Citrix Nirvana phone is a thin client in your pocket

According to Slashgear, Citrix is hoping to change the way businessmen travel. The Nirvana phone is a low spec device with thin client like capabilities. Instead of sending someone out of town with a laptop, a company could give one of these phones, which could be used to access a virtual desktop back at work. The virtual desktop could be used on the phone itself, but preferably, the user would find a monitor with a Bluetooth mouse and keyboard to attach to the phone, making it a fully usable machine.

The phone will connect to a virtual environment via a Wi-Fi or 3G connection and will be able to output full HD video to a connected display via an HDMI or VGA connection. The platform requires, at least, an ARM 528MHz processor with 256MB of ROM and 192MB of RAM. Assuming the platform is implemented correctly, it would still allow phone calls and other basic phone functionality to work while using the Nirvana platform.

If employees frequently travel to places that have spare monitors and Bluetooth enabled peripherals (such as an out-of-town location of the company, or home), this platform may become the ideal way for their companies to keep them connected while away from the office. The platform will have the ability to run on Windows Mobile, Android, Symbian, and perhaps even iPhone OS. Citrix is currently working with certain, undisclosed, handset manufacturers to try and get Nirvana into the market by the end of the year.

Here's a video of it in action:

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15 Comments

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I really don't see the point to this. I would say the majority of keyboard and mice are not bluetooth,and the pairing of the devices would be a pain. First you would need to pair the mouse and keyboard with the phone, then grab the monitor cable out from whatever it is in. Then after using it, the keyboard and mice would need to be paired to the PC again, assuming most bluetooth keyboard and mice can only pair to one device each. And chances are, when you go out, there is unlikely to be a monitor, keyboard and mouse already set up for this and not plugged in to anything else or being used by someone. It also means you can't go and use it anywhere, like a board meeting or outside of a cafe or on a train etc.

Xilo said,
What's the point if you still need to hookup to a monitor to make it usable?

I would have to agree. While its neat it doesn't look like any sort of break through. GotomyPC looks like something that would be far more useful as everyone carries a laptop and free wifi is everywhere.

Xilo said,
What's the point if you still need to hookup to a monitor to make it usable?

Portability, cost of the device it self, issues with theft or loss of the laptop. Losing a laptop is worse than losing a mobile phone. More costly and you lose the data with it, too. There's encryption, and laptop tracking services yeah but they cost money and time to implement, maintain, etc.

Edited by Harreh, Feb 2 2010, 6:35pm :

Xilo said,
What's the point if you still need to hookup to a monitor to make it usable?

So all other phones are even less usable because you cannot even hook them up to a monitor?

RealFduch said,

So all other phones are even less usable because you cannot even hook them up to a monitor?

I think you've failed to read the article. This is a phone device meant to operate as a thin client. This means it's meant as a portable remote desktop device. Current phones are not made for this intended purpose. Hence, they have no need to hook up to a monitor.


I was commenting on if you need to hook up to a monitor to make it remotely usable as a thin client, what's the purpose when you can just have a laptop that already has a screen/etc.

TL;DR: Your logic is fail.

Edited by Xilo, Feb 2 2010, 6:04pm :

Xilo said,
What's the point if you still need to hookup to a monitor to make it usable?

So I wouldn't have to carry a laptop back thru the airport when I travel for work. Looks very useful.

bruNo_ said,
wow... thought vmware would be the first one to make something like that.

Vmware is great for Virtual Machines locally on a PC. When it comes to remote desktop solution's, Citrix is king.

Edited by warwagon, Feb 2 2010, 6:31pm :

warwagon said,

Vmware is great for Virtual Machines locally on a PC. When it comes to remote desktop solution's, Citrix is king.

i'm going to implement vmware view 4 on the next few months, the new protocol bought by vmware called PCoIP sounds promising.
i really don't like citrix, i had too many problems with metaframe and stuff... btw, ICA protocol is excellent to remote connections.