 colours.

Ideally you would perhaps have 8 bits per colour with RGB then adding YMC to compliment it making it possible to create pure YMC colours without having to simulate it using two fully powered LEDs (better colour less power) similarly going back to why white LEDs exists in monitors.

Alternatively or additionally you can have more bits per colour too!

I think you are wrong. You get 32 bits only if the colors are independent which is not the case when you have RGB + White (you can get #14r,15g,16b color using #14r,15b,16b,00w as well as #04r,05g,06b,10w etc). So you don't have much more combinations. If the oputput is capped to 256 level you have your old 24bits (And I think that it's capped because you'd have problems with contrast). Even if the output is not capped you get less than 1 additional bit per color (since you cannot get 0 red and 512 green). The actual anuber of uncapped colors is: 255*(1 + 3*255+3*255*255)+256*256*256 ~ 2^25.99 - less than 26bits

RealFduch said,
I think you are wrong. You get 32 bits only if the colors are independent which is not the case when you have RGB + White (you can get #14r,15g,16b color using #14r,15b,16b,00w as well as #04r,05g,06b,10w etc). So you don't have much more combinations. If the oputput is capped to 256 level you have your old 24bits (And I think that it's capped because you'd have problems with contrast). Even if the output is not capped you get less than 1 additional bit per color (since you cannot get 0 red and 512 green). The actual anuber of uncapped colors is: 255*(1 + 3*255+3*255*255)+256*256*256 ~ 2^25.99 - less than 26bits

i think these new screens will be RGB + white + yellow ... as i see it, having yellow in there will allow you to calibrate the display to more accurately dislay RGB data... like you could use the Yellow to interpolate the Red and Green colours in different ways , and fix the Blue colour
maybe thats where the '1 trillion colours' claim comes from, you wont get all of them at once from an RGB signal, but the colours are there when you need them

lt8480 said,
Ideally you would perhaps have 8 bits per colour with RGB then adding YMC to compliment it making it possible to create pure YMC colours without having to simulate it using two fully powered LEDs (better colour less power) similarly going back to why white LEDs exists in monitors.

lt8480, do you really know what you are talking about? (real question)

This is an LED-backlight LCD display. No matter what the pixel color, the LEDs output full power capacity (based on overall TV brightness).

I am a electrical engineer with a background in optics so I know a little about this.

The LED is typically a GaN diode which has near-UV light emission and then they use a white phosphor to generate white light. This powers the entire broad-area TV backlight. Then they put patterned liquid crystal filters in front to generate the different color and pixels. There are not multi-colorn or multi-pixel LEDs in these TVs. The pixels are the LCDs and only act as whitelight filters. The white pixels are LCD pixels with no color filter. None of this should affect power consumption.

Anyway, these display have somewhat proprietary technology so probably only Sharp knows exactly how they work.