Comcast to offer 105Mbps to residential customers

One wonders how such a thing would be useful to the average home user, but Engadget reports that Comcast may be preparing to offer cable speeds up to 105Mbps downstream 10Mbps upstream. According to information posted on a customer's recent bill, the service will be called Extreme 105, and will require the customer to purchase a special modem, the Arris WBM760, which, including installation, will cost you $249.00. The service itself will cost $199.95 per month, and will start June 1st. According to the Arris modem's product flyer, the device is specifically designed to compete with the residential VDSL and Fiber markets with the capability of providing up to 160Mbps download speeds.

Image courtesy of Engadget

The previous record holder for the fastest widely available cable service was Cablevision, at 101Mbps. It's possible that this is a move by Comcast against the risk of Verizon possibly doubling their FiOS speeds to 100Mbps, according to Electronista. However, even with this record-breaking residential-tier speed, residential Comcast customers are currently hobbled by a 250GB data cap. There has been no word about Comcast lifting this cap for future Extreme 105 customers, but it's pretty clear that properly utilizing a 105Mpbs connection would cause you to hit that cap pretty quickly.

Another threat that Comcast may be worrying about is Google's promised gigabit fiber per network. As of now, they are going through government and citizen submissions for service to try and pinpoint the ideal markets to start their trial. Their vision is a national gigabit broadband network, competitively prices, and universally available. If they can make this viable, it will be a huge hit to ISPs everywhere, and this sudden speed ramp-up by Comcast may be a preliminary round of damage control on the chance that Google's ISP actually comes to fruition.

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Geeze, broadband is expensive in the US Here in Sweden I pay about $30 for 100/100 with no cap. And my landlord has put in fiber so don't need any modem or router, just plug it in and swooosh.

JakeSWE said,
Geeze, broadband is expensive in the US Here in Sweden I pay about $30 for 100/100 with no cap. And my landlord has put in fiber so don't need any modem or router, just plug it in and swooosh.
Sheesh, sweden has everything, Cheap broadband, fiber, The pirate bay... I might just come over

Auzeras said,
Sheesh, sweden has everything, Cheap broadband, fiber, The pirate bay... I might just come over

If that's expensive I wonder what would you call this, I pay 52 US Dollars for a 512/128Kbps ADSL connection.

I've yet to hit the cap, but I'm on the 16/2 service - best my area offers. I'm curious how many sites can even offer speeds that fast. In the future it will be useful, but unless you are a very high tech house, with multiple systems all trying to run data intensive apps then you'll simply be paying for more speed than you need.

That being said...when something faster is available to me, I'll get it. Still waiting on DOCSIS3.

But it sucks that Comcast will double triple quadruple their price.
Yeah also that bandwidth cap is killer of this fast speed too.
But currently got no choice but Comcast...
Hope for Google!

*sigh* Some of use only have the option to go with Comcast. I hate the company, but seeing as where I live Verizon doesn't want to come here, guess I'm stuck with it, less I spend a couple grand to move just over Internet.

Thought my city did op for Google's 1Gb/s so just maybe *crosses fingers*

Why the hell do their residential plans have these great upload speeds but running servers on them is banned... and their business plans require you to get the most expensive option to even have any decent upload speeds.

And then Verizon goes and decides not to build out their network here in New Jersey for a while.

Lol, well I bet in the states you don't pay for your cell phone, your cell phone plan, and also pay $8 a month on top of all the other fees for 'system access' to the towers to use the cell phone with the plan you are paying for right??

cable providers already have all provisions in place.. its just the headend that needs to be updated with newer gear for higher speeds. The nodes are not overloaded. the server can support X amount of clients at full speed. The provider adds X+1 to the node and limits the rates though instead of upgrading....

Like most have said, what good are those speeds with a cap? Also, speeds like that and still a lame ass up? Man, if I had any alternatives I would switch from this company so fast it would make your head spin.

Haha, in New Zealand our Government is only letting us have fibre in the next 6 years. the BEST you would get here is about 10-20MB/s and that would be on some horribly expensive plan with about 20GB data cap costing you about $150. yet the rest of you are kicking up a stink about 250GB at 100+MB/s for $100. grow up, your'e lucky as it is.

Great, everyone who can get this needs to get it! Why? All the damn cable/DSL providers in the US are whining how their nodes are getting overloaded with people hoovering bandwidth. If everyone in a particular city bought this service, wonder what it will do to the nodes? Then you'll really hear them whining!

ir0nw0lf said,
Great, everyone who can get this needs to get it! Why? All the damn cable/DSL providers in the US are whining how their nodes are getting overloaded with people hoovering bandwidth. If everyone in a particular city bought this service, wonder what it will do to the nodes? Then you'll really hear them whining!

It wouldn't be as bad as you think. Comcast freed up a LOT of bandwidth when they discontinued their analog broadcasts, which they are now using for the 105Mbit service.

Edited by BillDozer357, May 26 2010, 8:59pm : grammar correction

Screw ComCrap. I have Verizon FiOS. I have the 25/15 package, and I pay $60/month.
Upload speed help tremendously, even when downloading.
They also have 50/20 for $140.

I think they are just going for that to say they have the fastest internet in the country. Cablevision's Optimum Online currently has it at 101Mbps (cuz someone was already doing 100Mbps so they upped theres to 101! ) Comcast now is just trying to push theirs.

That installation charge is a rip off however as i don't see what special they need to do. Their junction boxes or taps should all be updated. That's unless they need to run a seperate line just for the internet as copper would be tapped for bandwidth with all the HD/Analog streams still there.

SHoTTa35 said,
That installation charge is a rip off however as i don't see what special they need to do.

+1. I got into a heated "discussion" with Cox Cable recently over why they have to roll a truck for a full service call/charge out to install one or two CableCards. That's $20-$50 or so easy. Why can't *I* use my own gas, pick up the cards at the local office, bring 'em back, hook 'em up, call them for authorization, etc?

Talk about Comcast and some ridiculous pricing - I already pay the company $100+/mo for my cable and internet there would be no way I'd add another $150+ just for blazing speeds I'd never take full advantage of.

I think it's short sighted to say the average user would NEVER need 105mbit download speed. Just not yet.

I would have trouble finding any sites to even utilize that kind of speed. I think I have 25 down now with Fios and I have only seen 5-6 Mb per sec

jerzdawg said,
I would have trouble finding any sites to even utilize that kind of speed. I think I have 25 down now with Fios and I have only seen 5-6 Mb per sec

You could always use the net.

jerzdawg said,
I would have trouble finding any sites to even utilize that kind of speed. I think I have 25 down now with Fios and I have only seen 5-6 Mb per sec

Bit curious how you measured your download speed in megabits. Did you just take your regular DL speed and multiply it by 8? I've definitely seen speeds of roughly 2.7 MB (That's megabytes btw, so about 21,6 megabits) without a whole lot of issues... and on "Comcrap" as they call it.

Now, if you're talking megabytes, that's a whole different issue... as your connection speed would account for roughly 200 megabits/sec compared to Comcast's new 105 megabits/sec offer. To a person that downloads like crazy, such speeds are definitely going to be useful, as even if the sites they browse are slow, i.e. don't offer more than 5-6 MB/sec to an individual downloads, they can always toss 3-4 downloads to run at the same time and use up the full bandwidth.

But either way... to clear any confusion... connection speed is usually measured in megabits/sec while download speed is measured in megabytes/sec.

Biggest waste of money, might even make the Ipad look cute to buy.

The average user would never need speeds of 105mbps, (105/8) = approx 13-14MB/SEC download speed. The cost of installation alone is in my opinion a complete ripoff.

Not only that, but imagine what would happen if you went over your bandwidth (which i dont think is even mentioned...what is the bandwidth, unlimited, 30, etc?). Imagine your kid goes onto a torrent site, and sees that he/she can download pc games, xbox games which are about 5-12GB in under what, 8 minutes (i didnt do the math just a guess, but it sure isnt long at 13 MBPS).

Reminds me of the time someone got charged a ton and a half for streaming internet through his phone to watch a movie.

$199.95 for 105/10 Mbps with 250GB cap? And you have to buy a modem for $249? In Vancouver I could get 100/10 Mbps with 500GB cap for $170.95 and no cable modem is required (fibre optics) ... and 200/10 Mbps with 750GB cap for $268.95. Although the standard 20/10 Mbps with 110GB cap for $32.50 is sufficient for me. http://www.novusnow.ca/services/internet.php ... The Google 1 Gbps network should be nice though...

100 Mbit with 250GB limit? ****, I downloaded 250GB per month even back when we had a 2Mbit connection.

Living in the Netherlands is awesome: 50 Mbit, no limit, 63 euro per month including TV and Phone.

Dont see the point of a 105mbps connection for normal residents.

The 50mbps is more than enough even for those who download ALOT like me.

I just ditched Verizon DSL 3MB/786KB for Comcast 20MB/5MB. I'm not a fan of Comcast because their network is still shared network, your speed will be reduce if a lot people in your neighborhood is using it. I much rather have Verizon Fios. Unfortunately, it's not available where I live.

java2beans said,
I just ditched Verizon DSL 3MB/786KB for Comcast 20MB/5MB. I'm not a fan of Comcast because their network is still shared network, your speed will be reduce if a lot people in your neighborhood is using it. I much rather have Verizon Fios. Unfortunately, it's not available where I live.

Same here. I switched from Qwest DSL where I got 1.5mbps downstream. Qwest then gave me 3 free months of their 6mbps service, which (in reality) was more like 3mbps. I switched to Comcast 16mbps service, which is nominally 8mbps but I've seen it as high as 20mbps. I'm pretty happy with the service. The 250GB cap is kinda-lame but they have tool to allow you to monitor your usage and I've never come close. As more and more HD video streaming services pop-up (other than porn), I'm going to feel more and more uncomfortable with the 250GB cap.

8GB a day seems perfectly reasonable to me. Stupidly fast connections always seemed completly pointless to me as their only good if your downloading from multiple fast connections similtainiously and we all know what the majority of that practice is.

Unplugged said,
8GB a day seems perfectly reasonable to me. Stupidly fast connections always seemed completly pointless to me as their only good if your downloading from multiple fast connections similtainiously and we all know what the majority of that practice is.

no, it is not.
8gb a day in theory is a couple of dvd x day and it is reasonable.
but you can bet that you can use you quota simply downloading a single dvd.

Unplugged said,
8GB a day seems perfectly reasonable to me. Stupidly fast connections always seemed completly pointless to me as their only good if your downloading from multiple fast connections similtainiously and we all know what the majority of that practice is.

It isn't enough when you consider the possibility that HiDef TV could (and should) become an Internet streaming experience. 8GB would come and go rather fast.

Unplugged said,
8GB a day seems perfectly reasonable to me. Stupidly fast connections always seemed completly pointless to me as their only good if your downloading from multiple fast connections similtainiously and we all know what the majority of that practice is.

No caps imo are reasonable

for streaming HD service, 5Mbit would be plenty for a 720P stream with 5.1 DD. My local DSL provider streams 720p HD and it uses 3Mbit PER stb/channel. So if you had 5 dual-tuner stb's all recording something I guess you would need 24Mbit service for 'clear' streaming. They don't allow you to have more than 3 boxes total, and the SD uses something like .75-1Mbit.
I agree that esp in US where there is no analog service any longer why it don't go IP/digital like VoIP.

As for caps, 105Mbit service = 13.13MB/s so, 250GB = 256000MB

simple math, full speed connection would 'fill' your cap in under 6 Hr.

for those with 25Mbit service unlimited, you can get 8Tb per month.

Simple math for me

If they are going to cap any account, it should be 1 week of full speed as the cap so a 105Mbit line would achieve 7500Gb, a 25Mbit line would be 2000Gb, 5Mbit line would be 370Gb..

Unplugged said,
8GB a day seems perfectly reasonable to me. Stupidly fast connections always seemed completly pointless to me as their only good if your downloading from multiple fast connections similtainiously and we all know what the majority of that practice is.

That might seem fine for normal computer use, but computers are not the only thing that use the internet now. My BluRay player streaming Netflix in HD uses about 2.25GB an hour. A 3.5 hour movie and you just used 8GB, and that isn't even all that great looking HD. Imagine how much bandwidth a BluRay like stream would use...I'm guessing around 8-10GB an hour even with good compression.

Edited by sphbecker, May 26 2010, 9:13pm :

Magallanes said,

no, it is not.
8gb a day in theory is a couple of dvd x day and it is reasonable.
but you can bet that you can use you quota simply downloading a single dvd.

Exactly.... no Moral lesson aside but I bet you would have trouble finding 30 DVDs a month that are actually legal to download (or would need too). The market moves based on what the average customer uses. I can guarantee the "average" user uses far less than even half that cap and would be pretty willing to bet that its even a quarter a month.

Love or like caps without them particularity at this speed the service will just get raped. ISPs will always set caps at a good percentage higher that their average customers uses because they target their price based on an average. If they targeted their price on everyone using 1TB of data a month they I can guarantee you you will be paying more than double for your service now.

While im aware of the bandwidth uses of HD video this currently isn't the norm and if you need to stream 8meg HD videos then maybe go for a 10meg service around the same cost with a much more generous cap.

I hate caps too but they unfortunately are a necessary evil as no ISP can realisticlly deliver a 1:1 contention with no limits for the price of a home connection. Look at the cost of getting a dedicated pipe and you will find out exactly how much bandwidth costs.

when HDTV streaming and legal services pick up then the average users usage will also increase and the marker will adapt to reflect this. You can get pretty decent HD out of an 8meg stream (a fraction of this bandwidth) which will use

The 50mbps service would be fine enough for me. Though this would be nice to!

That 250GB Data Cap is murder though. I've hit it a few times, despite what they say they do (call you and essentially yell at you) they actually slow your internet down for a few months. That or someone at Comcast hates me.

DarkNovaGamer said,
The 50mbps service would be fine enough for me. Though this would be nice to!

That 250GB Data Cap is murder though. I've hit it a few times, despite what they say they do (call you and essentially yell at you) they actually slow your internet down for a few months. That or someone at Comcast hates me.

The data cap is what made us avoid their service. It'd be interesting though to see how that changes with this service because it would be so tempting to download so much at that speed that a 250GB cap would be really low. Hopefully that will change!

Edited by Tanshin, May 26 2010, 7:44pm :

Tanshin said,

The data cap is what made us avoid their service. It'd be interesting though to see how that changes with this service because it would be so tempting to download so much at that speed that a 250GB cap would be really low. Hopefully that will change!

If Verizon was still in my state (FairPoint took over... sigh) I'd just wait for FiOS but I don't see it coming to my area anytime in the next decade. Comcast owns our area, they are the only provider that isn't Dial-up or Satellite. No DSL in my area from anyone either.

Tanshin said,

The data cap is what made us avoid their service. It'd be interesting though to see how that changes with this service because it would be so tempting to download so much at that speed that a 250GB cap would be really low. Hopefully that will change!


I have a cap of 150GB per month with a crappy local company called Bend Broadband. They always boast being a good value, but to match the data with Comcast I'd pay an extra $150 a month in bandwidth overages. They are the only cable company in town, and I used to have Comcast in the Portland area. I'd rather have Comcast any day after having this horrible slow service. I'd probably never hit the data cap anyway with how slow the crap is.