DirectX 10.1 in Windows Vista SP1 – The Evolution

As Windows Vista brought to the table the exclusive DirectX 10, the first service pack for the operating system will evolve Microsoft's graphics technology to version 10.1. DirectX 10.1 is already available to over 12,000 testers via the first beta of Vista Service Pack 1, concomitantly with the official release of Build 6001.16659. Although the testing milestones of Vista, Windows Server 2008 and Windows XP SP3 Beta, are officially limited in terms of access, a hack is available designed to permit the download of Windows Vista SP1 Beta Build 6001.16659 straight from Microsoft, and simultaneously test drive DirectX 10.1.

However, Vista users have to understand that DirectX 10.1, as well as DirectX 10 is a technology intimately connected with the underlying graphics card, such as the upcoming ATI Radeon HD 3800 Series. According to an AMD whitepaper focused on the implementation of DirectX 10.1 in the ATI Radeon HD 3800 Series, the latest application programming interface from Microsoft, manages to "unlock the state of the art in GPU technology."

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They should make a DX10.1 USB dongle that punches you in the face for being such a turd and dropping all your money on GPUs. Send some of that money to one of those Nigerian guys who sent you an e-mail. Sheesh.

DirectX 10.1 Removes DX 8.0 support from DX10. With them removing CAPs. So you will have DX9.0EXT aka DX9.0L and DX10.0 / 10.1 in Vista. One of the reason Why DirectX 10 isn't on XP is its a total shift in how Windows works. If you split the OS into layers. In the old days DX ran on top of the application that requested it. In Vista DX runs below the Application Layer. Everything is DirectX even if its Word. Below = Very Simple version of layers. This would also explain why you might get some artifacts when alt tabing between a game and not having enuff Video Memory. This also explains why some people also hate Vista for its performace for general work. If you have a poop video card vista experience normal sucks.

Old Days (XP)
DX
App
Shell
OS Services
Kernal / HAL


Now (Vista)
App
Shell
DX -- OS Services
Kernal / HAL

Jeez Louise! What awful reporting the last few days. What this Neowin post neglects to mention is that this information is third hand. It's a Softpedia article that quotes PARTS of a version 0.4 (incomplete) ATI report about one video card model series (HD 3800). 1 out of 5.

I doubt we will be seeing any DX10.1 games in the near future. They can't even manage to create smooth DX10 games as of yet (and there are no pure DX10 games as far as I know).

Boramas said,
Pure dx10 games......world in conflict.......crysis.....

Oh, yes... Crysis is a pure DirectX 10 game. That's why it runs on XP.

World In Conflict runs on XP too.

A "Pure" DX 10 game would be one that can only run under DX 10. And so far, there's no such animal.

Boramas said,
Pure dx10 games......world in conflict.......crysis.....

Those games are not 'pure' DX10 games. They are DX9 games with DX10 effects. Pure DX10 games will require you to be on Vista with a DX10 capable video card. And as far as I know, these games can be run on Windows XP with a DX9 card.

I don't really like the thing about "pure" Direct-something games. Because you don't write games only using DX10 effects, because even DirectX 10 is an evolutionary release. You can't even really write a game that makes any sort of sense in the normal meaning of the word by only using DirectX 10 API functions, even if you wanted to.

Yes, DX10 requires a new driver model, but most of the software API is still shared with previous versions of DirectX.

There's nothing stopping a game developer from requiring Vista + DX10 though, but I don't see a compelling reason to enforce such a thing, besides for saving time and Quality Assurance checks in verifying it looks reasonable without the DX10 effects.

Compare to programming for Win32. Yes, you can use new Vista API functions and now your app will require Vista unless you write fallback mechanisms. But that still doesn't make it a "pure" Vista app in the sense that it *only* uses the new Vista API functions. Most of the Win32 API use the same functions since Windows NT 4. A Vista app could be an app that uses a blend of Windows NT 4 / 2000 / XP / Vista features, but it's Vista that becomes the lowest common denominator, hence that OS is required.

In the same fashion, DX10 games of course may and will use DX8/DX9/etc features, and they'll never be "pure" in that they only use the new and latest stuff. I'd rather than calling it "pure" just call it something that requires DirectX 10.

DX10 is the biggest scam in computer graphics history. It is just DX9 with an OS check. Turning on DX10 options in games drops your performance by 10% (on top of the 10% you lose just being in Vista). As soon you enable any DX10-specific features in a game, you lose even more performance. The kicker is that all these effects can be done in DX9 but Microsoft is actively soliciting game developers to purposely disable that functionality (ex: Crysis, where a simple text file change can enable DX10 effects in DX9). On top of that, card manufacturers are asking Microsoft to make each new version of DX incompatible with the previous so that they can sell more hardware. These companies need to be smacked down a peg in court.

You got that right about the decrease in performance. Where is the touted increase it was going to give us? All I have seen in Vista is lower performance compared to XP even after a years worth of driver releases. For shame Microsoft and nVidia.

edit: Anyone who says that games run better then in XP is just plain lying out of their a****, simple as that.

stgeorge said,
DX10 is the biggest scam in computer graphics history. It is just DX9 with an OS check. Turning on DX10 options in games drops your performance by 10% (on top of the 10% you lose just being in Vista). As soon you enable any DX10-specific features in a game, you lose even more performance. The kicker is that all these effects can be done in DX9 but Microsoft is actively soliciting game developers to purposely disable that functionality (ex: Crysis, where a simple text file change can enable DX10 effects in DX9). On top of that, card manufacturers are asking Microsoft to make each new version of DX incompatible with the previous so that they can sell more hardware. These companies need to be smacked down a peg in court.

People were saying similar things about SM3.0. 3 years later and there's a bunch of ATI users crying because Bioshock doesn't work.

stgeorge said,
As soon you enable any DX10-specific features in a game, you lose even more performance.

Really? I never would have imagined that by increasing the visual effects it would slow down performance. There has always been a tradeoff between visual quality and performance when it comes to games. You don't seem to understand that DX10 improves the visual quality, not the performance. It's like complaining that you lower your fps when enabling anti-aliasing.

It is just DX9 with an OS check

What? It's a serious rearchitecturing of how DirectX works. Previous versions have run on newer frameworks, they've made so many changes here that that is not the case.

Wow you are clueless. No, it's not DX9 with an OS check. Yes, you can enable some of the features but not all, and the ones you can only run in software and not hardware.
Most games out now are hybrid games. Built for DX9 but work on DX10. You won't really see big differences until games are exclusively DX10 and programmers have time to use all the new features.

No, there is also no 10% performance loss in Vista. For me I have 0 performance loss over XP. In some cases I even have better FPS. It was all about getting better drivers and those are here.

BrainDedd said,
You will be able to use DX10.1 on a DX10 card but you won't get the new features.

There are no new features. Just bug fixes and tighter specs.

No, Dx10.1 requires new hardware to utilize the new features. The current 8 series cards (including the new 8800GT) can only use the Dx10 feature set.

I probably wouldn't worry to much about it though, considering how well Dx10 is doing at the moment, there probably won't be a huge rush of Dx10.1 games any time soon I think

A DirectX 10 card will be able to use the DirectX 10.1 features that is in common with DirectX 10.

So only the (very small) subset of unique DirectX 10.1 features won't be usable by a DirectX 10 card. Actually, DirectX 10.1 is in part just a tighter definition of the *required* features of a graphics card, and I wouldn't be surprised if many DirectX 10 cards already have those. Like obligatory support for 4xFSAA. That's in DirectX 10.1, but not DirectX 10. Still, I bet most if not all Geforce 8's have that already?

Here's more: http://www.neowin.net/index.php?act=view&id=42004