Feature phones featureless? Smartphones to take mobile lead by 2011

According to Nielsen, by the end of 2011 there will be more smartphones in operation than feature phones. Smartphones currently control a full quarter of the mobile market; accessing email, web, social and voice on the go will only become more prevalent as the market continues to grow at an alarming pace. Combine this with the current mobiles in use and the unprecedented growth over the last 5 years, Nielsen's predictions may very well hold true.

With a 2% growth since the last quarter and 64% growth over last year, the smartphone shows no signs of tapering off. Android alone has grown more than 886% in the last year and while 90% of iPhone users remain loyal to their brand, all other facets continue to grow.

This dynamic shift is HUGE for the market. From POTS to mobile to smart, Alexander Graham Bell would be proud. Sparking an industry that to this day supports millions of jobs and has connected the masses, Alexander would be proud to see his work shift from the wall, to the desk and finally into the pocket of the proletariat.

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Not surprised about that statistic, or the fact that Android overtook the iPhone. After all, there are several different Android phones by different manufacturers, whereas Apple only has the 8 GB 3G(S) and the 16/32 GB iPhone 4.

As for me, haven't used a landline since 2005.

I haven't had a landline since I got my first cell phone in 2005 (yes, I was behind everyone else and didn't get one till after college....now there are 13yo with cellphones...).

Now I have a smartphone (iPhone 4) and w/ tax and fees my monthly bill is right at $70/mo. I'm pretty satisfied with it.

My dad kept his landline for years after getting a cellphone. He said he needed it for Internet. It was ridiculous, he was still using dial-up and didn't see the need to upgrade to broadband. He was paying $20/mo for dialup internet and then $35/mo for a landline w/ long distance costing $0.05/min. Old people..../sigh

This report is in gross error! The Neilsen article says the smartphone will overtake feature phones which are mobile phones! There are still more landline phones in the US than there are people! I think journalism has sunk to the bottom of the ocean of intelligence!

ChicagK said,
This report is in gross error! The Neilsen article says the smartphone will overtake feature phones which are mobile phones! There are still more landline phones in the US than there are people! I think journalism has sunk to the bottom of the ocean of intelligence!

Good point, I hadn't even looked at the Neilson article till you said that.

All you need is your Broadband and a Skype Online Number (http://www.skype.com/intl/en/f...s/allfeatures/online-number) and if you feel compelled to, get yourself a Skype Phone to give yourself a 'disconnect' from the computer (so it doesn't need to be on all the time).

Forget Line Rental at €25.36 a month (Eircom in Ireland) and just get this (if you're lucky enough to be able to avail of Wireless Broadband to the home which, fortunately, I have in Cork AND Kerry).

Skype is a much cheaper alternative to what's out there - why bother with ageing technology when the same concept is available over the internet.

A couple of problems with that.

1 - Signal coverage. Some people still cannot get a reliable 2G signal, let alone 3G or HSDPA.
2 - Emergencies. At least in my experience, landline networks are more resilient.
3 - Broadband. At least in the UK, unless you go for Virgin Media, you have to have a normal telephone line (and pay £10 a month for it) in order for you to have broadband, as nearly everyone uses ADSL.

A landline is good for one thing....emergencies. Old-school landlines are powered by the phone lines themselves so if regular power is down and cell phone towers are down (which is likely in such an event), it's good to have a landline.

lordcanti86 said,
A landline is good for one thing....emergencies. Old-school landlines are powered by the phone lines themselves so if regular power is down and cell phone towers are down (which is likely in such an event), it's good to have a landline.

And it is in those areas where landlines hang on; in particular areas known for disasters that play hob with anything other than landlines (such as weather-related disasters). However, the western US (specifically California) has to worry about wildfires (both natural and arson-caused) and the dreaded earthquake - both of these also threaten landlines in addition to cellular and mobile-radio (first-responder) services. It is for that reason why California has the highest percentage (of any state) of cellular-only households; the utter lack of a real safety net. (Although, with tremors now starting to happen in the eastern half of North America - the last two tremors of any size to hit North America were *both* felt in Washington, DC - the smugness of the mild mild East is proving to be decidedly misplaced.)

lordcanti86 said,
A landline is good for one thing....emergencies. Old-school landlines are powered by the phone lines themselves so if regular power is down and cell phone towers are down (which is likely in such an event), it's good to have a landline.

And in those cases, it's just as likely that the phone lines will be down as well, since they tend to run on the same poles that the power lines run on. At least here in the southeast, when a hurricane or other severe weather comes through, the power and phone lines are usually the first things to go. The cell towers usually have backup generators and buried wires going to them, meaning that they FAR outlast the regular phone lines in an emergency.

I think single people with no kids can live without a landline......but when you have kids you need the landline to give to the school and in case there's a emergency or issue with the mobile provider etc ie kids .

Having said that...we got rid of our standard landline 3mths ago and converted over to VoIP
Now we have unlimmted Local and National Calls from the home phone and our mobiles as backups in case the cable internet is down...rarely ever goes offline tho

I got rid of my landline in 2007 for Vonage and in 2009 I transferred my number to a cellphone (Android ....now I have an iPhone ) and I sure don't miss the landline....

I got rid of my landline in 2007 for Vonage and in 2009 I transferred my number to a cellphone (Android ....now I have an iPhone ) and I sure don't miss the landline....

Ma Bell (AT&T) was broken up in 1984. As far as the article, it's no surprise landlines are going away. For us, almost 3 years with cells only.

Will we finally see the two blend to become one? It would be nice to see a home phone that can sync with your mobile or just be able to use the same number for both, something like that.

dogmai said,
Will we finally see the two blend to become one? It would be nice to see a home phone that can sync with your mobile or just be able to use the same number for both, something like that.

It's called Google Voice.

But, I don't have a home phone and haven't for over 5 years... and I get free calls to any mobile phone... and nights and weekends at 7pm... so I really have no need for GV.

dogmai said,
Will we finally see the two blend to become one? It would be nice to see a home phone that can sync with your mobile or just be able to use the same number for both, something like that.

Kind of what you are talking about, they have had this for a few years now. They are "normal" cordless phones you can use in your house, but they use bluetooth to connect to your cell and use that instead of a physical landline. I think they also have landline hookup (or some do at least). For example, http://www.amazon.com/Panasoni...stem-Handsets/dp/B00138AJPO .

Do they have the opposite of that. It would be nice if the phones can go both ways. Link your cell to your cordless with bluetooth and link your homephone to your cell. I'd like to be able to use both my cell to make calls using my phone phone and my cordless phones to use my cell service with bluetooth.

vaximily said,

It's called Google Voice.

But, I don't have a home phone and haven't for over 5 years... and I get free calls to any mobile phone... and nights and weekends at 7pm... so I really have no need for GV.

I'll look into that. Hopefully it's similar to what I'm looking for.

vaximily said,

It's called Google Voice.

But, I don't have a home phone and haven't for over 5 years... and I get free calls to any mobile phone... and nights and weekends at 7pm... so I really have no need for GV.

Looks cool but I'm in Canada. It's another US only service.

At first I thought this was cell phones vs POTS... I was like "didn't that happen a few years ago?". Smart phones though, that's a big accomplishment! =)

vaximily said,
At first I thought this was cell phones vs POTS... I was like "didn't that happen a few years ago?". Smart phones though, that's a big accomplishment! =)
But without landlines service how would anyone will connect to the Internet with DSL modem?

Quattrone said,
But without landlines service how would anyone will connect to the Internet with DSL modem?

DSL service does not necessarily require wired PHONE service, even though it uses the same lines.

roadwarrior said,

DSL service does not necessarily require wired PHONE service, even though it uses the same lines.

In the UK, any many other countries it does

WelshBluebird said,

In the UK, any many other countries it does

In Canada we have what's called a dry-loop. They install a line card at your location that carries only data and has voice disabled. There is still technically a phone number attached to the line but they don't charge you for it because you're not using it. They used to charge $10 extra per month but at least with Bell and other ISP's offering DSL in my area, they don't anymore.

Scutley said,

Does it really matter anymore?

It does where I live. Cable speeds START at 6Mbps, which is where DSL tops out. And cable is available in a lot of places where DSL simply isn't, or where DSL is limited to even lower speeds due to being so far from the CO.

roadwarrior said,

It does where I live. Cable speeds START at 6Mbps, which is where DSL tops out. And cable is available in a lot of places where DSL simply isn't, or where DSL is limited to even lower speeds due to being so far from the CO.

Qwest is offering a 20mbps fiber link. Not sure if it is "DSL" technology or not. But I like Comcast's 16mbps connection more (which is more like 20+ mbps most of the time).

The land-line phone companies (and cable companies) got hit hard by government regulation some years ago (during some anti-trust stuff). The result is that they can't force consumers to buy bundles (i.e., you don't have to have a phone service or cable TV service with your internet) and it also means that they can't lock people into 2-year contracts.

Its funny, Qwest still offers their DSL service for a year at a discounted rate and say that after that the rate goes up. Well f-you qwest, i'll just switch providers when you up my rates.

Quattrone said,
But without landlines service how would anyone will connect to the Internet with DSL modem?

It's called 'Naked Dsl' Its dsl without the phone service

Shadrack said,

Qwest is offering a 20mbps fiber link. Not sure if it is "DSL" technology or not.

Fiber refers to Fiber Optics. A completely different infrastructure than DSL or cable. So it's not "DSL technology".