Chrome 31 jumps ahead of IE10 in latest useage share data; IE11 surges up to 10 percent [Update]

Research firm Net Applications collects data on browser use from a small set of web sites, using unique visitors as the main basis for its numbers. Using that data, it has consistently showed that Microsoft's Internet Explorer 10 was ahead of the latest version of Google's Chrome browser, which is updated much more frequently.

Today, Net Applications released its numbers for December 2013 and it indicated a very surprising result. Chrome 31, the newest version of the browser, claimed 15.15 percent of the worldwide browser share and came in second place overall. IE10 came in third at 10.55 percent for the month while IE11, which launched just a few months ago, had a market share of 10.01 percent for December.

The main reason for this change is because more people switched from IE10 to IE11 last month, thanks in part to automatic updates for the browser. However, Chrome 31 still claimed the biggest monthly market share of all of Google's browser versions in 2013. So while it benefited from the switch from IE10 to IE11 in December, Chrome 31 did very well on its own.

IE8 is still the most used browser in the world, and Net Applications showed that it held onto a 19.6 percent market share in December. The Internet Explorer family still has the highest overall share of web browser use, with 55.06 percent in December. Chrome was second overall with 18.97 percent and Mozilla's Firefox was third with 18.46 percent.

Update: It looks like Net Applications has posted some revised numbers for December since this article was first written. While their positions on the charts remain the same, IE8's new numbers show it had 20.64 percent of the browser market in December, with Chrome 31 coming in second at 12.88 percent. IE10 was third with 11.05 percent, IE11 was fourth at 10.42 percent and IE9 was fifth at 8.96 percent.

Source: Net Applications | Image via Net Applications

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What utterly awful market research. Where were the samples from "two websites" taken? What were the websites? Were they English-only websites or did they include Chinese - which is larger than all Europe and North America combined? Talk about skewing.

Here in Asia I've NEVER seen anyone use Chrome. Google is completely and utterly dead and buried RIP in China. So I don't see how Chrome could approach anywhere near these numbers if the market research wasn't done so poorly.

"Chrome jumps ahead"... really? more like one version of IE fell back in exchange for a newer version of IE.

And btw, I see 12.88% for Chrome 31 on December vs 12.71% combined on November, while the combined IE 10+11 went from 17.5% to 21.47%

Nice try Chrome fanboy.

Thats normal... Google is adding chrome ads to their pages and forcing silent chrome installs through malware like bundling to freeware apps...

Come on Neowin are you really that desperate for hits? While its true that Chrome is ahead of one particular version of IE, it means absolutely nothing. The latest version of IE increases at the expense of an older version. What is the point of comparing this older version to all of Chrome? You could also say that Chrome is ahead of IE1.0 by 2000%. Shocker!!!

Pretty much this and also if you add up all the versions of IE it's a 51% which means IE is still beating Chrome and Firefox. What's even more interesting is that Firefox has actually passed Chrome again with 14% of the market share.

No, he's right. The numbers in the article don't match the numbers in the source for the article.

The article overstates Chromes marketshare by a couple percent, and understantes IE's marketshare by a good chunk.

Studio384 said,
Perhaps you've got filters active?

nope, my numbers are correct, as the article was edited to reflect the true numbers.

Chrome 31 was the reason I switched to Internet Explorer 11 because the stupid thing kept freezing up randomly on webpages. Seems to be only on my laptop though, and I have no idea why. I've also discovered that Internet Explorer 11 is BLAZING fast! Gonna keep using IE 11 until Chrome can fix it's font rendering, it's resource usage, support for higher DPI, and so on.

Looking forward the day when IE8 usage share drops in the single digits. The web will be a much better place. Yeah there are things like Modernizr, Respond.js and polyfills but not everyone uses them... Microsoft should've added auto update starting with IE7

Automatic Updating has been available for IE for over a decade, it's called Windows Update. The difference is Microsoft never forced the update through, it required users to opt-in to it. There are plenty of good reasons for this, because unlike Chrome, IE is used by much more than just IE, it's a fundamental part of Windows, and many 3rd party programs also use its engine.

Ideas Man said,
Automatic Updating has been available for IE for over a decade, it's called Windows Update. The difference is Microsoft never forced the update through, it required users to opt-in to it. There are plenty of good reasons for this, because unlike Chrome, IE is used by much more than just IE, it's a fundamental part of Windows, and many 3rd party programs also use its engine.

I am well aware IE has been available via WU but it's not the same hence why IE8 still has such large market share

Ideas Man said,
Automatic Updating has been available for IE for over a decade, it's called Windows Update. The difference is Microsoft never forced the update through, it required users to opt-in to it. There are plenty of good reasons for this, because unlike Chrome, IE is used by much more than just IE, it's a fundamental part of Windows, and many 3rd party programs also use its engine.

I am well aware IE has been available via WU but it's not the same hence why IE8 still has such large market share

Obry said,

I am well aware IE has been available via WU but it's not the same hence why IE8 still has such large market share

It's because XP's last supported IE browser is IE8.

I don't understand, what is the criteria for an article to be front-page at Neowin? One very specific version of a browser is used more than another very specific version of a browser? Really?

VictorWho said,
This is just for Windows computers, right? Chrome is also on Macs.

Might want to click the source link and look at the OS field.

Just curious, if this is a "small set of web sites", what makes it significant, and especially relevant to "worldwide" numbers? Is this maybe misworded or what, because it seems self contradicting.

It's usually stated because StatCounter, another data source for web browser usage, is derived from a significantly larger raw data set than Net Applications and the graphs look very different between the two.

Well at least doesn't connect to Google's Adsense every time I load a page, that make me feel like I'm really been watched. Even though I know that the revenue is going now to the Iron devs.

If you know some way to disable Adsense in Chrome or all the heavily d*mn traffic to the google servers, please let me know and I will stop using and promoting Iron.

Well, never heard of Comodo Dragon, looks like a good alternative to Chrome. I think i will give a shot to that browser, thanks eddman!

I've already been using AdBlock for a very long time, and Ghostery did the job blocking Adsense and Google Analytics. And for now, I'm back to the latest Chrome.

I tried Epic browser, but I think it's not for me, sometimes the extensions are really useful and makes your browsing experience a joy.

Also I don't use Google search anymore (well sometimes encrypted.google.com), Two months ago I switched to https://duckduckgo.com/

Thanks for the suggestions!

"that make me feel like I'm really been watched"

You are being watched all the time - and not just by Google Chrome

Since you have no freedoms anyway, you might as well use the best browser.

It's not, really. They're dropping the whole -webkit rule system and will start implementing new standards directly.

If you code something in Chrome you can be sure it works in Firefox, Safari, Android, iOS and recent IE's. And on top of that Chrome has excellent developer tools.

Ambroos said,
It's not, really. They're dropping the whole -webkit rule system and will start implementing new standards directly.

If you code something in Chrome you can be sure it works in Firefox, Safari, Android, iOS and recent IE's. And on top of that Chrome has excellent developer tools.

IE came around to support standards too, so the comparison is still apt.

Athernar said,
Ah Chrome, the modern day equivalent of IE6.

I don't know about it being that bad but I will never use it again!! Chrome, that is.

Ambroos said,
It's not, really. They're dropping the whole -webkit rule system and will start implementing new standards directly.

If you code something in Chrome you can be sure it works in Firefox, Safari, Android, iOS and recent IE's. And on top of that Chrome has excellent developer tools.


Its font rendering is still ****.

the better twin said,

Its font rendering is still ****.

In your opinion. Give me the classic old ClearType over the blurry mess IE is. Especially in Windows 8 and up.

DirectWrite is coming to Chrome too, already working in the Dev builds.

Ambroos said,

In your opinion. Give me the classic old ClearType over the blurry mess IE is. Especially in Windows 8 and up.

DirectWrite is coming to Chrome too, already working in the Dev builds.


Theres no opinion. Chromes rendering of webfonts is downright diabolical. Just search for "chrome webfonts ugly" for a multitude of complaints/ webdevs coming up with various "hacks" to fix it.
Good to hear there is a proper fix coming though.

the better twin said,

Theres no opinion. Chromes rendering of webfonts is downright diabolical. Just search for "chrome webfonts ugly" for a multitude of complaints/ webdevs coming up with various "hacks" to fix it.
Good to hear there is a proper fix coming though.

Yeah, that is true. As a web dev that's bothered me too in the past but it seems to have been fixed in recent versions - even without DirectWrite.

fobban said,

Care to elaborate or are you just trolling?

Have you ever looked at the -webkit-code for popular -webkit-websites?

Lots of -webkit-webkit -webkit-prefixes because the -webkit-engine is trash that only ever implements bare minimum support for new standards to tick boxes.

However, Chrome 31 still claimed the biggest monthly market share of all of Google's browser versions in 2013. So while it benefited from the switch from IE10 to IE11 in December, Chrome 31 did very well on its own.

The new opera browsers also report as chrome 31 since they're based off chrome. Though it probably only accounts for like 1-2% at most.

IE needs to do a better job having an in house update system like Chrome. That will solve fragmentation problems.

Is it because of legacy websites? I'm not a dev., so i wouldn't know.

ccoltmanm said,
IE needs to do a better job having an in house update system like Chrome. That will solve fragmentation problems.

Is it because of legacy websites? I'm not a dev., so i wouldn't know.

IE is built into Windows so you would need to upgrade Windows to use the latest version. Also, each version of IE only supports to the current and previous versions of Windows.

Chrome and every other browser doesn't have this problem.

night_stalker_z said,

IE is built into Windows so you would need to upgrade Windows to use the latest version.

What do you mean? Windows 7 comes with IE8 and you can install 9, 10 or 11; no problem.

night_stalker_z said,

IE is built into Windows so you would need to upgrade Windows to use the latest version. Also, each version of IE only supports to the current and previous versions of Windows.

Chrome and every other browser doesn't have this problem.

You have the wrong idea here. For a long time a new version of IE would be released with a new version of Windows but that's changed. IE is on a yearly release cycle, MS does however only support the 2 newest Windows versions with IE. So no IE11 for Vista and older but that's not saying much. IE12 I expect will come in 2014 with the first update to Windows 8.1 that is rumored to be on the way with a Windows 7 version late in the year like we had with v11 this time.

ccoltmanm said,
IE needs to do a better job having an in house update system like Chrome. That will solve fragmentation problems.

Is it because of legacy websites? I'm not a dev., so i wouldn't know.

I think IE11 is the first one to have it's own built in update feature. We'll see how it does with IE12 later.

ccoltmanm said,
IE needs to do a better job having an in house update system like Chrome. That will solve fragmentation problems.

Is it because of legacy websites? I'm not a dev., so i wouldn't know.


Since IE9 IE updates have been pretty much automatic, and starting with 11 (10? I forget) it has it's own automatic updating feature built in to the browser like Chrome. That's probably why IE11 already has so much market share

IE10 is the first IE to have a working preference for automatic upgrade.

People found traces of this system in IE9 but it wasn't enabled.

George P said,

I think IE11 is the first one to have it's own built in update feature. We'll see how it does with IE12 later.

No, that feature is introduced in IE10, anyway eveyr IE since version 6 should be updated automaticaly by Windows Update since begin 2012.

eddman said,

What do you mean? Windows 7 comes with IE8 and you can install 9, 10 or 11; no problem.

But Windows 7 was either the current or the previous version of Windows when IE 8-11 came out.

The funny thing about IE is that so many users will pull their hair out and go to extreme lengths to make sure it DOESN'T update itself.

I've been asked in the past to 'fix' computers for people, and I'll go through and update components where it makes sense. Whenever I've updated IE, though, I can only describe the reaction I get from the PC's owner as 'despair'. It's like I just killed their childhood puppy, the crime is so big.

fredrichman said,

because it match with what others has being saying Shareaholic and even google said chrome is the most popular browser. dont tell me google dont know how to do stats.. they are that kind of company

Seriously? You're going to take Google's word for it? You know, the company behind Chrome?

Nothing against Google, but they aren't unbiased in this situation.

fredrichman said,
for some reason i dont trust netstat. statcounter is much more reliable http://gs.statcounter.com/
Why? Market share should be the % of PCs that's using a browser, and that's not how StatCounter counts, NetApplications is doing a better job by simply counting 1 person just once, not 1000 times.

fredrichman said,

because it match with what others has being saying Shareaholic and even google said chrome is the most popular browser. dont tell me google dont know how to do stats.. they are that kind of company

http://thenextweb.com/apps/201...-opera-combined/#!q6D7V


You know the Net Applications numbers above are limited to desktop browsers, right? Why are you linking to an analysis that includes mobile? And measures a completely different metric?

There's a reason people are suggesting you're just picking the numbers that fit your preferred narrative. Granted, the same could be said for Net Apps. The only lesson here is that statistics can be tweaked to say all kinds of things. You just have to count the right thing, the right way, over the right period of time, and boom--anyone can be number one.