DRM lobby scrambles to block HD DVD crack

A digital rights management (DRM) licensing authority is strong-arming search firms, bloggers and open source advocates in a desperate attempt to stop the spread of a software key that disables copyright protection on Blu-ray and HD-DVD disks.

Copyright reform activist Cory Doctorow decided on Monday to remove the information from a group blog to which he contributes after receiving a cease-and-desist letter from the Advanced Access Content System Licensing Administrator (AACS-LA).

The AACS-LA is backed by technology vendors including IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Sony and Walt Disney, and oversees the Advanced Access Content System (AACS) DRM technology used on high-definition DVDs.

The so-called processing keys published on the blog let users disable the DRM that prevents users from copying the disks or playing them on unlicensed equipment or software.

View: Vnunet.com

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<< HD-DVD Crack Code >>

If you put on fire this code you can see some symbols, translating this symbol you can read:

"One DRM to rule them all, One DRM to find them, One DRM to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them"

:-P

Wow... their scramble is working well. Additionally, I've sent e-mails to my senators and representatives with the key as a signature.

Just changing the key is one thing if it were tied to a single disc key. But this is a volume key that works on a variety of discs. Changing it wouldn't matter much since we would KNOW it changed, and we KNOW what to look for.

320,000 results from google,

exactly how are they gonna cease-and-desist everyone?

but if they change the key, won't the new key be cracked again?

my guess is newer discs will use a different number maybe, leaving current discs playable and copyable but the new batches not copyable? but like anything, im sure the new number will just be cracked again

Quite the opposite I think. If current players are using this key, and the key is changed, existing discs will work fine. Future discs, however, using the "new" key will be unreadable by the player, as the players out now won't have the new key installed. I suppose a firmware update could fix that, but still... that's a major undertaking for the non-tech user to have to figure out in order to appease the AACS gods.

If they revoke the key and issue new ones, current disks will still play, new disks won't (new players can still play the old disks)

And since the HD-DVD spec mandates a Ethernet connection for updates, it won't be that big a problem to roll out new keys.

Except they won't give a new key out to a player that can be hacked again, so if the manufacturer can't fix that with a firmware update the player will be no good for future releases as it won't be issued a new key.

I think it'd be pretty much impossible to find a player that can't be hacked.

Computers are easier than hardware, but with enough time the hardware can be broken as well (and sometimes it's dead easy, e.g. the MS HD-DVD drive sending the key unencrypted to the player.

The_Decryptor said,
If they revoke the key and issue new ones, current disks will still play, new disks won't (new players can still play the old disks)

And since the HD-DVD spec mandates a Ethernet connection for updates, it won't be that big a problem to roll out new keys.


Except Joe Schmoe won't know that and will just get uppity that his new disk doesn't play. First he'll think it's the disk (which most stores will try to refuse refunds [as no copy will work] / exchanges for), then he'll think it's the player (and how will he find out that a firmware upgrade is required and how to do it?)

Ivand said,
seems like your google is broken :P


Results 1 - 10 of about 322,000 for 09 F9 11 02 9D...

looks like yours is to

Results 1 - 10 of about 979,000 for 09 F9 11 02 9D....

They didn't care about the actual computer code to decode the files, they are upset about a number, one at which they can revoke at any time.

So now neowin will be sued as well. Three times in a row :-)

<< circumvention code >>

<< circumvention code >>

<< circumvention code >>

I think they already changed the key, that's why WinDVD had that update. But this doesn't help with any bluray/hddvd movies already made and out in stores right now, only for future ones.

or even better dump DRM as it is a load of rubbish and find a protection scheme that works, or better still, give up on copy protection adn stop wasting so much money on it and just make stuff cheaper, people will buy cheap, but people will not buy something they cant use on what they want to use it on.