Corporate Data Slips Out Via Google Calendar

Dial-in numbers and passcodes for company meetings are just one example of what is now available on Google thanks to the Search Google Calendar feature, added to Google's Web-based calendar service last November. Launched last year as part of Google's effort to develop a series of Web-based productivity applications, Google Calendar gives users the choice of keeping calendar entries private or publishing them for the world to see, but some Google Calendar users appear to be sharing their calendar information without realizing it. Quite a few corporate calendars can be found on Google Calendar yielding such tidbits as the date and time of vendor meetings and names of projects in the works.

News source: PC World

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This is exactly why you NEVER use a third party online application for confidential or personal information! You always store stuff locally on your own network, or locally and use local applications!... A public application can have just to many chances at being compromised... at least when you control it, you have responsability for it.

When you get someone else to run it, you can blame them. Many companies use "hosted" applications like Google's.

Even if it is a small bussiness, it not recommended to host there data (Even if it is free) to a public domain or the server maintained or shared publicly...

Putting corporate information into the servers of the company that specializes in searching might not be the best way to protect the mentioned corporate information...Tats true...

And only idiots put those corporate information into other company servers!

Hello - newsflash!

Putting corporate information into the servers of the company that specializes in searching might not be the best way to protect the mentioned corporate information! :nuts:

This is the funniest thing I have read today. What sort of corporate idots use Google (thw world's biggest dataminer) to store their company's info?

Express said,
This is the funniest thing I have read today. What sort of corporate idots use Google (thw world's biggest dataminer) to store their company's info?

Even if it was a mistake in how they setup google calander, I still don't like the idea of my apps being server side. Forget the problems you will have if your internet goes out and you can't even get to your data, but storing the info, private or not, on some server means that it could get hacked at some point. All your data could be lost also, what happens if one of these google servers goes poof? How will I get my data back? I suppose you could say they will have backups, but how old?

Anyways. online stuff like this, I just don't like it. I want apps on my PC as well as my data here also, thank you.

How stupid would you have to be to be sharing a calendar without knowing? They're all private by default, so if they're shared someone made them that way.

You should click the link to the news source, The summary in here seems to be sentences put together from diffrent paragraphs. But it seems that the companies' employees are sharing their calendars in Google Calendar with sensitive information that can be found by using "Search Google Calendar".

Not your fault, just not a very good summary to cut and paste sentences like that.

That doesn't change that you can keep your data private (by default), or share with others (still private but share with particular users explicitly), or make public.

The search feature isn't exposing private or privately shared data. These people are just dumb.

How exactly are they supposed to put advertising in the software if it's offline? They don't offer these services to be nice, they're advertising platforms.

Jeremy1 said,
How exactly are they supposed to put advertising in the software if it's offline? They don't offer these services to be nice, they're advertising platforms.

Well DUH! They charge money for their software and undercut Microsoft by a large number. It would sell.

Jeremy1 said,
How exactly are they supposed to put advertising in the software if it's offline? They don't offer these services to be nice, they're advertising platforms.

The same way that Opera did (and a whole lot of other publishers do like MSN with MSN/Windows Live Messenger), stick ad panes in the software.