Content providers bringing HTML5 for iPhone OS users

As Apple prepares their stores for the iPad launch at the end of this week, more and more content providers are taking action to adjust for the ever increasing amount of iPhone OS users that won't have Flash to view their content. 

Brightcove announced today that they will be bringing HTML5 video through H.264 for their partners to seamlessly deliver video content to the iPhone, iPod Touch, and the iPad. Their largest partners, The New York Times and Time Magazine, are reported to already be on board to deliver video content to the aforementioned devices. Brightcove's solution will solve the "knowledge gaps, technical limitations, and additional development costs" that organizations will face when trying to deliver video and other rich media to iPhone OS users. Their current platform features automatic device detection, native HTML5 player templates, and optimized H.264 transcoding. 

TED's curator, Chris Anderson, also announced yesterday that a non-Flash version of their site is now live for iPhone OS users. iPhone, iPod Touch, and supposedly iPad users should now be able to watch videos, leave comments, and rate videos in Safari without needing the native TED app in the App store. 

CBS, one of the largest TV networks in the US, was also seen testing HTML5 video playback for iPhone OS devices last week. 

Apple's CEO Steve Jobs has been reported to be very vocal against the thought of Flash on any iPhone OS device. Reports surfaced earlier this year that Jobs personally attributed the slow and buggy Flash plugin on OS X to "lazy" Adobe developers and proclaimed that HTML5 is the way forward. He also claimed that the iPad's touted 10 hour battery life would be dwindled to 1.5 hours if they allowed Flash on the device.  

Adobe has stated that their upcoming Flash Player 10.1 will improve performance and efficiency greatly on mobile devices and that Mac OS X performance is also being worked on.

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33 Comments

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Why does the world have to make exceptions for apple and their products?

Other companies who try to force changes on people get a big bashing, Apple does it and everyone says "yes please can I have some more?"

Am I missing something?

Teebor said,
Why does the world have to make exceptions for apple and their products?

Other companies who try to force changes on people get a big bashing, Apple does it and everyone says "yes please can I have some more?"

Am I missing something?

Maybe because Apple is talking with most of the content contributors and discussing this ideas? It looks like they are really pushing force in this market. This iPod Touch, iPhone and iPad in several years they are going be dominant at least in the markets where the big money is generated. I think Apple is already number one in mobile market if we would look at revenue, isn't it?

In few words, looks like Apple is pushing the market and does it very good.

david13lt said,

Maybe because Apple is talking with most of the content contributors and discussing this ideas? It looks like they are really pushing force in this market. This iPod Touch, iPhone and iPad in several years they are going be dominant at least in the markets where the big money is generated. I think Apple is already number one in mobile market if we would look at revenue, isn't it?

In few words, looks like Apple is pushing the market and does it very good.

Doubt Apple is number 1.

In laptops, I don't think they're anywhere near Dell / HP. In cell phones, they're far away from Nokia.

Oddly enough people always forget about Nokia when talking about cell phones =/ I mean in America they aren't too popular as none of their good phones ever make it here, but the world as a whole they are hugely popular.

Teebor said,
Why does the world have to make exceptions for apple and their products?

Other companies who try to force changes on people get a big bashing, Apple does it and everyone says "yes please can I have some more?"

Am I missing something?


I'm not sure of the reasoning here - HTML5 is big nowadays, not just in Apple products. Since Safari happen to use WebKit which in turn provides good HTML5 support, I think this move is understandable. You won't see these news on Windows Mobile for example, because it's not bundled with a HTML5 capable browser.

Northgrove said,

I'm not sure of the reasoning here - HTML5 is big nowadays, not just in Apple products. Since Safari happen to use WebKit which in turn provides good HTML5 support, I think this move is understandable. You won't see these news on Windows Mobile for example, because it's not bundled with a HTML5 capable browser.

Most winmo phones come with Opera installed, which is a html5 capable browser.

Also, why does this have to be limited to phones only? What about desktops?

/- Razorfold said,

In cell phones, they're far away from Nokia.

Just because **** loads of people have a nokia, doesn't mean they go on the internet.
The latest mobile OS usage figures show 50% is iPhone, while only 18% is Nokia.
I live in Europe, and I personally don't know anybody who has a nokia and actually goes on the internet with it.

acnpt said,

Just because **** loads of people have a nokia, doesn't mean they go on the internet.
The latest mobile OS usage figures show 50% is iPhone, while only 18% is Nokia.
I live in Europe, and I personally don't know anybody who has a nokia and actually goes on the internet with it.

Actually if you went and checked on sites like statcounter you'll see like 40% is Symbian.

Either way that wasn't the point of my post.

Its not about support - its about codecs.

Atm the most prominent browser that dont support h264 is firefox, if you run chrome or safari you have that allready, and probably ie8/9 to. Im not to sure about opera (but they are used to beeing treated this way).

So its all about if FX will support h264 out of the box (support can be added by proprierty codec packs) or not..

jmkhenka said,
Its not about support - its about codecs.

Atm the most prominent browser that dont support h264 is firefox, if you run chrome or safari you have that allready, and probably ie8/9 to. Im not to sure about opera (but they are used to beeing treated this way).

So its all about if FX will support h264 out of the box (support can be added by proprierty codec packs) or not..

Its not that they don't want to support h.264, its that they can't due to the fact that they are an open source project, and can't work around the patent restrictions. The likelihood is that Firefox will prompt you to download an H.264 codec if you don't already have one, and point you where to get it, problem solved.

What happens to richer content like Youtube annotations and semi-interactive videos when we switch to HTML5?

Trong said,
What happens to richer content like Youtube annotations and semi-interactive videos when we switch to HTML5?

I'm interested in this too. The HTML5 Video tag is only a very basic video player, it will be interesting to see how YouTube (and others) go with this.

Majesticmerc said,

I'm interested in this too. The HTML5 Video tag is only a very basic video player, it will be interesting to see how YouTube (and others) go with this.


<video> is just another element, like <div>. You should be able to build most of the interactivity with other HTML elements, SVG, and Javascript.

MrA said,

<video> is just another element, like <div>. You should be able to build most of the interactivity with other HTML elements, SVG, and Javascript.

True, but what I meant is will they overlay, or will they redesign the pages to allow the extra content to be around the edges. How will embedding work too? The current flash based player can embed all the additional content, but the HTML5 content would be able to embed the video, but none of the other stuff.

Trong said,
What happens to richer content like Youtube annotations and semi-interactive videos when we switch to HTML5?

Hopefully that functionality will then all disappear.

Pc_Madness said,
Sigh, this is all going to end in tears. :\
To the YouTube lovers and/or Flash dedicated users, yeah...

Krome said,
To the YouTube lovers and/or Flash dedicated users, yeah...

I meant when H.264 becomes popular codec for HTML video but the other major browsers aren't willing to support it. :\

Pc_Madness said,

I meant when H.264 becomes popular codec for HTML video but the other major browsers aren't willing to support it. :\

By Other Major you mean Firefox, because IE, Chrome, and Safari already do.. I forget if Opera does, but I never care about Opera.

Joshie said,
LOL at the 1.5 hours thing. Because HTML5 video is six times more efficient, right?

Yeah, no doubt. Terrible dishonest comparison. I wouldn't be surprised if HTML5 video does better than Flash video in terms of battery life, but not THAT much better.

Joshie said,
LOL at the 1.5 hours thing. Because HTML5 video is six times more efficient, right?
Obviously you've never used Flash on a Mac, it's a resource pig, both memory and CPU, for even basic flash content.

If it was windows, I agree, it might be 10hrs, 9.5 with flash.. But having used Flash on Powermacs, and seen them on their knees because of it, 10 to 1.5 while a little bit of a stretch, wouldn't be ruled out on some sites.

Keep in mind, the amount that flash gets used. You dont want see see the battery dropping 1%/Minute for showing a "Punch the Monkey" Advert.

it may not be 6x more efficient, but it's 2x more efficient, and used only in places when you want it.

The Jambo said,
Keep in mind, the amount that flash gets used. You dont want see see the battery dropping 1%/Minute for showing a "Punch the Monkey" Advert.

it may not be 6x more efficient, but it's 2x more efficient, and used only in places when you want it.

Yeah, even at least 2x. YouTube with the HTML5 video player saves at least 2x the processing power of my Core i5 in Safari on the Mac. it's really that obvious in Activity Monitor.

This is good news, but why only the iPhone/iPad?

There are other phones that have browsers that support HTML5 and hence would equally benefit from this.

It'll likely work on other devices. It's just that Apple seem to be the driving force in the mobile market place as far as getting internet connections on peoples phones are concerned. They're not the first or only ones doing it, but I think they're the ones making the most noise.

Add to that the fact the iPads due soon and Apple has taken a very strong stance against Flash where other platforms will be getting it Apple really is the one driving this change IMHO for better or worse (Personally I'd like flash as an option still).

HTML standard was created for Safari.
MP3 was created for iPod.
Multitouch/GSM/3G was created for iPhone.
HTML5 was created for iPad.
Earth was created for Steeve Jobs.

NOT