Dell: Our corporate customers are still upgrading to Windows 7

In less than a year, Microsoft will cut off official support for Windows XP and has been urging its users, particularly large businesses, to transition to Windows 7 or 8 as soon as possible. This week, Dell stated that its own corporate customers are still trying to upgrade to Windows 7.

CNET reports that Dell's chief financial officer Brian T. Gladden stated this week during the company's quarterly conference call with analysts, "I think you continue to see Win 7 on the commercial side of the business. It's driving a refresh cycle."

And what about Windows 8? Gladden hinted strongly that most of Dell's business clients were not making the move to switch to Microsoft's latest OS, stating, "Windows 8 has been from our standpoint, not necessarily the catalyst to drive accelerated growth that we had hoped it would be."

It's too early to speculate if this is bad news for Microsoft. Windows 7, which launched over three years ago, is now the dominate version of Windows around the world, but the overall adoption of Windows 8 has been slower than Windows 7. Only time will tell if the large corporate customers that Dell serves will stick with Windows 7 for a while or if they will finally choose to install Windows 8 or Windows 8.1.

Source: CNET | Image via Island Dog

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I hate these stupid ads on Neowin. Whats with all the ads littering the article. You can even move the dang mouse without ads popping up constantly just because it passed over a word.

I'm really glad I managed to convince the board of directors to let me spend money on replacing our desktops with thin clients.

That was five years ago and absolutely no need to replace any clients now

If a corp is still waiting to upgrade this late it freaking serves them right . I hope they learn not to wait last min stupid lazy ass companies

Its called trying to make a profit in tough times. Companies call ill afford to waste money on needless upgrades to hardware and software, just to be on the "leading edge" of technology. If XP has served them well, then Windows-7 is a logical choice. If they are on Windows-7, they remain there. Consumers...they can spend as they wish on what they want.

I see a problem happening very soon with all this touchscreen stuff.

manufacturing and design can't make use of touchscreen. they use the pen tablets for cad/cam. or they use a mouse. But this could make or break MS. I wouldn't be surprised if MS doesn't address this issue and businesses look for an alternative OS

MS needs to allow for touchscreens when applicable, but still keep the legacy desktop for those who want/need it.

ChrisJ1968 said,

MS needs to allow for touchscreens when applicable, but still keep the legacy desktop for those who want/need it.

... which is why Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows 9, Windows 10... will have a desktop.

Whine whine whine, and ignore the obvious.

Hate to say it but Windows 8 offers little benefits to the majority of business users over Windows 7. I work in a small business and the mindset has gotten so against Windows that I haven't seen a non-apple purchase in a year now. Every new laptop is a MacBook (pro or air) and every new desktop has been an iMac but 99% of our workers need a modern web browser and some need Office. I think I'm the only person in the company who is running Windows 8 (and we don't have any policies as to what should people use - everyone can use whatever makes them get their job done faster). I doubt Windows Blue will do much to change that...

um, nobody thought businesses would rush to Windows 8 anyway.
It's mostly a consumer release.
Businesses in general, buy a Windows license, and are free to use whatever they want XP, Vista, 7, 8 etc.

Sheesh, can't believe I'm defending Windows 8 after ****ing fire when I first saw it

Yes, Windows-8 IS a consumer release. Microsoft' hawking Windows-8 as being useful for businesses is deceptive, at best. I guess "honesty" has become a thing of the past.

People need to remember, the start screen can function like the start menu. Windows 8 is just as good as Windows 7. I can still run orograms and games dating back from the 90s on Windows 8! People also need to remember, no one is forcing people to use Windows 8! If you dont want Windows 8, get a Windows 7 license or even vista!

Sure it can, but as a 100% desktop user I still cannot understand why I am being forced to go to a separate screen to launch an app I don't have a task-bar shortcut to? I am otherwise perfectly happy with 8, but this is annoying no matter how you look at it. Is it doable - sure, is it harder, yes it is.

Lone Wanderer Chicken said,
People need to remember, the start screen can function like the start menu. Windows 8 is just as good as Windows 7. I can still run orograms and games dating back from the 90s on Windows 8! People also need to remember, no one is forcing people to use Windows 8! If you dont want Windows 8, get a Windows 7 license or even vista!

Not all machines either are intended to be used. We send out a lot of machines as display/kiosk/touchscreen style machines. Not having a proper way to 1) boot a machine into the desktop and 2) Disable charms and hot corners launch an application makes Windows 8 a no go at the moment.

We shouldn't need to install a 3rd Party App to provide this functionality either. The "Kiosk Mode" is promising however again it only works for metro apps.

Were in no rush so support or write for WinRT until it's been out a few years, integrated properly with the desktop environment and going by Microsoft's past history of introducing new development languages and then dumping them off 3 years later any time within the next few years.

Over 100 machines at work running Windows XP. I installed my personal copy of Windows 8 Pro on the Optiplex 755 I use at work. I could get by with Windows XP, but the UI just feels dated, especially if I do have to use it when helping a student with something. It feels second nature though.

I believe the status for a lot of businesses right now, we are just going to run these existing machines to till they die then replace them. I understand the Ministry of Education in my country is planning to replace desktop computers and labs with Tablets (don't know how that is gonna work). Because learning basic productivity skills like preparing documents, spreadsheets, presentations and databases is still important.

I used to like that my area at work was still on XP since it's very basic but now everything is incredibly sluggish and worse still, we haven't moved because of one rather obsolete program.

A smart and wise move. This would also include those consumers whose computer use if mainly for content creation. Leave Windows-8 for the mobile and touch-centric users. Businesses have much better use for their money than to replace perfectly good hardware and software just to get the Windows (Metro) UI and the touted "security" or "stability" enhancements.

One of the ugliest pictures of Windows 7 that I've seen yet... as to the article, not surprised. New OS's don't often make it into business's.

No - they don't, and the biggest reason why isn't hardware - but software. If you have a critical (to your company or agency) line-of-business application that was written specifically for your business, then upgrading the application for the newer OS won't be cheap. I've mentioned - more than once, the example of a business upgrading from NT4WS to Windows 2000 across the entire enterprise - however, the costs of upgrading merely ONE such application threatened to sink the migration. (In other words, it wasn't the cost of Windows, or Office, or any of the non-customized software loaded on the desktop images, or even some of the other critical and custom SOFTWARE. One application was holding the company hostage.) Some developers - and this one wasn't exactly small - see OS upgrades as cash cows, especially those that write enterprise software.

Could it be that the reason is Windows 8 was just recently added as a option on the Optiplex line, (last month or so) and those are the main "corporate" systems Dell sells?

xendrome said,
Could it be that the reason is Windows 8 was just recently added as a option on the Optiplex line, (last month or so) and those are the main "corporate" systems Dell sells?

Not sure what you are talking about as we ordered some Optiplex (3010? Sorry not at the office to double check) with Win8 installed back in October when Win8 released.

Condere said,

Not sure what you are talking about as we ordered some Optiplex (3010? Sorry not at the office to double check) with Win8 installed back in October when Win8 released.

Weird, I ordered a total of 6 OptiPlex 3010s now. 4 of the normal towers and 2 of the super skinny ones and I definitely don't remember Windows 8 being an option until lately. I bought the 2 skinny ones like about 1 month ago and I remember it for those but the others were in December and January.

Not that I would have went with Windows 8 anyways, Windows 7 was a easy change because everyone (except Mac users) already had Windows 7 on their home PC anyways but Windows 8 would have drive them nuts. LOL I use Windows 8 on my machine and will put it on my work system but for everyone else, yeah.. prolly a no go.

We have been getting 3010s in since they dumped the 390s

Pretty much since day one they came with W8 and we have had to specify Windows 7.

This is partly due to MS thinking they have to realease new versions of it's OS for 2 reason.

1. To make money no matter how stupid looking/acting the OS is

2. To try and be like Linux where they update their OS every 6 months!! This one is way out there, but BOTH OS's are crazy to be releasing upgrades that fast!!

It's mostly about greed/money though!!

I'd be willing to bet most company's skip right over Windows 8 just like they did Vista.

Because enterprise is still in the middle of getting rid of XP in the first place. We only started going to 7 a couple of years ago. We're a small company so I imagine the big ones take even longer. No surprise here at all.

Agree. This isn't surprising at all. It took many businesses almost 10 years to upgrade from XP to Windows 7, so why would they upgrade to Windows 8 in six months? I work at a major investment bank and they're just now upgrading to Windows 7.

And users had Windows XP while 7 was out. All that says is that corporate users stay one OS version behind

Riva said,
And users had Windows XP while 7 was out. All that says is that corporate users stay one OS version behind

Quit making sense! Can't you see we're trying to slam Windows 8 here?

/s

This honestly shouldn't be a surprise to anyone. Most organizations only upgrade every second iteration or so. Licensing is certainly a large part of it, but so is software and hardware compatibility. If you have a core piece of software or hardware that's not compatible, or won't function the same under the new version your options are A) Pay for the upgraded software B) Stay on the old OS. Since most businesses are just now getting their line of business applications upgraded for 7, I don't see a lot of them jumping on 8. They'll probably wait for 9, or whatever comes next.

OrangeFTW said,
Funny how no one has mentioned yet that it's running a Windowblinds skin, not the normal W7 interface.

I figured it was Windowblinds, which doesn't change the fact its ugly as sin.

JHBrown said,
Look at that beautiful UI in that picture. Puts Windows 8 to shame. Anyhow, Windows 7 is the new XP.

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder."
I think it's hideous. Where is the translucency that make Windows Vista / Windows 7 stand out?

Even Windows 8 looks better, IMHO.

At work the Windows 7 Upgrade project has been going on since the Windows 7 release. It's ready for a certain percentage of departments, but a large number will have to continue to use Windows XP due to software not being compatible with Windows 7. It's becoming a challenge now since the hardware/drivers of newer machines are no longer compatible with XP.

zivan56 said,
At work the Windows 7 Upgrade project has been going on since the Windows 7 release. It's ready for a certain percentage of departments, but a large number will have to continue to use Windows XP due to software not being compatible with Windows 7. It's becoming a challenge now since the hardware/drivers of newer machines are no longer compatible with XP.


Could they not just put XP mode on the new PCs that need the unsupported programs?

Same problem where I work. Some departments have been upgraded and some have not and it has a lot to do with legacy apps that rely on IE6. Luckily all of these apps are being upgraded but its taking an awfully long time.

Majesticmerc said,

Could they not just put XP mode on the new PCs that need the unsupported programs?
I know we have two machines stuck on XP machines because that isn't a choice. Some of our legacy software that we no longer develop checks on install what OS is running and specifically looks for what the OS is instead of looking at for a certain OS or anything higher. The reason for that design decision was to insure the software never ran on a system that wasn't first verified but it is just annoying now with compatibility mode making that obsolete now.

It boils down to licencing costs for businesses. Windows & Office arn't exactly cheap. Even for the home user they are still priced pretty high - especially Office. Buying licences for dozens or even hundreds of machines is going to cost a fortune, and so businesses see it as a simple 'Why should we upgrade if XP is doing the job just fine?'

With that way of thinking, I can't blame people for not upgrading, since the only other path is pirating them, which isnt worth it if they get inspections.

Hahah, tell that Australian businesses who almost exclusively now use Macs and then you see them go out of business a few months later.

Iridium said,
Hahah, tell that Australian businesses who almost exclusively now use Macs and then you see them go out of business a few months later.

HAHAHAHA I HAVE SEEN THIS!! The stupid "CIO"s say yeah we will get macs- next minute bankrupt or shut down. They cost too much and there are always problems and when there is a problem it is an absolutely pain to fix- especially with the AIOs. Anyhow most businesses here are either on Win XP, 7 and a few i've been round at on 8.

Anarkii said,
It boils down to licencing costs for businesses. Windows & Office arn't exactly cheap. Buying licences for dozens or even hundreds of machines is going to cost a fortune

Yes, licensing costs ain't cheap - But surely IT departments should plan ahead and budget accordingly for an OS refresh every now and then!!

GreatMarkO said,

Yes, licensing costs ain't cheap - But surely IT departments should plan ahead and budget accordingly for an OS refresh every now and then!!

I don't think most companies upgrade every OS refresh...
Also, lol at all the idiots saying Windows 8 is a success and businesses are adopting it everywhere (people were thumping their chests when the DOD ordered Windows 8 licenses)

Sure some will upgrade but the fact that people are still choosing to buy older versions of the OS over Windows 8 shows that there's something wrong. Last time that happened was .... Vista..

Iridium said,
Hahah, tell that Australian businesses who almost exclusively now use Macs and then you see them go out of business a few months later.

Correlation does not imply causation. Business 101. If an extra 50k in debt/purchase made you go bankrupt (assumption that you have 50 employees that got a Mac instead of a PC), you would have been bankrupt the following month anyway. 1k per employee is nothing in business considering your paying 2k per month per employee on paychecks and chances are they are underpaid at that pay grade anyway. If you are going to make such a grand statement, at least consider the facts first.

EDIT: Don't bother with attempting to argue that over time they cost more. Smart businesses buy service plans which happen to cost around same across the big companies like Apple, Dell, HP, etc tend to cost most for HP anyway.

GreatMarkO said,

Yes, licensing costs ain't cheap - But surely IT departments should plan ahead and budget accordingly for an OS refresh every now and then!!

IT Depts can plan and budget as best they can, but if a CEO/Site Director decides hmm budgets need trimmed, its always the Machine refresh budget that goes first, IT doesn't make the CEO "money" it only saves or costs the company money, sadly this is reality in corporate IT

I wasnt trying to say that there is a direct correlation, im simply replying to notions of cost effective IT solutions by saying that in tough times for small business here in Australia are not met with tight budgets. Its simply a country where the desire to seem savy is more important than being so. Furthermore, IT is an important tool in modern business and keeping as much money spare to provide for a variety of technological endeavours would see most not going for a top brand of what is essentially an intel equivalent with a pretty shell and a logo that glows.

My uni is still screwing around with XP - they've been replacing some older (as in Core 2 Quads) with new Optiplex 9010 all in ones, with i5 and i7 CPUs, and chucking XP on them. Most of these machines run Windows, Office, and a few other basic apps as they're in general pools, so app compatibility isn't the excuse, and there's at least three rooms with Windows 7 running on the machines so not having access to it isn't the issue either.

Even more embarrassing - the standard amount of memory that comes with them is 8GB, which probably means that a good chunk of them are using less than half of the memory that they actually have.

It's frustrating having been using Windows 7 and 8 on my personal machines to have to go back to XP and have it running like a three legged rhinoceros.