Delta Airlines to upgrade their onboard Nokia Lumia 820s to 1520s

In August, Microsoft announced that Delta Airlines would be giving all 19,000 of its flight attendants Nokia Lumia 820 smartphones to use for customer service while on board the company's aircraft. Now there's word that those same employees will be getting a nice hardware upgrade in the near future.

During Microsoft's Convergence conference in Atlanta last week, Delta announced plans to swap out the Lumia 820 for the 6-inch 1520 smartphone from Nokia. ITBusiness.ca reports that while the 820 devices could take drink and meal orders from passengers in-flight, the larger 1520 model can be used for other services such as selling instant seat upgrades on the plane. Delta uses Microsoft's Dynamics AX backend software for its retail operations.

The smartphones will also be able to record credit card info from passengers and then send that data down to the ground while in flight, via Gogo's Wi-Fi service, to see if the card is valid. Previously, Delta took a passenger's credit card info but could not check to see if it was correct until the plane ended its flight.

Delta's pilots are already using another Microsoft hardware product, the Surface 2 tablet, as their permanent replacement for their old paper flight handbook.

Source: ITBusiness.ca | Image via Microsoft

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10 Comments

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Do the phones use wireless or Bluetooth with the central computer on the plane (to track stock levels and the like)? If so, the phones wouldn't be in flight mode. Meaning they make passengers put their phone into flight mode but they don't. Sounds like the phones upsetting the planes instruments is bulls***.

TheMagnificent11 said,
Do the phones use wireless or Bluetooth with the central computer on the plane (to track stock levels and the like)? If so, the phones wouldn't be in flight mode. Meaning they make passengers put their phone into flight mode but they don't. Sounds like the phones upsetting the planes instruments is bulls***.

You can use wireless and 3G/4G data on many, many planes once the plane is at cruise. ALl they would need to do is power the devices on when they're ready for use.

Hello,

I no longer fly Delta (had a very bad experience-not related to the Lumia rollout) but on other airlines I fly regularly (Alaska, United, US Airways), the handheld terminals they use tend to be ruggedized devices from companies like Intermec, Symbol/Motorola and so forth

Frankly, I'm surprised that a consumer-grade device like a phone would last a year-and-a-half in such an environment.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

Excellent illustrations for tablets and smartphones--extensive content consumption with limited content creation, and for which Windows-8's UI was designed.

19,000 phones to upgrade, I wouldn't use delta airlines at all after reading this, that's 19,000 devices that they're upgrading because they pretty much 'bought too small a device the first time' and could have instead bought the right device for the job the first time around and reduced their airline fees to passengers.

n_K said,
19,000 phones to upgrade, I wouldn't use delta airlines at all after reading this, that's 19,000 devices that they're upgrading because they pretty much 'bought too small a device the first time' and could have instead bought the right device for the job the first time around and reduced their airline fees to passengers.

that's like saying you wouldn't fly delta because they didn't buy planes that didn't exist when they bought the current fleet....

Keep in mind, that's also 18 months of heavy use. They probably needed to be replaced anyway. The story - if there is one - is simply that they're continuing to use WP8, instead of jumping to Android.

n_K said,
19,000 phones to upgrade, I wouldn't use delta airlines at all after reading this, that's 19,000 devices that they're upgrading because they pretty much 'bought too small a device the first time' and could have instead bought the right device for the job the first time around and reduced their airline fees to passengers.

You have no concept of how the airline industry works, or how fast turn over of heavy use products and technology happens.

A very expensive check-in kiosk lasts for about two to three years, and you are upset that a $500 handheld used on several flights a day is being replaced by a newer model?

(They aren't saying they are having to replace them cause they didn't work, sucked, or fell apart, they are upgrading them to offer new features.)

Wow... (Sorry for slight overreaction, I dated flight attendants, and I'm surprised they have units that survived a year, let alone 18 months.)

Mobius Enigma said,

Wow... (Sorry for slight overreaction, I dated flight attendants, and I'm surprised they have units that survived a year, let alone 18 months.)

Well, they are Nokias after all.