Court Extends Microsoft Oversight

Court oversight of Microsoft Corp.'s market power, which began in 2002 after a landmark antitrust settlement, has been extended by 18 months after a ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly today. The decision was influenced by delays by Microsoft in filing technical documents related to the licensing of its software, although the judge said the court's ruling "should not be viewed as a sanction against Microsoft." The settlement will remain in effect until November 2009, though a group of ten states, led by California and New York, had requested the oversight be extended until November 2012.

In response, Brad Smith, Microsoft's general counsel, stated: "We will continue to comply fully with the consent decree. We are gratified that the court recognized our extensive efforts to work cooperatively with the large number of government agencies involved."

News source: AP

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8 Comments

So here we have the US criticising Microsoft for anti-competitive behaviour (which is what monitoring is) but when the EU does it it's because they're after money or because they hate US businesses? I think people have to realise that for as much good as Microsoft has done they are far from being a squeaky clean business.

Uh, what? We say the EU is after money because the EU sues MS for ridiculous amounts of money.

I think people like you have to realize that MS is more squeaky clean than you give them credit for (though I'm not saying they are without fault on quite a few things).

-Spenser

Of course you must be right. It can't possibly be the case that the hundreds/thousands of people investigating on behalf of / as part of the EU could be right (you know, the ones that have actually looked into Microsoft's business dealings and have access to a huge amount more data than we do)! No, your post has won me around and convinced me that the EU is completely flawed and corrupt. Thanks for showing me the light. Perhaps you have an opinion on global warming too?

(theyarecomingforyou said @ #1.2)
Of course you must be right. It can't possibly be the case that the hundreds/thousands of people investigating on behalf of / as part of the EU could be right (you know, the ones that have actually looked into Microsoft's business dealings and have access to a huge amount more data than we do)! No, your post has won me around and convinced me that the EU is completely flawed and corrupt. Thanks for showing me the light. Perhaps you have an opinion on global warming too?

Monitoring Microsoft's practices in regards to OEM contracts and such is quite different from fining Microsoft outrageous amounts of money for including basic functionality with the OS (that every competing OS has included for years if not decades). The same goes for having a government body regulate the feature sets of products and requiring the existance of product versions that nobody wants to buy.

Quite different indeed.

(theyarecomingforyou said @ #1)
...but when the EU does it it's because they're after money or because they hate US businesses?

Who said that the EU hates US businesses? The EU loves US businesses, and it loves the money that it can extract from those businesses through its legal extortion schemes. That's why the EU is never going to stop using this strategy against Microsoft and any other businesses that it believes can afford to pay.

As for Microsoft, no matter what it does to please the EU; no matter how far backwards it bends over; no matter how much money it gives up, it'll never be enough. As long as Microsoft continues to pay, the EU will continue to demand more.

And for that, I don't say, "Shame on you, EU!" I say, "Shame on you, Microsoft!!" Shame on you for aiding and abetting this ongoing criminal enterprise and allowing it to flourish by treating it as the price of doing business in Europe.

I still say if a company is doing well why should they be penalised for it, sure competition makes the world go round and drives cash flow, but why do it if one company has the technology the money and the business know how to succeed where many have failed. Sure Microsoft are A massive company always will be, but you don't see other large corporations being screwed over for antitrust.

Seem like most governments and governing bodies are out to milk the cash cow, they also have it out for the large company's anyway (as long as they have the word micro and soft in them).

Enigma...I think the issue here isn't necessarily the fact that MS are "so big" it's more to do with the fact that MS, as global market leader, should have an obligation to pull the rest of the world along with it. If MS were allowed to get TOO big through technology jumps or over bundled OS's there would be no "market" anymore as they would be a sole trader in it. Whilst I don't agree with the reasons for the fines (always) MS constantly get handed out, I agree with it's effect, which basically gives other's a fighting chance and keeps economy moving.

2009 is fair. the 2012 deadline the states wanted is just crazy, cause then they'll just want 5 more years after that. I think the success of google, apple, and other companies shows that MS is not currently abusing their windows monolopy and even if they tried to, I doubt they would be anywhere near as successful as they were then.

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