Cracking Open the Apple MacBook Air

The Apple MacBook Air is thin, light, and a testament to what good engineering and design can accomplish in a notebook personal computer. This latest TechRepublic Cracking Open Photo Gallery explores the technology of this ultra thin notebook.

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It's thin great... but say it is only the quarter the thickness of other laptops, say other laptops are about 3-4 cm thick max. So you gain and extra 2 cm in oyur bag (1 book/ 2 or 3 folders)... surely it would be cheaper to just buy a bigger bag?

I'd say that having a non user-serviceable battery on a notebook computer is FAR from good engineering or design.

Yeah, cause when my battery goes out after about the year it takes them to not charge fully anymore these days, I'd LOVE to pay Apple like 300 bucks to replace it. Their design team can go fist themselves.

Didn't Apple say that they will replace the battery for you for about $100-120. I can't remember the price, but I'm pretty sure that included part and labor. I agree that it's nice to be able to pop in a spare battery, but does the average consumer really do that?

Yeah, I can't imagine how useless a computer would be without a floppy drive or a modem port, either... sheesh, the nerve of these people.

In all seriousness, optical media probably isn't going anywhere any time soon. If you're looking at the Macbook Air and saying "but it's lacking this and that, who could ever use it?" then you're probably thinking of trying to make it a primary computer - which it clearly was not designed for. As of OS X 10.5.2 there's a little utility for installing OS X to a Macbook Air and an addition to the OS for sharing your optical drive with another computer - there's the big hint that the Macbook Air is made to fill niche roles rather than to be the primary system on its own.

I'm not sure how to break this to you but my gaming rig doesn't have an optical drive either. It saves cable space, everything I want is either streamed through the slingbox or synced to my iPhone. In addition I have the ISOs of all my programs and games are on my hard drives and Alcohol 120% makes short work of that. The same can be said for my macbook pro, as office 2008, cs3, toast, etc are all stored as dmgs on my 2nd partition, not to mention my external usb drive. I can't remember the last time I needed to burn something.

I agree with Ledgem this is clearly not intended as a main computer for people who aren't up to date on their technology. That is unless you can tell me that you actually shelled out 400$ on a Blu-Ray burner.

A product that is ahead of its time, pushing us a little bit faster into the future.

I get everything online. I burn backups to DVD, that's it. That's what your desktop is for at home. Carrying around CDs and DVDs "on the go" is ridiculous.

(LTD said @ #3.3)
A product that is ahead of its time, pushing us a little bit faster into the future.

I get everything online. I burn backups to DVD, that's it. That's what your desktop is for at home. Carrying around CDs and DVDs "on the go" is ridiculous.

So what' you're saying is, "You must have TWO computers to do what you actually NEED to do." OK, got it. Right from a mac user's mouth.

(LTD said @ #3.3)
A product that is ahead of its time, pushing us a little bit faster into the future.

I get everything online. I burn backups to DVD, that's it. That's what your desktop is for at home. Carrying around CDs and DVDs "on the go" is ridiculous.


Don't know about MBA being ahead of its time, but it's pretty logical that Apple removed a ****load of circuitry (e.g. optical drive controller, have only 1 usb port, ethernet port) to make the MBA smaller. Nothing about the MBA is ahead of its time.

Edit: Although I might have mis-interpret your point, if the future is all wireless I'd worry a lot about data-interruptions and unpredictable interferences.

(Ledgem said @ #3.1)
Yeah, I can't imagine how useless a computer would be without a floppy drive or a modem port, either... sheesh, the nerve of these people.

Last time I looked, software media is still the CD/DVD. Not the floppy or modem. Find a better argument. How the hell can you install anything you can't download onto it?