D-Link's Gig wireless box forgets the 'and'

D-Link's announced a Gigabit wireless router - but don't get too excited, as it's not some ten-fold breakthrough in radio bandwidth. Sadly, the Gigabit bit is only on the wired side, with the box having a four-port Gig switch built in.

What it does show is how fast Gigabit Ethernet is reaching the desktop - in smaller businesses and homes, at least, where new PCs now come with it as standard. The DI-724GU Gigabit office router includes all the other features we've come to expect from a wireless router, including 54Mbit/s 802.11g Wi-Fi, a firewall, Web filtering to block access to inappropriate URLs, and a USB print server.

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News source: The Reg

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12 Comments

Isn't it a tad pointless to have gigabit ethernet on a router but only give it wireless-G support? May as well give it wireless-N too.

My D-Link DGL-4300 has a gigbit ethernet switch built into it and QoS features. It has also been available for two years. This looks like a rehash of that into a different chassis and probably a modified OS.

Quote - KXH said @ #3
My D-Link DGL-4300 has a gigbit ethernet switch built into it and QoS features. It has also been available for two years. This looks like a rehash of that into a different chassis and probably a modified OS.

I was going to say the exact same thing. Looks like you beat me to it. :P

Quote - voidunknown said @ #3.1

I was going to say the exact same thing. Looks like you beat me to it. :P

.Yup same here. I was going to say D-Link already has one. Granted it was labeled as a gaming router, I guess they can get the hype back up by offering it again(as something else) to people who don't already know.

D-Link has had a Gigibit gaming router for two years. Its the DGL-4300 and I personally own one. I just use the gigibit portion and do not use the wireless. If you want a gigibit router and wireless at 270mb N draft then go with the Linksys WRT350N or Linksys WRVS4400N. Gigibit is reaching the desktop quote should be removed. It;s been to the desktop for years, unless you been living in a cave.

I believe the title is implying that he actually thought that "Gigabit wireless router" meant it was some radical new Gbps wireless standard supporting router.. or something.

Quality news.

EDIT: Nevermind. I don't think it makes sense at all. Attempt at witty title status: failure.

We've been needing gigabit on desktops for a while now - I find in my home network (5 100MB pc's with a 100MB switch), the network is painfully slow for copying large files between PC's. I suspect thats because of inefficiencies in the SMB protocol, because the network should be 100Mbit (10Mbyte/s with protocol overheads), however file copies only work at around 5 Mbytes/s, even though neither the disk or CPU on either PC seems to be the limiting factor.

That means it takes 20 mins to half an hour to copy a single DL dvd, and copying disk images around takes an age.


Speaking of which, if microsoft want another feature request for windows, add a virtual jobs queue, such that file copies can be put on the queue, and then actually occur hours later, or maybe even weeks later when more resources are free. For example large file copies could appear to have occured (the file appears in the destination and disappears from the source), but only actually copy when the destination file is read for the first time (a bit like memory mapped files, but over a network), or when disk space is short on the system. It would act like a massive cache, like you can write a file to a hard disk, but the write doesn't occur till the cache is flushed.

Obviously, you'd then need a safely disconnect option, to force all the jobs to be completed for a network device or host before it could be disconnected from the network. (rather like the safe disconnect option for flash drives to flush the disk cache)

You mean Netgear messed up part of their product description? Should I be surprised? It's like when we bought their GSM7224 switches thinking they do VLAN-trunking, then finding out that they don't according to Netgear support, but then figuring out how to do it anyway.

Meet your management needs with SNMP, RMON, DHCP, and BootP. Advanced features include up to 224 VLANs, DiffServ traffic prioritization 802.1p (QoS) for Voice over IP services (VOIP), broadcast storm protection, RADIUS, 802.1x, port trunking, rapid spanning tree, and link aggregation.

See those two terms in bold? It turns out port trunking is Netgear's terminology for link aggregation. If any Cisco-certified technician sees both those terms being distinguished from one another in the same sentence, the only conclusion to come to is that they mean VLAN-trunking. But no, they mean link aggregation. So, it's like saying, "This computer does math AND arithmetic." Thanks, Netgear.

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