Developer outsourced his own job to China; watched cat videos before getting fired

There are a lot of hard working software developers in the world who are dedicated to their job and their employers. They show up to work every day and get their assignments done. This story is not about one of those developers but a person, who instead, got others in China to do his job.

This week, the Verizon security blog tells the story of a man they call "Bob", a developer at an unnamed "critical infrastructure company". Apparently this company called in Verizon sometime in 2012 when they noticed some odd VPN logs that had connections in China. The connections were centered on "Bob's" workstation.

The computer forensic team examined the evidence and discovered that "Bob" was outsourcing all of his work to Chinese software teams and paying them a fraction of his six figure salary to do so. That meant he could come to work and basically goof off; the Verizon blog states that "Bob's" real daily schedule of work consisted of him going to Reddit and eBay and watching cat videos like this one:

Obviously, this kind of activity (or non-activity, if you think about it that way) did not sit well with the unnamed company and they fired "Bob". He now has loads of time to go to Reddit and search for cat videos to watch; he's just not using company resources and money for it anymore.

Source: Verizon security blog
Via: The Next Web

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Well Verizon Wireless did always tell me to use my resources while working for them. This guy was just doing what they said!

Well, while I am sure he broke many contractual and security policies by doing this, surely he was just being smart and getting the same job done for less while taking a "fee"? I wonder if the company then went on to hire the Chinese guys

He should of set up a proxy for them to go into before getting access to the Verizon network to do his job. Partially smart of him, but if he did this he could of went on longer. Then he could tell them it is his home proxy. ha

He wouldn't have to tell them it was a proxy, just that it was his home computer.
He likely was allowed remote access, but who knows what they had for requirements to connect from there. Probably needed a vpn client, since they were using two phase auth.

However, if they were using a client such as the cisco client and didn't disable split tunneling, he could allow the Chinese to connect to his tunnel (local) and route things to his work vpn network.

Or just allow them to remote desktop into a vm on his home network that was authorized to connect to the company vpn. No one would think anything was odd about that, were it allowed, except that it would be logged in at weird times of the day.

Edited by ahinson, Jan 16 2013, 5:05pm :

ahinson said,
He wouldn't have to tell them it was a proxy, just that it was his home computer.
He likely was allowed remote access, but who knows what they had for requirements to connect from there. Probably needed a vpn client, since they were using two phase auth.

However, if they were using a client such as the cisco client and didn't disable split tunneling, he could allow the Chinese to connect to his tunnel (local) and route things to his work vpn network.

Or just allow them to remote desktop into a vm on his home network that was authorized to connect to the company vpn. No one would think anything was odd about that, were it allowed, except that it would be logged in at weird times of the day.

HAHAHA, you put a lot of thought into this... LOL

Does not have to be wierd times. He could of specified what times of day (LOCAL) the work needed to be done. Even if it was in the middle of the night he could explain that off easy and made to look good for doing so much extra work at home. He might of been able to twist it to management as a reason to telecommute most days.

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