Danish scientists achieve mind-blowing internet speeds using the tech of today

Remember that time when your movie buffered every five seconds and you couldn’t watch anything? Well that might be a thing of the past if Danish scientists have their way.

A team of researchers from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) have created a record-breaking internet connection, which is able to transfer up to five terabytes of data every second - 43 Tbps to be more precise. That’s a remarkable achievement and may prove a huge step towards a world of hyper-broadband internet connections.

While the speed itself will have many of you salivating, what’s actually revolutionary about this tech is that those transfer rates were achieved using only a single, albeit special, fiber optic cable, and one laser transmitter- exactly what commercial internet is based on. Currently commercial solutions stop at a 100 Gbps ceiling, but upgrading with this new technology means connections around the world could handle a lot more traffic.

Obviously this technology won’t make it directly into your home just yet. Having a 43 Tbps connection would be useless to most users. Even 1 Gbps connections, which are becoming more widespread, often hit much lower transfer limits thanks to the hardware involved.

The new connections could be implemented by ISPs to help handle faster speeds, more connections and more data. This in turn would ensure better quality for everyone and consistent reliable connections.

Source: DTU via: The Independent | Optical fibre image by Shutterstock

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

You can now head into a Microsoft store and buy a Surface Pro 3 with an i3 or i7

Next Story

'Google Barge' gets killed off, company scraps its floating showroom

27 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

" Obviously this technology won't make it directly into your home just yet. Having a 43 Tbps connection would be useless to most users. "

STFU.

Now if only any of these internet breakthroughs made in the last 5 years actually got released in more than select business or restricted and small areas.

The fact that some people still use 56K today is just sad beyond words.

DAOWAce said,
Now if only any of these internet breakthroughs made in the last 5 years actually got released in more than select business or restricted and small areas.

The fact that some people still use 56K today is just sad beyond words.

My first modem was 110 baud (BITS per second). We could only dream of 56K.

I'm paying Comcast $70 a month now for 50 mps speed.

So, what you're saying is, if Comcast had that speed, I would be paying about $100,000 a month for my Internet.

Sounds like a deal, sign me up!

I'd like to see what they could do with the tech of yesterday/... round up some old US Robotics 56K modems, a multiplexer, and an America Online CD from Blockbuster. The 3rd one might be hard to get a hold of though.

Massive data connections that are capable of speeds of 100Gb/s really only deliver between 12 and 25 Gb/s when they are configured to use the Internet. This is because of the inherent inefficiency of TCP/IP. Simply replacing TCP/IP with InfiniBand boosts connection speed up to 98 Gb/s, a huge increase. The only problem with InfiniBand is that is was designed to be used inside datacenters and has problems with distances longer than a few hundred meters.

Today there are a number of companies, particularly in Israel, Canada and China, working to solve this problem and extend datacenter InfiniBand fabric over long distances. There are already experimental links between USA and Europe delivering real 100Gb/s across the Atlantic. In Asia two supercomputers in Singapore and Tokyo are linked by 100 Gb/s InfiniBand. On a smaller scale NASA Ames and the Houston Flight Control Center have been linked by InfiniBand since 2007.

This technology is real and it's coming in the next 2-3 years. With it we'll see the first "fork" in the Internet - those with TCP/IP links and those with InfiniBand links. Enterprise will desert the Internet (TCP/IP) and use cheaper, faster and more secure private InfiniBand networks. Without enterprise customers to underwrite their bandwidth costs, websites like YouTube and Netflix will either have to switch to a pay-as-you-go model or fold. This will be fun to watch.

'Using the tech of today'
I wouldn't say using a much higher clock speed for the data rate is using the tech of today. There's no mention of how stable it is or how hot it gets or even how accurate the data transmission is over what length of fibre optic cable.

I think the lowest possible in my country is 2 Mbps. That's the absolute lowest, no one will sell you lower speed than that.

UXGaurav said,
Better than the paltry 1 Mbps I am stuck with :p

Same here, 1.3 on a good day...
obviously stuck in a backwards hellhole of a country in the middle of nowhere doesn't help...
oh wait no... I'm 5 miles outside the 3rd largest city in the UK and our "broadband" is an absolute joke.

Here neither but if i ever go over the 100gb volume limit on my 4Mbps connection, my ISP throttles my connection to a measly 256kbps so there's that.

Microsoft could use this to their advantage and stream Windows and applications to systems instead of having to install it. Users could opt in to keep their data local/synced or streamed.

Please say a big NO to cloud Windows.
That would be the perfect spy tool.

NSA/government would be very happy to take care of your data... without any warrant. ;-)

PS: A cloud Windows could be great for businesses, but for home use....?? No, thanks.

68k said,
No thanks. I prefer going for a nice drive to pickup software (on disc).

Enjoy it while you can, I can bet by 2018 you won't be able to do it anymore.

68k said,
No thanks. I prefer going for a nice drive to pickup software (on disc).

They don't care about you porn stash.

http://www.dtu.dk/english/News...c9da-4214-91f3-c9ed3f8a0e24

"The researchers achieved their latest record by using a new type of optical fibre borrowed from the Japanese telecoms giant NNT. This type of fibre contains seven cores (glass threads) instead of the single core used in standard fibres, which makes it possible to transfer even more data. Despite the fact that it comprises seven cores, the new fibre does not take up any more space than the standard version."

I would like 10 gig base t to be more affordable first. the 10gig base t blade cards for hp switches are like $5k each and 10 gig base t cards for servers are $300 to $500 each

Okay, but an NSA logger in series will drop the speed back down to around 100 Gbps. :)

I'm just wondering how they tested such speeds; are there ICs around that will take data in that fast?

I was hoping they would say what they did differently, when you are a tech person you like details, not just hey look what we did

remember that time when your movie buffered every five seconds and you couldn't watch anything? Well that might be a thing of the past if Danish scientists have their way.

Not had a film buffer like that for years. Also -whats special about the fibre? Isnt it just Os2 single mode fibre?

I found this English version of the original article: http://www.dtu.dk/english/News...c9da-4214-91f3-c9ed3f8a0e24

"The researchers achieved their latest record by using a new type of optical fibre borrowed from the Japanese telecoms giant NNT. This type of fibre contains seven cores (glass threads) instead of the single core used in standard fibres, which makes it possible to transfer even more data. Despite the fact that it comprises seven cores, the new fibre does not take up any more space than the standard version."