Copyright infringing websites will have their ad-revenue cut

Digital Citizens Alliance - a group backed by rights holders, have concluded that the generated income from advertising on Piracy related sites could top $237 Million dollars each year. Even some of the smaller sites that provide this type of content could be making hundreds of thousands each year.

Most companies used advertising companies to enable them to get their adverts on hundreds of sites all at one time, but under new rules the Infringing Website List (IWL) will keep an up to date list of all copyright infringing websites that can be checked by the companies, in the hope that they will not put adverts on those sites. 

Detective Chief Inspector Andy Fyfe from the City of London Police Intellectual Property Crime Unit (Pipcu) said to the BBC, an advert appearing on a Pirate website gives the site a legitimate look, not only does this make the site look more attractive but the Advertising company are in fact funding online crime. The IWL also serves as a safety tool, to make sure that the advertising company and the brand company are not being associated with illegal websites.

Ernesto Van Der Sar from of Torrentfreak said, "As long as there is money to be made, there will be plenty of advertising companies who are happy to work with these sites."

Source: BBC | Image courtesy of Mando Gomez (aka Mandolux)‚Äč via Flickr

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15 Comments

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an advert appearing on a Pirate website gives the site a legitimate look, not only does this make the site look more attractive

No comment.

Ideas Man said,
Yeah, I had to laugh at that one too, considering the class of ads that tend to accompany the sites.

its indeed quite funny, many times i encounter ads from certain paid porn sites on pirates sites that offering contents from said porn sites for 'free'.

so, start charging the ad providers with funding crimes if they knowingly are doing it? If I was to knowingly fund a crime, I'd be in big trouble......

Shadowzz said,
Huh, this is not a crime in NL. Even though that the TPB is blocked.

in the countries that have it as a crime of course... if you are an ad provider in the USA giving ad rev to a known site that is against your laws then you are in trouble

neufuse said,
so, start charging the ad providers with funding crimes if they knowingly are doing it? If I was to knowingly fund a crime, I'd be in big trouble......

I think they come under the same law that allows companies like Google to index illegal sites and content until it's requested to be removed. A blanket law due to the wide spread and differing sites they provide for means they're not directly accountable for the use of their content.

Google for example, will automatically index all sites AND sites submitted to them. However they're not accountable for them directly. They will remove them if requested.
The same is said for Ad providers where the majority of their sites won't be illegally run, and if requested I'm sure they'd stop providing the ads to the site.
When it gets tricky is when sites such as the pirate bay are there for the sole purpose of providing content (links) to illegal material, or sites such as tvshows.cc or what ever it was where they provided links to TV shows, again they weren't illegally hosting it themselves, but their sole purpose was to facilitate the watching of content hosted illegally.

It get's more weird when you take into consideration sites like Youtube, who have pretty much every movie, TV show or music you want to watch or listen to, yet they remain up and running because the majority of their content is not illegal. Youtube have come under criticism in the last few years over DMCA take downs, to the point people who've written their own music are having their videos removed or ad revenue from videos passed to someone else who claimed copyright. But, this automated system is the the only way youtube can move forward if they don't want to be held accountable for copyright infringement directly... at least right now.

neufuse said,

in the countries that have it as a crime of course... if you are an ad provider in the USA giving ad rev to a known site that is against your laws then you are in trouble


I see plenty of Google ads on sites that are surely not according to US law :p

Just wanted to point out its not a crime in most countries. And this is the UK which recent years has gone absolutely bonkers when it comes to anything internet related.

-adrian- said,
How about they offer content and get this revenue themselves.. Who is actually generating this "list of sites" - Do they?

Spotify does it, more or less, for example.

Ernesto Van Der Sar from of Torrentfreak said, "As long as there is money to be made, there will be plenty of advertising companies who are happy to work with these sites

Not much to add, pretty much sums up business, ethical or not.