DVD Players Outnumber VCRs in US Homes

Nielsen has found out some very interesting statistics for VCRs and DVDs in American homes. The year 2006 has resulted in 79.2% of all American households having at least one VCR and 81.2% having a DVD player. When Nielsen tracking the numbers in 1999, 88.6% of households reported owning a VCR and a mere 6.7% owned a DVD player. It doesn't take an Einstein to figure out that DVD player use has rocketed over 7 years. That fact, however, doesn't mean that VCRs have disappeared from American households.

News source: PVR Wire

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Yeah, if you have an old TV, then the best DVD will still only look and sound so good. On my 1080i capable TV I watch DVDs in 720p and in 5.1 DTS or Dolby Digital surround. No VCR can come close to the quality of that. Based on what normal TV looks like (usually better than VHS if I remember right) a VHS tape would look like utter crap compared to a progressive scan DVD player.

I have a DVR as part of my digital cable box, so I don't need to tape shows on a VCR.

Besides, I rent all the DVDs I want for $15/mo through Blockbuster... I haven't seen a VHS tape in a movie store in years.

Heck, even all my old home videos taken by my grandfather that were on VHS a few years ago have been recorded onto DVD now, since the DVD medium is more reliable over the long term.

Now you want to talk about a technology that's not all it's cracked up to be... Blu-Ray... ugh... what a waste.
I saw a demo station in Best Buy of Blu-Ray and for one the DVD comparison on there was total ****, nothing like what a DVD really looks like, and aside from the high-def colors being really nice the picture on the Blu-Ray side was still visually compromised on the plasma they had the thing hooked up to... you could still see loads and loads of compression artifacts and pixelated images. Definitely not worth the upgrade as it stands right now.

Quote - Hooya said @ #11.2

Now you want to talk about a technology that's not all it's cracked up to be... Blu-Ray... ugh... what a waste.
I saw a demo station in Best Buy of Blu-Ray and for one the DVD comparison on there was total ****, nothing like what a DVD really looks like, and aside from the high-def colors being really nice the picture on the Blu-Ray side was still visually compromised on the plasma they had the thing hooked up to... you could still see loads and loads of compression artifacts and pixelated images. Definitely not worth the upgrade as it stands right now.

Was that BluRay playing on a 720p TV? If so then its the same thing as the "watching DVD's on an old CRT" you said. The improvement difference between 720p and 1080p is bigger than difference between DVD (576p) and 720p content.
I have a HDDVD player and watching movies on a 720p isn't that impressive over DVD. When you see it at full 1080p it's completely different.

Quote - joeydoo said @ #11.3

Was that BluRay playing on a 720p TV? If so then its the same thing as the "watching DVD's on an old CRT" you said. The improvement difference between 720p and 1080p is bigger than DVD->720p content.
I have a HDDVD player and watching movies on a 720p isn't that impressive over DVD. When you see it at full 1080p it's completely different.

DVD is 480p anyway

Quote - Shiranui said @ #11.4

DVD is 480p anyway

What's you point? You are wrong anyway, DVD's are 576p in my country. ;)

I'll edit my post so you can understand.

Quote - joeydoo said @ #11.3

Was that BluRay playing on a 720p TV? If so then its the same thing as the "watching DVD's on an old CRT" you said. The improvement difference between 720p and 1080p is bigger than difference between DVD (576p) and 720p content.
I have a HDDVD player and watching movies on a 720p isn't that impressive over DVD. When you see it at full 1080p it's completely different.

It was playing on a 1080p Plasma. Wouldn't you think that the store display (for Samsung products, by the way) would have the best thing there for the demo, since it's trying to pump up Blu-Ray technology against DVD?

Quote - Hooya said @ #11.2

I saw a demo station in Best Buy of Blu-Ray and for one the DVD comparison on there was total ****, nothing like what a DVD really looks like

Yeah, I laughed too hard when I saw the comparison demo at Best Buy "This side of the image is dvd, this side is high def" the High def looked beautiful and the regular dvd looked like if you downloaded a video in Vivo format in 1998 and zoomed in 4x lol.

For those who haven't seen the Vivo codec in 1998, trust me, its horrible! It was used to compress full length movies into about 100-200 megs for dial-up users! It looked awful!

Quote - Ash said @ #11.7

Yeah, I laughed too hard when I saw the comparison demo at Best Buy "This side of the image is dvd, this side is high def" the High def looked beautiful and the regular dvd looked like if you downloaded a video in Vivo format in 1998 and zoomed in 4x lol.


I thought the same until I sat down and played with the demo disc at Circuit City. Not all of the clips are full Blu-Ray quality (1080p). Watch the clip about watches and that will change your mind. Waaaay better than DVD. Plus the popup menu is much better than the current DVD menu system ... its about time!

DVD Players Outnumber VCRs in US Homes

Yea, right. Now tell to all that ppl that dump their new DVD player/recorder and replace with HD-DVD or Blu Ray
lol
:p

I have never bought a dvd player yet, and never will, even though they cost almost nothing. I use my XBOX or laptop to play dvds.
I havent checked out prices of VCRs lately, but I remember when they were still a hell of a lot more expensive than a DVD player, seeing is that a DVD player doesn't do a whole lot other than play a simple dvd, unlesss you spend big money and buy a DVD Recorder.

What they should sell is a "subscription-free" DVR box.

I don't need a programme guide or favourites or self learning whatever. All I want to say is "channel 11, every thursday, 7PM to 8PM."

I don't want to pay $10 a month on top of $200 for the box for those extra features.

Sell it for $100, sans hard disc (slap a spare IDE drive in) and you've got a servicable product.

Quote - Hooya said @ #17.1
It's called Windows Media Center Edition.

Of course, you would want to build your own.

Well, there are two problems:

-Price: Even if you've got an entire spare machine, you've got the cost of the OS or equivalent third-party software (and I mean GOOD software, not some open-source thing that might work after more configuration than a full WinXP install), and most likely $50 or more on a sufficiently hardware-accelerated TV tuner (Media Centre does not support many of the cheapest TV cards, like the ones that are basically unchanged in design since 1998). Build from scratch, you'll probably be paying $200 or 300 for enough of a box to start with.

-Elegance. An ATX desktop case-- the typical HTPC enclosure-- is larger than many other items you'd put in the stereo cabinet-- and is apt to be (comparably) loud and hot-running. Even a SFF or Mini-ITX box is the same. An integrated, non-overkill box will do the job with less of that.

Umm they do have subscription free DVR boxes.

I have a Pioneer one thats has a 80gig HDD, and Burns dvds as well.

I don't pay any fees

I just set it to record (once or weekly/daily) and it does.

Its a tad over a year old but 2 things I don't like about it is its only 80gigs and it doesn't have any HD inputs. When I got it was wasn't thinking ahead cause I didn't think I would be gettign a HDTV for a loooong time so I didnt even think of getting one with HD inputs... opps big mistake!

my family primarily probably still uses VHS over DVD. We have a extra large collection of VHS tapes, and we can buy the movie's from second hand stores for cheap prices. Some second hand stores we know of will trade 2 for 1 VHS movies, so when we are finished watching 2 movies, we trade it in for a different one..

not to say though that i don't prefer the DVD technology. But if i run into a movie that I have not seen, and I am interested in seeing, and i can buy it for less than it would cost to rent, I would buy it.

People keep VCRs around because they have home movies on them, as well as their VHS collections. It's as simple as that. It doesn't mean that people are going out and still buying VHS cassettes. Once you have a DVD player, you stop buying VHS cassettes. The more important stat is when DVDs started to out-sell VHS, which was likely years ago. That tells more than how many households have each player. I still have a record player; it doesn't mean that I use it except once a blue moon.

your soooo right! ... cause for "most people" aint going to buy a VHS tape anymore (even if u can), cause there just overall worse than dvd image quality/sound quality , basically everything.... theres no "benifit" to using VHS over DVD unless (like u said) u got home videos etc that still aint on dvd etc.

for me personally only reason i still have a VHS myself is cause of the occasionally taping of stuff on tv... other than that i pretty much never use it.

i primarily use my XBox (XBox Media Center) to play pretty much ALL my movies/videos etc, since most of my movies are in the XviD format.... only reason i bought my dvd player (for the most part) was cause it could play SVCD's which alot of my first generation collection of movies where on SVCD ... but everything recent i just use XviD along with the XBox Media Center to play videos/movies etc.

plus i can fit like 3-6movies movies per dvd disc this way to ... so in other words is cheaper to backup movies this way then burn dvd's .... 3-6times cheaper

I still use a VCR simply because it provides modern day functionality to my 21 yr old Samsung Celebrity TV. My VCR gives me a tv tuner, composite input for gaming consoles and I can play VHS tapes

"It doesn’t take an Einstein to figure out that DVD player use has rocketed over 7 years."

I'm shocked.

Seriously, I don't find this "very interesting" at all, but perhaps someone do. :-/

The only VCR I still have is in the 13" TV. We never use it. I think we even threw out the VCR movies we still had. We're pretty picky when it comes to watching movies. If we can buy it on DVD then that's what we'll do even if we had it on tape. Dolby Surround is horrid compared to 5.1 (or 6.1) and the picture quality is pathetic nowadays.

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