Crytek to combat Epic Games' Unreal Engine 4 by offering CryEngine for $9.90 a month

Let the battle of the high end game engines begin! Earlier today, Epic Games announced that it was offering the full version of Unreal Engine 4 immediately to anyone for the price of $19 a month, plus 5 percent of any revenues generated by commercial products that use the engine. 

Now rival Crytek, makers of the CryEngine tools, have just announced a similar plan that will give developers access to the full engine for the price of just $9.90 a month. The plan will also be "royalty free', according to the company.

Crytek says their plan, which they are calling the "CryEngine-as-a-Service" program, will officially launch sometime in May. Details about the offer are still scarce but the company claims that it will offer indie game developers access to all of the engine's new features such as Physically Based Shading, Geometry Cache and Image Based Lighting. Crytek will continue to provide its free CryEngine SDK but today's press release suggests it will no longer be updated with the engine's current features.

Crytek has used the previous versions of its CryEngine to develop games like the first Far Cry title, along with the Crysis series of sci-fi first person shooters. Crytek's last title was Ryse: Son of Rome, a third person action game that was an exclusive for Microsoft's Xbox One title. Upcoming third party games that will use CryEngine include the sci-fi shooter Evolve from Turtle Rock Studios and the space combat sim Star Citizen, developed bv a team led by Wing Commander creator Chris Roberts.

In related news, AMD announced today that Crytek will incorporate support for their low-level Mantle API in a future update for CryEngine.

Source: Crytek | Image via Crytek

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Facebook's security director joins Bitcoin exchange Coinbase

Next Story

Basketball Fans Rejoice: NCAA App Released for Windows

24 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

Nice. As much as I like UE3 and UE4, I've always liked CryEngine more. As good as UE4 looks, I think CryEngine has a slight edge in visual quality. It just looks better to me. I think UE4 has the better development tools though. They've designed it so that artists can make a game without any help from programmers.

trojan_market said,
golden days to be a developer.


It's only going to get better for devs in general as the world and everything we use for life and entertainment moves even further into tech/software.

Just saw some videos about UE4, it's giving CryEngine 3 and Frostbite 2 a run for their money though I think Crytek will still be ahead as far as who can give you the better visuals.

Exciting news!
Am using the CryEngine 3 for a small hobby project and having a license for as little as $10, makes it affordable for me to upgrade to CryEngine 4 even though I will probably never make money on my hobby project :)

Now we need Ubisoft to make an announcement for that shiny new Snowdrop engine. Now that looks impressive, more of what we need for the new gen. New engines.

It probably depends on the game you want to design, but both engines have great games and work on many platforms. Even if they're both just as easy to use and flexible, it means more competition.

To be fair this costs MORE than it used to. You used to buy an Unreal game or whatever, for $40 bucks or $50. And inside was the engine and editor, in which mods and total transformations could be made. Although each person may or may not have needed a license for the game engine themselves to join in and play.

So cheaper only because now you might make your game available for free and now nobody else has to pay. Nice..

nullie said,
To be fair this costs MORE than it used to. You used to buy an Unreal game or whatever, for $40 bucks or $50. And inside was the engine and editor, in which mods and total transformations could be made.
Made all right, but sold commercially as well? I'm sure the license wouldn't allow you to do so for a mere $40 or $50 a game.

lol

yeah games still are released with an editor. for that game. and you can't make an entirely new game using that (or you can, but the work for the assets, scripts and the limitedness intrinsically associated with the game makes it not only very difficult but very expensive to develop, making unrealistic to do such), not to mention the obvious fact: you can't even sell that game because you didn't own the license of anything in the first place.

This and Epic's Unreal changes the paradigm developers had to work with; before they had to make or license some graphics engine, with very limited scripting and limited level editors (or not at all); now they have access to a top game engine, that uses top of shelf technology, including easy to use scripting and level editors with an incredible cheap price (c'mon, 19$ or 10$ per month? are you saying that price is a restrigement for indie / solo developers? did you know how much it costs to develop a game, even a very basic and simple one, without proper tools? and if one can't afford 19$ per month for using top of the shelf software then they have bigger issues to deal in the first place), giving them the liberty to do whatever they wanted, with very good graphics, tools and sell it for profits; isn't that a great deal?

nullie said,
To be fair this costs MORE than it used to. You used to buy an Unreal game or whatever, for $40 bucks or $50. And inside was the engine and editor, in which mods and total transformations could be made. Although each person may or may not have needed a license for the game engine themselves to join in and play.

So cheaper only because now you might make your game available for free and now nobody else has to pay. Nice..

Pretty sure this never entitled you to redistribute the games you made.

Oh yeah, people redistributed the games they made. Look at sites full of mods and whatever downloads. Like file planet, etc. The game can be redistributed but the user usually runs it inside their own copy of the engine. Counter Strike used to be such a game. So was Team Fortress. All you needed was one license to any other half life engine based game to play it and you could install and play these games for free on the side.

i know the mod community, as i used to make mods with the Half Life engine :D (not for sharing, as i used as a base to make 3D plants from 2D to show people how it could look). Also you can't sell those mods, it's illegal.
Also mods like CS, TF and the likes weren't for sale until Valve bought the rights; making a mod of a game doesn't give you the right to sell that same mod, you know? also like a said, if i wanna make a completely different game or an commercial application then mods just won't cut it.

I am sure you can sell the mod itself, just not any of the textures, music, scripts, or engine from the dependent game/engine without licensing it...

On top of that a company although I don't think it's binding might try to say they own the copyright to any content you make and then try to bar you from distributing it, but that might be a hard sell to any judge without you signing an actual contract with your actual signature and all..

Well, Crytek has shown that games can look good. Hopefully, others will show that games on the engine can also be good too. :p

I cannot do any comparison between the newest versions, but for a hobby project, I had a look at the free versions of both CryEngine 3 and UDK and I must say I prefer CryEngines tools. For me, they are easier to start up on.