Deutsche Telekom: 512 Gbps on a single optical fiber channel

The future of networking is in the fiber, and Deutsche Telekom (DT) has just given a glimpse of what the upcoming future of Internet might hold: the German telecommunication company reached the remarkable transmission speed record of 512 Gigabits per second using only a single optical-fiber wavelength channel.

By using a new routing technology named OSIRIS (or Optically Supported IP Router Interfaces) and working in partnership with Alcatel-Lucent, DT’s T-Labs (Telekom Innovation Laboratories) have achieved the new speed record while sending digital data on a 734 kilometers-long route from Berlin to Hanover and then back to Berlin again.

DT states that aside from the 512 Gbps breakthrough, the usable bit rate of the transmission was “only” 400 Gbps or “the simultaneous transmission of 77 music CDs”. Still a quadrupled capacity per single channel on the current Deutsche Telekom optical fiber infrastructure, anyway, and a feat accomplished in real-world conditions not just in sanitized lab conditions.

By using all the 48 wavelength channels available on each one of its fibers, DT states, the OSIRIS tech could accomplish something like a 24.6 Terabits per seconds transmission rate (or a collection of 3.696 CDs at the same time). The best part of OSIRIS? There is no need to deploy new cables, telecom companies could double the transmission capacity of their networks by simply upgrading terminal stations for signal routing.

“We are very proud of having attained this tremendous transmission performance over the Internet under real-world conditions”, T-Labs Manager Heinrich Arnold said, highlighting the importance of the new successfully developed “innovative method by which the transmission capacity of optical fiber can be increased significantly in network operation”.

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I just wish companies would work on getting the higher speeds to lower cost switches. right now anything over 1 gig tends to not work together well and can be very expensive.

majortom1981 said,
I just wish companies would work on getting the higher speeds to lower cost switches. right now anything over 1 gig tends to not work together well and can be very expensive.

To be viable, the processing power required is a bit more than people realize.

Handling one single stream at this rate is hard to process, let alone when it is a lot of packets going various directions.

So no only is the loop hard to run on 'cheap' hardware, but the subsequent devices working from the switch also require a lot of cost and processing to be effective.

A good home router handling 100mbps Ethernet and Dual 5 & 2.5 N & G radios needs a dual-core 700mhz CPU to be effective, and this is a long ways from the data and traffic that 1gbps generations in large scale deployments.

It will get cheap, as even our $99 home routers would have been $5000 just 10 years ago.

As for not working well together, it comes down to the timing and the load processing, which at these rates is like timing a CPU and RAM when overclocking a PC, so there is going to be hurdles for a while.

JesseJ said,
3.696 is 3,696 for those of us who use commas. Over three thousand music CDs a second. That's a lot.

Not quite OVER 9000

While these speeds are all well and good, there's a rather big bottleneck that I can forsee - HDD/SSD read/write speeds.

To actually take advantage of those kinds of speeds, you would need a VERY big RAID array of SSD's. The fastest SSD's out at the moment write at, what, 1GB/s? And that's not even sustained write speeds, that'd be the peak speed.

So it'd take 64 of those bad boys to take full advantage of a 512Gbps connection - and majority of people don't even have a single SSD, let alone 64!

So while I love that optical fibre is getting even faster now, storage manufacturers need to start developing storage media with much faster I/O speeds.

/mini-rant

Dilligaf2008 said,
While these speeds are all well and good, there's a rather big bottleneck that I can forsee - HDD/SSD read/write speeds.

You're not wrong, but clearly this is 'backbone' tech. The sort of stuff ISPs will use to reduce contention so that we can more realistically promise everyone 50+mbps in the not-too-distant future.

The day we all have 500Gbps to our houses will be the day ISPs have a backbone which makes that look like 54k.

Dilligaf2008 said,
While these speeds are all well and good, there's a rather big bottleneck that I can forsee - HDD/SSD read/write speeds.

To actually take advantage of those kinds of speeds, you would need a VERY big RAID array of SSD's. The fastest SSD's out at the moment write at, what, 1GB/s? And that's not even sustained write speeds, that'd be the peak speed.

So it'd take 64 of those bad boys to take full advantage of a 512Gbps connection - and majority of people don't even have a single SSD, let alone 64!

So while I love that optical fibre is getting even faster now, storage manufacturers need to start developing storage media with much faster I/O speeds.

/mini-rant

Someday yes, this will be an issue... Today though this is for backbone, and large network infrastructure where there are 100s or 1000s or 10s of 1000s of computers using this bandwidth.

Even home gigabit switches/routers are only effective when there is high load with several devices and computers involved, and the 'loss' when dealing with the Ethernet technology that is before the gigabit levels.

and if speeds like that were here in North America, no doubt that the ISPs would keep the caps exactly the same while increasing the price

oh, and upload speeds would still be ****

timster said,
and if speeds like that were here in North America, no doubt that the ISPs would keep the caps exactly the same while increasing the price

oh, and upload speeds would still be ****

I think you would find that ISPs would be happy to implement this... it's upgrading their throughput by only upgrading the hardware. No needing to run additional fiber which is the most costly and time consuming part (planning, permits, community approval, yadda yadda)

notta said,
Why MPAA/RIAA will never allow this to see the light of day.

MPAA/RIAA = America

Deutsche Telekom = Germany

We're already deploying 200MBit here and it will roll out in large scale possibly quite soon. (not months maybe, but it's happening at a nice pace)

GS:mac

cralias said,

You friggin' deutschebag

C:\win


AWWWW hehe!

Well played!

Well, I guess it's EXTREMELY nerdy to be a fan of a telecommunications company, but yeah, that's what I am...

It's just that they provide me with really good service and they are the most solid company here and also have a wide portfolio of international market penetration.

GS:mac

simrat said,
Man, imagine watching porn in 1080p with this speed.

Well of course, that was the reason for its development!

simrat said,
Man, imagine watching porn in 1080p with this speed.

Cute... 1080p...

My internet connection eats 1080p for breakfast now already.

GS:mac

Glassed Silver said,

Cute... 1080p...

My internet connection eats 1080p for breakfast now already.

GS:mac

With around 24 Mbps of quality? I doubt it...

Arceles said,

With around 24 Mbps of quality? I doubt it...


Yes, my connection is 50MBit/s, I can stream two of them.

And that is not being subscribed to currently existing connections you can have at 200MBit/s (VDSL)

GS:mac

yes, of course! And in a village mostly you get only 1-3 mbit dsl. And there is no plans to update it. I'm dreaming about the day LTE is coming to us. Than i'll cancel the contract with DT and never-ever comeback. Well, until they make a optic line. But this will never happend, i'm pretty sure.

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