Debate whether Chrome or IE is top web browser still rages

Will we ever really know if Chrome or Internet Explorer is the most used desktop web browser in the world? Based on data collected in August from rival research firms StatCounter and Net Applications, it is still murky on how many copies of Google or Microsoft's rival browsers are in active use.

StatCounter, which uses unique page views as its basis, shows that for the month of August, Chrome users had the top web browser market share at 42.78 percent. IE comes in second with 25.55 percent, followed by Mozilla's Firefox with 19.25 percent. Safari, Opera and other browsers are well behind the top three.

Chrome, IE and Firefox are also on top on Net Applications' list for August 2013, but in completely different positions. The firm, which uses unique visitors when gathering its data, shows the IE family on top in August with 57.60 percent. Firefox is second with 18.88 percent and Chrome is third with 16 percent. Again, Safari, Opera and other web browsers are far behind the top three.

StatCounter has blasted Net Applications' data gathering methods in the past, claiming its use of 'geoweighting' to add more Internet users in other countries, such as China, has lead to inaccurate results. Microsoft, which has used Net Applications' data in the past to promote the growth of IE, claims that its methods offer a better look at overall world Internet use.

In terms of individual web browsers, Net Applications shows that IE8 is on top for August with 21.65 percent, followed by IE10 at 18.65 percent. Chrome 28 is third with 9.97 percent, followed by IE9 with 9.02 percent and Firefox 23 with 7.15 percent. StatCounter has Chrome 28 on top for the month at 28.03 percent, with IE10 at 11.3 percent, IE8 at 8.27 percent, Chrome 29 at 8.24 percent and Firefox 23 at 7.51 percent.

Source: StatCounter and Net Applications | Images via StatCounter and Net Applications

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Only that it doesn't count the number of times people visit, but the number of unique visitors, and this information is collected for thousands of major shopping malls on the Internet, duplicates filtered out, and the results as a whole presented.

Sure, the analogy doesn't hold up if you block their tracking cookies, but I don't expect the number of people who actually do would account for more than a percent or two.

Northgrove said,
Only that it doesn't count the number of times people visit, but the number of unique visitors, and this information is collected for thousands of major shopping malls on the Internet, duplicates filtered out, and the results as a whole presented.

Sure, the analogy doesn't hold up if you block their tracking cookies, but I don't expect the number of people who actually do would account for more than a percent or two.


Errmm...Statcounter make a point of show VISITS not unique visitors. Net Applications are the ones who do unique visitors.

Northgrove said,
Only that it doesn't count the number of times people visit, but the number of unique visitors, and this information is collected for thousands of major shopping malls on the Internet, duplicates filtered out, and the results as a whole presented.

Sure, the analogy doesn't hold up if you block their tracking cookies, but I don't expect the number of people who actually do would account for more than a percent or two.


Statcounter doesn't count the unique visitors. It counts VISITS. One people visiting 1000 times counts 1000 times.

whatever it is.. Chrome usage is quite impressive for a browser that does not come pre-installed in every Windows machine, that alone justify Chrome as a current top browser.

digitheatre said,
whatever it is.. Chrome usage is quite impressive for a browser that does not come pre-installed in every Windows machine, that alone justify Chrome as a current top browser.

Except that it does! I think HP is bundling Chrome with their computers, so do a handful of others.

digitheatre said,
whatever it is.. Chrome usage is quite impressive for a browser that does not come pre-installed in every Windows machine, that alone justify Chrome as a current top browser.

Chrome OS? I mean, the OS is the browser...

digitheatre said,
whatever it is.. Chrome usage is quite impressive for a browser that does not come pre-installed in every Windows machine, that alone justify Chrome as a current top browser.
HP, Medion, etc. Beside, Chrome comes with a lot of other software like Flash Player, CCleaner, etc. It's malware.

And all the tech genius/guru's that told everyone to ditch IE for Chrome the last 5 years, or Firefox the years before that.
Don't care myself, I don't want Google installed on my system personally. (even though I do enjoy Chrome in the form of Ironware).
And these marketshares of Chrome will just attract much more malware writers that will get distracted from making crap for IE or FF.
So hereby, I thank thee Google.

Greetings from China. Here we have around 35% of the world's global internet and PC communities. Nobody here uses anything produced by Google (OK 2%). So if 35% of the world market wouldn't touch any Google product with a bargepole, how can it have 42% share? That would mean 63% of the people outside China use Chrome?

Fortunately, the Chinese don't have a word for "bollox".

Does it matter? I use Firefox and Safari on my Macs. Firefox and IE on my Windows 7 machines. Which one I choose that particular day, depends on where my finger feels like clicking.

I hate Chrome on Surface Pro. Scrolling is bad. DPI scaling makes it ugly. To correct this you can switch to Windows 8 mode, but it will force change your default browser to Chrome.

Firefox users leave a smaller footprint over the net using addons like ghostry, requestpolicy, etc etc, blocking all such irrelevant tracking; hence apparently trailing behind IE. Chrome on the other hand has all sorts of tracking & beacons enabled by default and there is no easy way to turn them completely off, besides the dirty deployment practices it has to get on all machines.

ShAsadAhmad said,
Firefox users leave a smaller footprint over the net using addons like ghostry, requestpolicy, etc etc, blocking all such irrelevant tracking; hence apparently trailing behind IE. Chrome on the other hand has all sorts of tracking & beacons enabled by default and there is no easy way to turn them completely off, besides the dirty deployment practices it has to get on all machines.
How does that matter? They counted whatever you have this on or of. It doesn't matter.

I'm not sure why people care. It's like talking trash about your favorite sports team but for geeks. I use them all for development and really there's almost no difference these days.

I am using Firefox and is still satisfied with it. I have not tried the latest version of the other two but who cares. In my job, almost all students ask me, "why don't we have Chrome installed in our laboratory." It just mean to say, Chrome is indeed much preferred by most of our students. And sadly, some think (especially the freshmen), web surfing is only Google Chrome.

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