Dealer of Forged Microsoft Licenses goes to Jail

A German court has sentenced a 42-year-old Turkish software dealer to two years and 11 months in prison for distributing Microsoft Corp. products with forged licenses. The man was arrested in June 2006 by German police and had been held in custody until the court ruling. After eight days of hearings, the district court in Bochum, Germany, found the Turkish dealer guilty of reselling 18,555 products with forged licenses to other dealers ignorant of the illegal activity. Microsoft estimates the loss of the forged licenses at $5.2 million, including the money paid by customers who acquired software they were unable to use.

News source: ComputerWorld

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15 Comments

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Selling forged licenses is a really ugly thing, and doing in a huge volume of 18.5k should've got him much more than only 2 years and 11 months :angry:
But the big fish always get away lightly... they should rather concentrate their efforts on hunting down sellers of faked or otherwise illegal copies rather than pumping their money into "anti-piracy" crap which only annoys the average legal costumers

A thief is a thief and a receiver of stolen goods has no rights to those goods.
It does not matter whether $5.20 was stolen or $5.2million was stolen. It is still theft and the 'perp' must repay his debt to society.

you guys might want to try economics - its called "opportunity cost"

The way of looking at it is: what potential revenue is lost by making a certain decision (what was given up)

If you sell to someone for $10, but could have effectively sold to someone else @ $15, your opportunity cost is $5

It potentially cost you $5 to make that sale. - and yes these amounts are considered when forcasting, and doing "the books" of a corp. - so its not just Microsoft whining - that is "lost revenue"

But everyone's argument is also correct - these "potential sales" were only "potential" these people probably wouldnt have purchased...it doesnt make sense ...well it does to the bean counters...

What if the people who bought it wouldn't have bought it for the greater price? This same inane argument is used in the music industry. Chances are, most people are *not* going to be buying 5,000 songs. The average person might buy around 20 - 30 songs in one month, but not 5,000. Therefore, these aren't lost sales, because the person wasn't going to buy the songs anyway.

How did you ever pass math class?

$52 million is still $52 million. It affects the bottom line of a corporation way more than $5 would.

C_Guy said,
How did you ever pass math class?

$52 million is still $52 million. It affects the bottom line of a corporation way more than $5 would.


How did you pass math class?
Its $5.2 million in the article.

C_Guy said,
How did you ever pass math class?

$52 million is still $52 million. It affects the bottom line of a corporation way more than $5 would.

a) its 5.2 Million, not 52 million.

And this is what i hate about Microsoft (and other large corporations). Many of the people who bought these dodgy licenses wouldnt have been able to afford nor buy it from Microsoft. They wernt valid licenses, hence they wern't able to use microsoft's "premium" services.

Meaning that while, Microsoft may have lost a few potential sales (few in proportion to how many they sell), they havent LOST 5.2 million