ChevronWP7 pulls up its tent and closes down

In June 2011, the team behind ChevronWP7 announced that it had received approval from Microsoft to enable Windows Phone app developers to unlock their handsets and run programs not available on the Windows Phone Marketplace. The program was officially released in November for $9.

However, it looks like the great experiment in an authorized "jailbreak" app for Windows Phone has come to an early end. In a post on the ChevronWP7 web site, the team states:

Our data indicates that most developers simply unlocked their devices for non-developmental reasons and never went all the way to publish an app in the marketplace. There was also some confusion about the actual purpose of the ChevronWP7 service – some folks thought we provided SIM-unlock capabilities, while others thought we were a hacker group providing full root access. On top of this, there were a larger than expected number of support emails.

The good news is that Microsoft has agreed to give everyone who purchased the ChevronWP7 unlock a free one year membership to the company's official Windows Phone App Hub. The site also says that the team will continue to work with Microsoft, saying, "All sides are still very interested in the hobbyist and homebrew developer communities."

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Paided?

Microsoft was well aware of what the app could do and was allowing them to continue developing it. Why would MS just turn around one day and pay them to stop?

htcz said,
Heres hoping that the news comes out saying the amount that Microsoft paided them...

WPChevron had to buy the unlock keys in batches from MS.
MS probably made the next batch prohibitively expensive.

Not the right terminology, I know.... however it's still true.
The first batch was to add 10k devices.

ahhell said,
Paided?

Microsoft was well aware of what the app could do and was allowing them to continue developing it. Why would MS just turn around one day and pay them to stop?


Because

A) They got greedy
B) They found new ways that their Store could get pirated and shut it down before release

and to shut them up, pay them off and close down shop. Pretty simple.

"Our data indicates that most developers simply unlocked their devices for non-developmental reasons and never went all the way to publish an app in the marketplace."
---
Um so, wasn't that the really the whole point? Get dev and sideload access for apps you didn't really want to publish in the market place or that might not be approved for one reason or another and to be able to do so for 9$ (once) and not $99 a year?

Pretty clear what's going on here.


Apart from developers who is gonna know about this unlock or care anyway. Its not like you could change the square tiles into triangular ones or stuff like that. Most ppl JB there iPhones to fully customize the boring ass look of the phone and seeing how ya can't do that on WP unlock then not much point for most users

Will this prevent non-developers from getting interop unlock?
That's the real issue.

Real users having interop unlock is the doorway to viruses on WP.

micro$oft either paid them off or they finally realized there is no need for a jailbreak for these devices with such a small user base. either way it's not good news but i expected it considering this OS has been out for 2 years with barley any "real" development.

Anyone that bought the "unlock" app gets a free year with Microsoft's official dev environment.
How the **** is that a bad thing? Nice attempt at trolling though. Next time try using some punctuation.

The site also says that the team will continue to work with Microsoft [...]

Makes you wonder how much M$ paid them (or is paying them : )...

Thats not good, to me it says that generally there is not enough interest in WP7 to continue. If there was enough interest there would be more information and the issues about what ChevronWP7 actually did would not exist.

Why support a jailbreak for a platform that jailbreakers are not interested in.

derekaw said,
Thats not good, to me it says that generally there is not enough interest in WP7 to continue. If there was enough interest there would be more information and the issues about what ChevronWP7 actually did would not exist.

Why support a jailbreak for a platform that jailbreakers are not interested in.

It wasn't a jail break? It didn't let you outside of Microsoft's application sandbox any more than a normal developer. It just let you sideload applications, which developers use to test their apps. Also, a big reason the Chevron Team stopped was because there was only 3 of them, and there was far too much support requests for them to reasonably handle...

There are a couple apps on xda that are not in the store yet and may never be that I love, which is why I did the jailbreak in the first place. Not all of us want to be developers, we just want the power to install whatever the **** we feel like and not just the apps the Microsoft approves. I'll be sad to see Chevron go. For the moment I'm fine, as my phone is unlocked, but if I ever have to reset my phone or I buy a newer/better model I'll be screwed...

Find someone with a .edu email or look on xda for the random university in Arizona that gives them out lol.

Then go to dreamspark and make an account using it, and then you can create an apphub membership for free.

Well then. Now we get to see if another group comes in and picks up where they left off. Either way, MS certainly did a good job in muting the JB effects by inviting them in and limiting it, rather than trying Apple's whack-a-mole approach.

Is there enough interest left in jailbroken windows phones, or has MS gotten everyone happy with using stock?

It wasn't even a jailbreak, considering you're still stuck entirely in the normal application sandbox. It was just a normal developer sideload unlock, nothing more.