DNS blocking to be removed from SOPA

In a move certain to please (but not pacify) lovers of the free interwebz everywhere, Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), the 'father' of SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) has agreed to remove passages that would have allowed the government to block foreign websites accused of copyright infringement, according to a statement released on his website.

After consultation with industry groups across the country, I feel we should remove Domain Name System blocking from the Stop Online Piracy Act so that the Committee can further examine the issues surrounding this provision. We will continue to look for ways to ensure that foreign websites cannot sell and distribute illegal content to U.S. Consumers.

The provision in the law allowing DNS blocking has been at the center of the controversy surrounding the bill, with some experts warning that it could literally and figuratively break the internet. While the denizens of the web might be breathing a sigh of relief right now, groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation are quick to point out that, from their point of view, at least, 'the fight continues.' In a statement they released today, the EFF said that:

It's heartening to see Congress take steps in the right direction, and it wouldn't have happened without the work and commitment of the many internet communities who have rallied to fight these dangerous bills. We should be proud of the progress we've made.

But let's be clear – we still have a long fight ahead and we face formidable foes... So let's keep the pressure on!

On a related note PIPA, the Protect-IP Act, a similar bill being looked at by the Senate, is also encountering growing opposition. Once again, provisions involving DNS blocking are the cause for controversy. Even the bill's biggest sponsor, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), said yesterday that they should slow down and consider the effects the law could have on the internet.

One of the main reasons these bills are encountering so much opposition, not only from activists and, yes, pirates, but also from the general public, is the fact that they are written in near total ignorance to how the internet works, in every sense of the word. Without any familiar analogues, lawmakers have a hard time 'getting' the internet, either culturally or technically.

It's not the same as TV, it's not the same as the press, it's not the same as anything. You can't just rip a piece of it out and mess with its fundamental structure and expect everything to keep going smoothly. Until it gets approached by someone who actually knows what they are doing, any legislation involving the internet is just asking for trouble. Countering piracy might be a legitimate goal, but taking cues from Iran and North Korea ain't the way it's done.

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Good, but only a small victory. The law is flawed. It's the wrong way to attack piracy altogether. Despite this change, Google would still need to censor search results, and that automated censorship would no doubt catch legit sites too. It's a problem the Chinese are all too familiar with...

Information has to be free.

If the system we have doesn't work with free information, then should we make information not free? No. We have to change our system.

i will buy the original copy of windows 8 and post it online , so the File can be share. that not illegal i pay for the software, since is my i pay for it can do what ever i want. and Sopa can do nothing about it if i want to share it.

Gaara sama said,
i will buy the original copy of windows 8 and post it online , so the File can be share. that not illegal i pay for the software, since is my i pay for it can do what ever i want. and Sopa can do nothing about it if i want to share it.

Riiiiiight. Good luck with your lawsuit with Microsoft for doing 'whatever you want' with your copy of Windows 8.

The Stark said,
1. Capture all politicians around the world
2. Put them on a lonely island, far away from the land
3. ???
4. Profit

5. Use Ion Cannon in orbit just to be safe...

Tony. said,

5. Use Ion Cannon in orbit just to be safe...


6. Sharks with laser beams on their heads patrolling the waters around the island, in case any of the politicians get the idea of swimming to safety.

PIPA is an acronym for "PROTECT IP Act", which in turn is an acronym for "Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act".

Even the bill's biggest sponsor, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont), said yesterday that they should slow down and consider the effects the law could have on the internet.

You're supposed to do that before writing the law, not after.

Aethec said,

You're supposed to do that before writing the law, not after.

If they did it that, how are they going to fake you out into thinking they are actually doing something?!

What a bunch of non thinking, ignorant a**holes we have elected! Must be a prerequisite to get elected?

What strikes me is that it appears that everyone is up in arms about this bill, but hardly anyone has actually read it. This bill appears to be a list of punishments for violations of the Lanham Act. Isn't this what the Judicial System is for? Everyone is ranting about DNS. Yes, it's a very important subject. However, people should be more outraged at the entire scope of this legislation and that even if SOPA is blocked, it just means they'll quietly slip in PIPA while everyone celebrates.

Get informed and read the bill. Know what you're standing up for!

http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c112:H.R.3261:

"Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), the 'father' of SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act)........After consultation with industry groups......"

He should have done this first. Maybe he would have never proposed this stupid action in the first place.

he's agreed to remove DNS blocking? - what a nice guy.

Shame almost every ISP has decided to ignore him, so whatever he proposes will be totally irrelevant anyway.

Take away DNS blocking? That's like telling the cop who stopped you "Sorry officer, I was only speeding because I'm drunk"

Soon we will be left with no freedoms at all. Ridiculous!

That actually used to be a law that you could not be charged for anything while you were drunk such as killing someone in a car accident because of the fact that you did not mentally mean to do it.. kind of like being mentally ill.. the law has changed since then

superconductive said,
Take away DNS blocking? That's like telling the cop who stopped you "Sorry officer, I was only speeding because I'm drunk"
Soon we will be left with no freedoms at all. Ridiculous!

it's pretty damn pointless as well because the owners/visitors of the blocked site could just tell everyone the IP address, and it would be business as usual.

So if they see how much this is upsetting people why don't they just drop this bill? Surely they can find some people who actually know about the internet and how it works. Then let them come up with some ideas that would help with cutting down on IP theft without causing large problems with sites and people who arent doing anything illegal.

Seems to me that just like people on the street selling illegal dvds, it's a problem you won't ever be able to completely get rid of. I don't think that the RIAA and MPAA see that for the fact that it is. If people want to download music/movies/games on the internet they will do it. The only way to completely stop it is to turn the internet off.

The cat is out of the bag when it comes to piracy and you are never going to get it back in. I think it's time the lawyers and executives got that through their heads.

They have cut down illegal sales of DVD's in the US to such a small percentage because they made it that you can get into trouble and the government can close down your business if you are doing things illegal..

If you want to get rid of illegal downloading you need to be able to make it nearly impossible for those people to make a profit.. If their site is closed down (much like a physical business is) then they would not be able to make money..

Your arguement is like saying that to stop illegal DVD's from being sold they need to close every business in the world.. no, but they need to shutdown the ones that are breaking the law.

Lachlan said,
They have cut down illegal sales of DVD's in the US to such a small percentage because they made it that you can get into trouble and the government can close down your business if you are doing things illegal..

If you want to get rid of illegal downloading you need to be able to make it nearly impossible for those people to make a profit.. If their site is closed down (much like a physical business is) then they would not be able to make money..

Your arguement is like saying that to stop illegal DVD's from being sold they need to close every business in the world.. no, but they need to shutdown the ones that are breaking the law.

Right, but the broadness of the bill would allow a power-hungry individual to shut down nearly any site they want to.

Lachlan said,
They have cut down illegal sales of DVD's in the US to such a small percentage because they made it that you can get into trouble and the government can close down your business if you are doing things illegal..

If you want to get rid of illegal downloading you need to be able to make it nearly impossible for those people to make a profit.. If their site is closed down (much like a physical business is) then they would not be able to make money..

Your arguement is like saying that to stop illegal DVD's from being sold they need to close every business in the world.. no, but they need to shutdown the ones that are breaking the law.

But therein lies the fundamental misconception. SOPA doesn't stop people from offering pirated material at all, it simply tries to hide them. To use your analogy, its like shutting down a business selling illegal DVDs, but not dealing with the business owner, who is then simply able to pick up his merchandise, take it to a new place, and set up shop again.

As WesDog put it, the cat is out of the bag now. Piracy is here to stay, and in a digital environment, traditional copyright laws don't hold up when copying is as easy as CTRL+C, CTRL+V. The only way to beat it is to innovate, not impose their archaic business model on a new platform.