Corning unveils ultra-thin, flexible Willow Glass

Flexible smartphones just got a step closer to the mainstream (and maybe a step closer to the grandeur of Rome) with the unveiling of Corning's new Willow Glass, an incredibly flexible and ultra-thin new type of glass. What's truly impressive, though, is the way it's produced – roll to roll, rather than traditional sheet to sheet methods, as you can see in the video below.

Corning says Willow Glass could revolutionize the consumer electronics industry, leading not only to thinner devices, but flexible and more ergonomic handhelds, not to mention immersive curved displays.

Corning's fusion manufacturing process means that the glass can be as thin as 100 microns, which Corning says is about as thick as a sheet of printer paper. Beyond every day electronics, Willow Glass could also come in handy for flexible solar cells, and even lighting.

Without actually getting our hands on a piece of it, we're still a little bit skeptical as to whether or not something so thin could actually stand up to the rigors of everyday use, but who knows, we might all be using it before too long.

Via: Engadget

Source: Corning

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Well...it's all cute and everything. But...is it just as weatherproof to keep the heat and cold from getting inside..or out?

Microns????? That is not a real unit, that is american wreckage of the metric system. The real term is micrometers µm aka 1 millionth of a metre.

Iridium said,
Microns????? That is not a real unit, that is american wreckage of the metric system. The real term is micrometers µm aka 1 millionth of a metre.

But metric is so confusing... also, it's Greek, not 'Mercan.

It is so much simpler There are less base units. All the prefixes make pseudo units. People often dont understand that things like the kilogram or centimetre are not real units. Also you dont have to use the prefixes if you dont want. The other thing Americans and Australians dont understand is the beauty of the connection of the base units often in 1:1 ratios.

THolman said,

But metric is so confusing... also, it's Greek, not 'Mercan.

without using a calculator; how many inches are there in 12.45 feet. Because I know exactly how many centimeters there are in 12.45 meter

TRC said,
Is it actually glass or is it some type of plastic that they are calling glass for marketing hype?

They say it's real, authentic glass. Hard to believe, but that's what they say.

I'm sure it'll be nice for mobile devices, but I'm really imagining a large PC screen essentially flush with the wall.

Zagadka said,
I'm sure it'll be nice for mobile devices, but I'm really imagining a large PC screen essentially flush with the wall.

Agreed. I have been imagining the "wallpaper" being a large monitor that can display 4K or 8 K resolution of movies or even "views" (ala Sunrise Earth) 4 & 8k cameras are starting to come out and bandwidths are starting to rise (see Verizon FIOS 300k bandwidth)

James Rose said,

Agreed. I have been imagining the "wallpaper" being a large monitor that can display 4K or 8 K resolution of movies or even "views" (ala Sunrise Earth) 4 & 8k cameras are starting to come out and bandwidths are starting to rise (see Verizon FIOS 300k bandwidth)

lol, 300k bandwidth.

Enron said,

lol, 300k bandwidth.

Indeed. I've had 300k bandwidth since the mid-90's. (Since we seem to assume 300k is referring to 300 kB, or in more standard internet speed conventions, this would require roughly a 2.5 Mbit connection to get 300 kB.)

Wasn't Verizon proposing some 300 Mbps speed or something insane like that? or was it 30 or 300 Gbps?

rosszone said,

Indeed. I've had 300k bandwidth since the mid-90's. (Since we seem to assume 300k is referring to 300 kB, or in more standard internet speed conventions, this would require roughly a 2.5 Mbit connection to get 300 kB.)

Wasn't Verizon proposing some 300 Mbps speed or something insane like that? or was it 30 or 300 Gbps?

Well the good thing is, a 56k modem can simultaneously stream seven 8k high definition video feeds!

Enron said,

Well the good thing is, a 56k modem can simultaneously stream seven 8k high definition video feeds!


That's in perfect conditions. Most 56k modems were lucky to hit (50+)k on a good day lol. *yeah, I'm beating a dead horse a little more*

Enron said,

Well the good thing is, a 56k modem can simultaneously stream seven 8k high definition video feeds!

True, I wasn't even thinking 300k as kbit.... lol

Just waiting for the day I can unfold my watch into a phone... then into a tablet... then into a laptop... then into a TV.