Digital Storm introduce thin gaming PC, Bolt

OEMs like Dell, HP and Acer have been churning out PC’s for the masses for years. As technology moves on, specs are changed. Form factors vary depending on what size of machine you want to go for and a number of different consumers are targeted, from casual internet users to gamers. But if small and powerful is what you’re after, look no further than the Bolt.

Vendors like Digital Storm and Alienware are renowned for providing users with extremely powerful custom built gaming PCs, but in most cases, at a premium. The Bolt is likely to compete with Alienware’s X51 desktop.

There isn't much configuration options available, with the exception of changing the optical drive, when choosing which of the four models you want to go for. When comparing the Bolt and X51, cost is likely to be the deciding factor in swaying consumers between the two. The Bolt is noticeably more powerful, offering an SSD and HDD in the more premium models, but that power does come at a cost.

 


Bolt


X51

 

Good

Better

Best

Ultimate

Hero

Powerhouse

Improved

Loaded

CPU

Core i3-2100

Core i5-3570K

Core i5-3570K

Core i7-3770K

Core i3-2120

Core i5-3330

Core i5-3330

Core i7-3770

RAM

8GB

8GB

8GB

16GB

6GB

6GB

8GB

8GB

GPU

GeForce GTX 650 Ti 2GB

GeForce  GTX 660 2GB

GeForce  GTX 660 Ti 2GB

GeForce GTX 680 2GB

GeForce GT 640 1GB

GeForce GT 640 1GB

GeForce GTX 660 1.5GB

GeForce GTX 660 1.5GB

Storage

1TB

1TB

60GB SSD + 1TB HDD

120GB SSD + 1TB HDD

1TB

1TB

1TB

1TB

Price

$999

$1,249

$1,599

$1,949

$699

$849

$1,049

$1,199

It’s good to see that this level of performance from a PC can be housed in a form factor not much bigger that the Xbox 360. The Bolt measures 3.6" x 13.3" x 13.4", with the Xbox 360 measuring 3” x 10.6” x 10.4”.

Source and Image: Digital Storm | X51 image from Alienware.com

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I've always built my own rigs and would never buy a pre-built, no matter who built it, but there are several things that a pre-built will give you that you won't get from building your own. 1) Tech support, 2) a piece of mind that when you buy it, it'll work, 3) better warranty services.

Not everyone is well-verse enough to build their own computer and if they care about end-user services, these would be nice...

I'll take the Pepsi challenge any day of the week component for component as these systems use a variety of video cards. I'm a video editor not a gamer and only need the 660 for the cuda cores until I pick up a Quadro board. The POINT is what whatever you're looking for, if you build it yourself, you can do better, I thought the point was obvious...at least to most.

No offense to the guy who cheaped out above, but if you bought a machine with a Geforce 660 and you think it's anywhere close to the 680, you need to do some more research.

There's a reason that the bargain basement 660s are in the low $200s and the 680s are in the upper $400s. You should have spent the extra $250. You still would have been under the cost of the ones with the nice custom cases in your huge off-the-shelf case, but you would have ACTUALLY been faster instead of just THINKING you were.

Last month I was looking at all the makes for a new rig, I felt they were all grossly overpriced. Remember when it was actually cheaper to buy an assembled machine vs building one? Not anymore it seems.

Anyway, I ended up building a a new top end machine that beats both of these in every respect for around $1200 (3770k 4.5ghz, 32GB RAM, nvidia 660 2GB, ASUS deluxe board, Samsung SSD, Noctua cooling, Corsair Gold Power, 300R case and more) Looks good and performance is amazing.

Don't be afraid to build your own, and hour's research and the rest is very easy, you'll end up with more bang for your buck.