DirectX 10 Compatibility Libraries Preview

The Alky Project is a set of DirectX 10 compatibility libraries, pioneered by Cody Brocious, a 19 year old software reverse-engineer from San Diego.

These libraries allow the use of DirectX 10 games on platforms other than Microsoft Vista, and increase hardware compatibility even on Vista, by compiling Geometry Shaders down to native machine code for execution where hardware isn't capable of running it. No longer will you have to upgrade your OS and video card(s) to play the latest games.

The current preview allows you to run a number of examples from the DirectX SDK on Windows XP. Future builds in the coming months will progress from demos to fully functional games.

Download: DirectX 10 Compatibility Libraries Preview | Size: 824 KB
View: Alky Project

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25 Comments

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actually i hope this allows full use of DX10 compliant cards on wXP while being able use native abilities of GPU (aka GS) ...

that bonus with ability to run DX10 game on DX9 hardware is nice yet perf loss is big Q ...

This is the equivalent of pixel shader emulation for Geforce MX cards. In other words, It means nothing for people who actually want to run dx10-based software in playable speeds.

chaosblade said,
This is the equivalent of pixel shader emulation for Geforce MX cards. In other words, It means nothing for people who actually want to run dx10-based software in playable speeds.

how much of a big deal is it anyway?

how many DirectX10 games actually require DirectX 10 hardware? i don't know of any DX10 games other than Halo 2 - and does it even require DirectX 10 hardware? there is no way a developer would make it require DX10 hardware. it probably requires DX8/9.

it just requires DirectX10 software to be loaded. Microsoft said this was only possible on Vista. having it on XP would prove otherwise. in both cases (XP and Vista), it is using SOFTWARE DX10, since most people dont have DX10 cards.

Halo 2 does not use DX10 at all. It's "Vista only" because MS used some Vista-only technique to give it a more console-like loading behavior (No huge install time, loads levels partially as you go along). Purely MS' decision to start using that as an alternative to installers and not really a technical limit related to the engine\graphics.

Try playing games without pixel shader support at all (the case for older MX cards). Not possible. Nowadays, Thank god, even the lower end cards have the basic support, even if at lower performance. The coming generation of games will probably blend DX9 with DX10 (read: have fallback modes or renderer choice), So software libraries like this one can help, but performance WILL suffer regardless, As it did with pixel shader emulation.

The requirement is Directx 10, Either hardware based (performance scales according to card's abilities), Or software based (relatively worse performance all around, based on CPU\Memory rather than GPU since we're doing software emulation).

MioTheGreat said,
There are some new features provided with DirectX 9.0Ex, the version of DX9 included with Vista that Halo 2 might be using.

Nothing new or special though, mainly small bugfix type things and things to do with lost devices. In other words, nothing you'll notice in game.

These libraries allow the use of DirectX 10 games on platforms other than Microsoft Vista, and increase hardware compatibility even on Vista, by compiling Geometry Shaders down to native machine code for execution where hardware isn't capable of running it. No longer will you have to upgrade your OS and video card(s) to play the latest games.

Meaning geometry shaders are emulated in software? To get around this bottleneck is what resulted in graphics rendering making the shift to GPUs in the first place.

neufuse said,
This will be slow especially since its doing run time code translation :blink:

Why don't you try the demo and see for yourself?

So much for if You want dx10 games it's either Vista or xbox360. I guess this is one more lie MS was caught in, that dx 10 is dependant on new driver architecture or benevelant and BSODless(sarcasm) WDM driver model...lol MS pwnt!

Yogurth said,
So much for if You want dx10 games it's either Vista or xbox360. I guess this is one more lie MS was caught in, that dx 10 is dependant on new driver architecture or benevelant and BSODless(sarcasm) WDM driver model...lol MS pwnt!

When John Carmack said DX10 was a bunch of marketing hype, I'd take his word over that of a Microsoft press release.

Now we have proof that Carmack was right.

I just hope that game devs take advantage of this stuff and don't force us to buy Vista just to play some games. That's because games are the ONLY reason I would even consider upgrading to Vista. I have no other need for Vista, nor do I want to deal with the hassle of it for some minuscule benefit.

Maybe in a couple of years I'll upgrade, but I don't see any reason to now.

Danrarbc said,
Heh, you might actually have a point if Halo 2 works on this. Otherwise it's just a bunch of BS.
Halo 2 isn't a DirectX 10 game, this product has no bearing on Halo 2. Halo 2 just requires Vista to run since it has the Games for Windows Live! stuff built in, which is also Vista only.

toadeater said,
Now we have proof that Carmack was right.

No we don't. All we have are some libraries that allow a few DX10 SDK code samples to run on XP.

Proof will come when a game can run in DX10 mode on XP.

Emulating DirectX is different than the MS implementation of it, DX10 on Vista might very well require the new driver model, but emulating the API on top of DirectX 9 obviously doesn't.

Look at DirectX ontop of OpenGL for a good example.