Cuba to migrate to Open-Source Software

Several Cuban government ministers backed the move to open-source software, and away from U.S.-based Microsoft, at a technology conference held late last week. Communications minister Ramiro Valdes gave an opening keynote that advocated open source, while head of the Free Software Foundation Richard Stallman, told the conference that proprietary software is inherently insecure. Cuba's customs service has already migrated to Linux, while the ministries of culture, higher education and communications are planning to do so. Cuban academic, Hector Rodriguez, declined to say how long it would take for the Cuban government to migrate most of its systems to Linux. "It would be tough for me to say that we would migrate half the public administration in three years," he told the conference. The number of Cuban open-source users is growing fast, with around 3,000 in a communist country that struggles with outdated PCs and slow Internet links.

News source: News.com

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23 Comments

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Not flaming open source software, but certain anti-OSS advocates will only laugh at the stereotype posed by using OSS as supporting communism.

But on topic:

while head of the Free Software Foundation Richard Stallman, told the conference that proprietary software is inherently insecure.

the heck is with that loudmouth Stallman and FSF's silly BadVista campaign.

Has he actually given a reason why he believes this statement to be true, or is he just trying to emote the audience with fictional statements?

wait...being that Cuba is communist, isn't Microsoft prohibited from doing business with them?

so how did they go about getting the microsoft software legally?

Pox said,
Umm... is that a joke? China's communist... where do you think all the crappy plastic toys come from?

ok, true... but we do have a trade embargo against Cuba i though

Aleck79 said,
wait...being that Cuba is communist...so how did they go about getting the microsoft software legally?

I don't know, but I'll be happy to send them one Microsoft (or any other) OS for each box of Montecristo No. 2 Especials that they send me!

Agreed. A corrected statement would be "Richard Stallman, told the conference that proprietary software is inherently insecure.", as all software is insecure and has flaws.

A more diplomatic approach: The 'concept' of proprietary software helps foster an environment of insecurity. No one has ever accused RMS of being diplomatic.

I think it's the government agencies that actually benefit from these open source projects the most, one it's free, two they could customise it to their liking without much effort, three they're not locked to a proprietary format, four it's more secure (than windows, anyways).

And I would like to highlight this:

Other governments, including Venezuela, China, Brazil and Norway, are evaluating a partial or total migration from Windows to open source. Many city administrations are also running projects. In Europe, programmes in Bristol, Amsterdam and Munich are well underway.

And I am still remember something about the France, I think their are migrating too... There was one article about ministers and open source few months ago maybe...

Microsoft will be loosing it's market share.

david13lt said,
Microsoft will be loosing it's market share.
Oh, it will be a long time before this will happen in any significant measurable fashion.

This is all nickel and dime stuff, really.

markjensen said,
Oh, it will be a long time before this will happen in any significant measurable fashion.

This is all nickel and dime stuff, really.

Probably true, but it gives Linux some "poster children" to point at, which is always a good thing.