Cram 4TB on Desktop Drives by 2009, Hitachi Says

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies plans to announce Monday it has developed technology that will quadruple the storage capacity of desktop hard drives within the next two years. The new reading-head technology will allow the company to cram more data on hard drives. Desktop computers could attain a capacity of 4TB of storage while laptop storage could reach 1TB, according to Hitachi.

Hard drives are currently doubling in capacity every two years, said John Best, chief technologist at Hitachi Global Storage Technologies. The new reading-head technology will allow an even greater capacity boost while shrinking the size of disk drives, Best said.

View: The full story
News source: PCWorld

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Mobile quad-core up and running

Next Story

EU will not look at Google privacy issues

31 Comments

View more comments

Fubar said,
i didn't say it wasn't researched , and i wasn't talking about flash maybe its just me thinking out side of the box

What's wrong with Flash or SSDs? If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

shroom said,
Heh, I've seen flash drives fail just as often as hard drives...

O RLY?
I have had several hard drives fail, but only 1 of 5 flash drives, all different brands and sizes.

Solid State storage is still way too expensive though, although I agree we should be moving away from mechanical parts .

Let's not forget that this is only Hitachi saying that at the moment. And anyway, with the introduction of HD-DVD and Bluray, people are going to need much bigger disks, for games and movies. And other companies are working on new technology - Samsung has released numerous Solid State Drives that can cut boot times in half (though very expensive - £400/$800 for 60Gb). However, I doubt that we will have both performance AND capacity drives by 2009 - and any 4TB SSD Hard Drive will undoubtedly cost a hell of a lot. That's my 2 cents anyway.

Am I the only one who thinks the speed of HDs need to be increased more so than the space? I find it insane that a HD in 2007 performs (in direct platter to bus transfers speeds not cache (burst) speeds) roughly the same as a drive from 1999... I'd be happy if we stayed at 1TB if the transfer speeds topped 150MB/s or something... being in the 60MB/s-70MB/s range is just disgusting...

Increasing HD speeds would make computers immensely faster since the HD is the sole weakest link... Maybe this new head technology will help in that area? Since the higher the density the more the head can "grab" at once, but there was no mention of it so it is just idle speculation on my part. Ether way, I vote for faster disks more so than more spacious disks...

What ****es me off with these HD (and CPU) manufacturers is that they develop new technologies to double/triple/quadruple the size or speed of their products and then roll them out incrementally over several years, taking us on a never-ending 'upgrade' path.

If they have the technology to build 4TB drives then why don't they release them TOMORROW???

Gives them the chance to recoup the costs assosiated with developing the technology and it keeps the cost of technology down. If you're not an "early adopter" then the costs to upgrade stays rather constant with constant technology advances.

So, basically, the do it to keep costs down and to recoup R&D costs... This isn't unique to technology companies... It is done in almost every industry that produces products that gets improvements. Cars is an example that comes to mind. They make an advancement in car technology and release a new car on that technology and then they refresh the model with minor updates each year until the next major advancement.

Frazell Thomas said,
Cars is an example that comes to mind. They make an advancement in car technology and release a new car on that technology and then they refresh the model with minor updates each year until the next major advancement.

Wouldn't call cars a good example. They are a very mature (one could argue outdated) technology with very few 'major' advancements. The upgrade path is basically done on looks (this years model makes last years model look old) and incremental size increase (this years model has 1 cm more leg room etc).

Surely if Hitachi offered a 4TB HD tomorrow at the same price as the oppositions' 500GB drives then they would corner the market and recoup their 'development costs' back rather quickly.

I blame Industry collusion...

hentaiboy said,

Wouldn't call cars a good example. They are a very mature (one could argue outdated) technology with very few 'major' advancements. The upgrade path is basically done on looks (this years model makes last years model look old) and incremental size increase (this years model has 1 cm more leg room etc).

Surely if Hitachi offered a 4TB HD tomorrow at the same price as the oppositions' 500GB drives then they would corner the market and recoup their 'development costs' back rather quickly.

I blame Industry collusion...

There are advancements in car technology with each new model (not the yearly increments, I mean actual models). You can argue that those advancements are not significant or that they are, but they are considered advacements by the companies investing billions in them and the consumers looking at spending billions to acquire it.

The same is usable in technology... Do we NEED 4TB HDs today? Probably not... And, as I argued above, since the speeds of HDs are pretty much stagnant does is it really any different than an "incremental size increase" (to quote you)?

The fact is there are people who see the additions to the car as beneficial just as there are people who see 4TB as beneficial. There is a cost to developing that technology and those costs have to be recouped...

Also, Hitachi would not benefit by dumping 4TB HDs today at the price of a 500GB HD. They would only hurt themselves (as they wouldn't be able to produce enough of them to meet world demand as they would essentially be making the only HD in demand) by being unable to deliver their orders on time. The market would also bounce the price back into check. Since the HD would be in super high demand and the supply would be so low retailers would adjust the price accordingly to reduce demand. So the retailer would get super high markups at the expense of Hitachi who needs to recover R&D costs on the technology...

It is a nice dream that they could just drop it all out at once, but the reality is much different. The HD business is extremely competitive so these companies drop out their best as soon as they can to get some kind of competitive edge over the next company.

My dream of caching the entire web's porn content on my local drive can someday soon be true!!! Seriously, I don't even know wtf to do with 1TB at the moment :eek:

Commenting is disabled on this article.