Confusion over missing iPhone 5 prototype story continues

The already odd story based around a missing iPhone prototype just got odder. Earlier this week, news reports hit the Internet, based on unnamed sources, that an Apple employee lost a prototype of the company's upcoming iPhone 5 in a San Francisco bar in late July. The story was a near perfect repeat of what happened in March 2010 when another Apple employee lost an iPhone 4 prototype in nearby Redwood City, California. That phone eventually found its way to the tech site Gizmodo who wrote an extensive article based on examining the prototype.

The initial story claimed that Apple helped local police track down the location of the lost iPhone 5 prototype to a home in the Bernal Heights neighborhood. The story added that the phone didn't turn up at that location and that the unnamed man at the home denied he knew where it was. Later in the week, SF Weekly posted a story that cast some doubts on that story, reporting that representatives from the SFPD said that it had not received any reports of a missing iPhone prototype, nor did the SFPD help to search for the same phone. However, today SF Weekly posted up a follow up story, saying that the SFPD had reversed their stance. The organization now admits that "three or four" officers, along with two Apple security representatives, were indeed involved in the search of a Bernal Heights home for the iPhone 5 prototype. The officers actually stayed outside the home while the two Apple security personnel searched the residence.

Sergio Calderón, the now identified owner of that Bernal Heights home, says six people showed up at his door a few weeks ago claiming to be police officers. But only two of them actually searched his home, according to Calderón, and looked for the lost iPhone prototype. Calderón said neither of the two men who came inside his home gave any indication that they were Apple representatives and not police officers. One of them did give Calderón a card with his phone number. When SF Weekly called that number the person who answered said he was an Apple employee but would not comment further. Apple has still not commented on these reports.

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The officers actually stayed outside the home while the two Apple security personnel searched the residence.

Is that actually legal in the US? Wow.

He could have asked for search warrant! anyways there are billions of ways to hide a phone. Obviously he wont keep that **** in his closet, or drawer.
Also, he admitted that he was on that BAR where phone was lost the same night, which cant be just a co incidence that apple managed to trace out *THAT* home where HE lives

gulshan666 said,
He could have asked for search warrant! anyways there are billions of ways to hide a phone. Obviously he wont keep that **** in his closet, or drawer.
Also, he admitted that he was on that BAR where phone was lost the same night, which cant be just a co incidence that apple managed to trace out *THAT* home where HE lives

I wonder how Apple "traced" the device to a specific apartment unless this "prototype" used a special GPS system. The GPS devices used by regular users are not so accurate to pinpoint a location, military ones could but they also used more satellites to achieve such accuracy. On the other hands the iPhone is also a GSM device and as such it acts as a passive listening device even when the phone is shut down; normally people in confidential meetings take the battery off to block this functionality but the iPhone does not allow it. Of course there are other ways to block signals, like the ones used to block Lowjack devices but still the entire story is vry weird.
One thing is sure: I foresee a big lawsuit against Apple and the Police Dept. unless the matter will be resolved "privately".

Wait so Apple and Google are really trying to take over the world? First introduce their own laws with policing system then all the erst.

drazgoosh said,
Wait so Apple and Google are really trying to take over the world? First introduce their own laws with policing system then all the erst.

What does the Apple police have to do with Google? -.-

thealexweb said,
Isnt it a criminal offence to pretend to be a police officer? -.^

Depends if they mislead the guy or not I suppose. If he just assumed they were, I don't think thats Apple's fault.

Why the Police didn't do the searching however....

Andre said,
Nice way to stir up some buzz before the release.

I guess that would be a good theory... If it wasn't for the fact that even if this is some attempt to create some buzz/hype it can't compare to when they announce when they will have a keynote or what they announce during said keynote...

That's why I seriously doubt this is some kind of attempt to create hype it would just be a waste of their time and money

Leonick said,

I guess that would be a good theory... If it wasn't for the fact that even if this is some attempt to create some buzz/hype it can't compare to when they announce when they will have a keynote or what they announce during said keynote...

That's why I seriously doubt this is some kind of attempt to create hype it would just be a waste of their time and money

Exactly. Apple don't need to create hype it's done for them with people taking pictures of a 3GS and thinking it's a new iPhone etc.

They have all the worlds jounralists at the keynotes waiting to report on the new iPhone - they don't need any "pr stunts" as some people think..

DomZ said,

Exactly. Apple don't need to create hype it's done for them with people taking pictures of a 3GS and thinking it's a new iPhone etc.

They have all the worlds jounralists at the keynotes waiting to report on the new iPhone - they don't need any "pr stunts" as some people think..

this kind of publicity is aimed at and reaches a different audience, most people with an iphone don't know what a "keynote" is.