Editorial

Editorial: Windows without Sinofsky

Recently, we posted an editorial called A World without Windows that took a look at the PC and mobile alternatives to Windows 8. Little did we know that the Windows division would soon have to deal with the fact that it would be without its leader for the past several years, Steven Sinofsky.

The rather abrupt and unexpected nature of Sinofsky's departure late on Monday, less than a month after the official launch of Windows 8, is now the stuff of rumors and speculations. The consensus is that Sinofsky could not get along with Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.

However, that doesn't really explain why Sinofsky was so quick to leave, rather than Microsoft choosing to perhaps ease in the transition by letting Sinofsky stay on until, say, the end of 2012.. Microsoft also made the announcement of Sinofsky leaving the company late on Monday evening, well after the normal news announcement cycle. That's usually a big clue that the decision was done very quickly and was not part of a planned smooth exit.

So the big question for Microsoft is, "Now what?" The company has already revealed that well known Windows team member Julie Larson-Green will take on most of Sinofsky's duties. We do know, based on previous interviews, that Larson-Green believes the touch screen UI is the way to go for the Windows user interface and that's not likely to change anytime soon.

Larson-Green will likely follow much of what Sinofsky had likely planned out for the future of Windows for the next few months, as well as for future hardware products. However, it should not be long before she puts her own ideas for the future of Windows into development that could differ from what Sinofsky had planned. Windows 9 is likely still very early in development and Larson-Green has plenty of time to make the OS her own, much like Sinofsky did with Windows 7 and Windows 8.

You can bet that the "Modern" touch screen UI will be improved for Windows 9 under Larson-Greeen. The big question: Will she decide to ditch the more open desktop UI for Windows 9 or continue to offer it for developers who don't want to bother with the new touch screen interface? Our guess is that the desktop will be done away with for the next version of Windows if Windows 8 is a success. If it is not, the desktop may be sticking around for a while longer.

Larson-Greene will also likely lead the Windows division in making more hardware products, including the rumored gaming-themed Xbox Surface tablet and Microsoft's own home grown Windows Phone. Again, some of these plans were likely started by Sinofsky but now they will have Larson-Greene's own touches.

And what about Microsoft as a whole? Ballmer is still running things and there's no indication he plans to leave anytime soon. Any bets that were made on Sinofsky becoming the new CEO are out the window. Ballmer is well and truly in charge of Microsoft and, barring a health scare, it would seem that will be the case for a long time. That could be both good or bad news, depending on how you feel Ballmer has lead Microsoft so far.

And finally, what about Sinofsky? It's a safe bet that his contract with Microsoft has some non-compete clauses and that likely means he won't be joining, for example, Apple or Google in the near future. We suspect that Sinofsky will take some time off before making the next move in his career. You can bet a lot of companies, both inside and outside the technology industry, would be eager to snap him up. Or, he could launch his own startup with his well earned Microsoft salary and stock options.

Our fantasy scenario? After taking a year off, Sinofsky joins Valve and helps to launch their Steam game console system. Yes, Valve co-founder Gabe Newell predicted that Windows 8 would be a "catastrophe" for the PC industry, but both he and Sinofsky are now former Microsoft employees who worked on versions of Windows. They might have more in common than even they might think.

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I am a complete PC numpty here but would like to point out that in the field of "serious" sound recording there is a vastly bigger than semantic difference between "turning off" and "not having to use".
ANY program not swithed off can cause clickS, dropouts and freezes to an audio stream and also increases latency.
This is one reason why Blista was such a disaster for audio work and many users would like an even leaner Win 7 (which, btw audio peeps almost all use the 64 bit version of because lots of ram is very important.)

Dave Northampton uk

Step 1: Microsoft Exec leaves company
Step 2: John Callaham writes an "editorial" that basically says nothing less than 24 hours after the fact
Step 3: Profit

It's all about page views, baby!

You can bet that the "Modern" touch screen UI will be improved for Windows 9 under Larson-Greeen. The big question: Will she decide to ditch the more open desktop UI for Windows 9 or continue to offer it for developers who don't want to bother with the new touch screen interface? Our guess is that the desktop will be done away with for the next version of Windows if Windows 8 is a success. If it is not, the desktop may be sticking around for a while longer.

The desktop will NEVER be done away with.

You like to write this crap, how about a nice little bet of $50,000 that you are completely wrong?

You want your readers to 'trust' your insight and understanding of Microsoft and Windows, yet I don't think if you had any risk you would make such insane grandiose claims.

Hopefully with Sinofsky gone, Microsoft will not be so pig-headed with the religion-esque pushing of Metro. Keep it at the forefront for the mobile form-factor, hell keep it as a extra for the desktop.

Just stop trying to slap people in the face with a UI they have absolutely no need for, and wake up to the fact that a full-screen popup is not a good replacement.

I don't care what the replacement is. Just so long as it's not full-screen, and doesn't try and force me into an unwanted UI. Is that so much to ask?

The person who head user interface design and research for Windows 8, now runs the Windows division. Somehow, I sincerely doubt she's going to back pedal on her own work.

~Johnny said,
The person who head user interface design and research for Windows 8, now runs the Windows division. Somehow, I sincerely doubt she's going to back pedal on her own work.

You imply that they would have to junk Metro entirely to achieve a reasonable balance that doesn't slap the user around between two disparate UIs. That is simply not the case.

You wouldn't want to be suddenly dumped onto the desktop because you tapped into a particular settings menu, so why should it not be the same in reverse?

Athernar said,

You imply that they would have to junk Metro entirely to achieve a reasonable balance that doesn't slap the user around between two disparate UIs. That is simply not the case.

You wouldn't want to be suddenly dumped onto the desktop because you tapped into a particular settings menu, so why should it not be the same in reverse?

I'm implying that the person who most likely made that choice in the first place, is now in charge of everything Windows, and so is unlikely to want to change it - because it's already following their vision. If anything, she's likely to push Metro more going forward.

~Johnny said,

I'm implying that the person who most likely made that choice in the first place, is now in charge of everything Windows, and so is unlikely to want to change it - because it's already following their vision. If anything, she's likely to push Metro more going forward.

Who said anything about changing Metro? This isn't about getting rid of it, this is about making a clear divide between the two UIs for the benefit of both.

Again, you wouldn't want to be suddenly dumped onto the desktop because you tapped into a particular settings menu, so why should it not be the same in reverse?

The Desktop isn't going anywhere... Windows' main benefit is the vast amount of software available for it. It would be completely foolish (Particularly when targeting the corporate environment) to scrap all of that.

Well I'm not surprised that they fired Sinofsky after the Windows 8/Metro debacle. But I think they should have booted all of the people involved with the interface design. From the sound of it, Larson-Gree isn't going to make things better... unless she was just following orders with her Windows 8 involvement.

Chugworth said,
Well I'm not surprised that they fired Sinofsky after the Windows 8/Metro debacle. But I think they should have booted all of the people involved with the interface design. From the sound of it, Larson-Gree isn't going to make things better... unless she was just following orders with her Windows 8 involvement.

So he was fired?

For Windows 8?

And Larson Gree isn't going to do anything differently?


Man, thank god for your comment - I would of got none of that without your factual post

Over 1.5 billion Windows PC... remind me how many have a touch-screen ?? so yeah Windows 8 UI is a screw-up. So wave goodbye...

I don't mind a tablet OS for tablet but to force a touch screen concept on a desktop PC is quite astonishing lack of common sense. I am working IT and I already know Windows 8 will go the way of Vista in the Enterprise. No way we will deploy it.

One thing is for sure, Metro isn't going away, nor does it need to.

1) Microsoft simply CANNOT abandon WinRT apps, and their developers. They invested a **** ton of time and energy getting them on board for Windows 8, and to simply up and abandon them by going back to Windows 7 for whatever silly reason, would just be suicide. You're never going to have these apps on the desktop. Never. And if you abandon developers, good luck getting them back in the future. (HINT: You won't). Windows needs these developers. Windows 8 has brought back developer interest in the platform.

2) Going back to the desktop only UI would kill Microsoft's chances of spreading Windows out to other devices, and kill the unity it worked so hard to create. It's about damn time we have a unified OS, and I'm pretty sure I would abandon Windows if it went backwards to chaotic days of old.

Edited by Dot Matrix, Nov 13 2012, 1:35pm :

Dot Matrix said,
One thing is for sure, Metro isn't going away, nor does it need to.

1) Microsoft simply CANNOT abandon WinRT apps, and their developers. They invested a **** ton of time and energy getting them on board for Windows 8,

Zune and Aero Interface disagree with you.

Brony said,

Zune and Aero Interface disagree with you.

What does that have to do with Windows 8? There's just too much invested in it to abandon it. It would be suicide for them if they did, because the developers would leave, and never come back. And the consumer's eye would go elsewhere.

MS has no option but to support both the desktop and Modern UI whether it is in one OS or two separate ones. If MS goes to an OS that is only Modern UI, companies will stay on Windows 7. There's a TON of legacy applications still being used and not enough resources for companies to completely rewrite/redesign them for the Modern UI.

I hope she's brave enough to change the metro part on desktop computers. It has a great potential, but needs better multitasking (more than 2 apps on screen, etc), and more customizable start screen (see WP8 home screen). Also, desktop needs better integration with metro (share button in the charms bar, integration with toast notifications...). I the current state, metro is not a finished product, more like alpha release. Oh and btw, Julie, those fugly scrollbars have to go the way of the dodo!

She, AND Sinofsky - they both worked at office and Windows in same time. I don't know her, but with Sinofsky I've got few words few years go. If he has something in his head is impossible to convince him he's wrong. And yes, someone mentioned here - it was stick to the plans, and terms I have to add.

Enron said,
She's cute. I hope she makes Windows cuter too, like maybe have kittens.jpg as the default wallpaper.

Like someone said, Men are CGA (16 colors), Women are VGA (16 million colors).

Julie Larson Green destroyed Office with Ribbon and Windows with Metro. She's not the right choice at all. There can be improvement and change brought about without destroying everything that works. That's how Windows evolved and that's what most people want.

Simply by getting the Ribbon out there, I think she's one of the most intelligent UI designers

Edited by ~Johnny, Nov 13 2012, 4:30pm :

~Johnny said,
Simply by making the Ribbon, I think she's one of the most intelligent UI designers out there

JLG gets most of the credit for the Ribbon but really it was a whole group together, she just ran it etc. If anything the hope is that she can bring the other divisions closer together so we can get better integration going forward.

But in that sense I think she's just temporary, she wasn't given the president of windows title that Sinofsky had which leads me to believe someone else will be put in charge of the division in time. Ballmer probably wants the next big update "blue" to get done first before someone new takes control from Windows 9?

MsftGaurav said,
Julie Larson Green destroyed Office with Ribbon and Windows with Metro. She's not the right choice at all. There can be improvement and change brought about without destroying everything that works. That's how Windows evolved and that's what most people want.

I love the ribbon, everything makes sense on it. Everything feels like it's where it should be. Even though I had to do a course in Office 2003, I still find myself hunting for confusing menus and options.

Our guess is that the desktop will be done away with for the next version of Windows if Windows 8 is a success. If it is not, the desktop may be sticking around for a while longer.
You don't say.

Whether Windows 8 is a success or not, the Desktop will not be going anywhere in Windows 9. De-emphasised possibly, but Microsoft love their backwards compatibility too much to get rid of the Desktop.

Jazirian said,
Whether Windows 8 is a success or not, the Desktop will not be going anywhere in Windows 9. De-emphasised possibly, but Microsoft love their backwards compatibility too much to get rid of the Desktop.

Agreed. Statements to the contrary are just ridiculous.

Our guess is that the desktop will be done away with for the next version of Windows if Windows 8 is a success.

Honestly, I don't know where views like this even come from. Microsoft have been pretty firm about their stance on the desktop and it's worth, and at no point have they ever alluded to getting rid of it. The desktop brings the raw power, and Metro brings accessibility, and Microsoft appreciate and know that. They like the desktop, they use the desktop. But the desktop has a more specific purpose going forward in their eyes - and not a purpose that will in anyway easily be replaced by the Immersive UI, either now or going forward. Killing off the desktop would literally be like killing off Windows in the productivity sector.


Our guess is that the desktop will be done away with for the next version of Windows if Windows 8 is a success.

I actually feel ashamed to read such a poor argument in an Editorial. There's no prior rationalizing of the argument and things like this only play against Neowin's reputation.

~Johnny said,

Honestly, I don't know where views like this even come from. Microsoft have been pretty firm about their stance on the desktop and it's worth, and at no point have they ever alluded to getting rid of it. The desktop brings the raw power, and Metro brings accessibility, and Microsoft appreciate and know that. They like the desktop, they use the desktop. But the desktop has a more specific purpose going forward in their eyes - and not a purpose that will in anyway easily be replaced by the Immersive UI, either now or going forward. Killing off the desktop would literally be like killing off Windows in the productivity sector.

The day, desktop is replaced by Metro UI completely, Microsoft will loose their corporate business. No employer would want you to play Bad Piggies and be forced to use full screen. Unless they have their own custom apps specifically created for Metro UI. So desktop is not going anywhere at least for next 2 versions of windows.

I myself find Metro to be very boring and current apps are pathetic. Shame to call them apps.

Neowin's prediction of Desktop being removed is totally a wild one.

sanke1 said,

The day, desktop is replaced by Metro UI completely, Microsoft will loose their corporate business. No employer would want you to play Bad Piggies and be forced to use full screen. Unless they have their own custom apps specifically created for Metro UI. So desktop is not going anywhere at least for next 2 versions of windows.

I myself find Metro to be very boring and current apps are pathetic. Shame to call them apps.

Neowin's prediction of Desktop being removed is totally a wild one.

Absolutely. Corporations are just NOT going to be using Metro Apps. Let's all get serious here. LOL

Our guess is that the desktop will be done away with for the next version of Windows if Windows 8 is a success.

I have little issue with the direction Microsoft has taken with Windows 8, and I understand and appreciate the compromises, but if they completely remove the desktop, they're just putting a gun to their heads and pulling the trigger.

IronChef75 said,

I have little issue with the direction Microsoft has taken with Windows 8, and I understand and appreciate the compromises, but if they completely remove the desktop, they're just putting a gun to their heads and pulling the trigger.

I don't see the desktop going away either, WinRT can't match or replace Win32 yet API wise and the limits to the new UI also hold back the bigger apps from being done at this point. I think and expect that Windows 9 will give us a tighter merging of the new UI with the desktop. People want to be able to run the new metro apps on the desktop windowed, and also better multi-monitor support for metro apps and the start screen itself.

The next logical step is to just bring the two UIs closer together so that going from one to the other is more natural and less of a split.

GP007 said,

I don't see the desktop going away either, WinRT can't match or replace Win32 yet API wise and the limits to the new UI also hold back the bigger apps from being done at this point. I think and expect that Windows 9 will give us a tighter merging of the new UI with the desktop. People want to be able to run the new metro apps on the desktop windowed, and also better multi-monitor support for metro apps and the start screen itself.

The next logical step is to just bring the two UIs closer together so that going from one to the other is more natural and less of a split.

Agreed. And MAYBE more mouse friendly. Some of those gestures are just not productive on a mouse. And there is NO reason why the Metro apps can't have a Close Btn. lol Dragging those apps to close with a mouse is easily my least favorite thing since Ke$ha...

From what other sites have stated he was not a nice person to get along with. I am wondering if he was against change. He is the one who killed off live mesh c,combined it with skydrive while getting rid of features that everbody used.

Maybe he was the one who got rid of the start menu on the desktop part of windows 8 like he did with live mesh ?

Not that he was against change per sé, but he was very much set to sticking to the plan. Once it was made, it's full force ahead to try and get everyone working on the same page, and people working separately from that, taking away resources or competing against his plan were likely to just get rolled over.

In one way it's a good way of actually getting things done, and it's probably something Microsoft needed to get 7 & 8 out the door, but it also cost them dearly in some unique areas of innovation and connectivity.

I don't really think the lack of a Start Menu is that important. The Modern UI takes care of that pretty easily. The biggest, most annoying problem in Windows 8 is that once you're in the desktop you don't want to deal with touch-screen UI, like sensitive corners and poor, featureless metro apps... You should be able to turn the touch UI off or on.
That's the so called "improvement" of Windows 8 we will see in the future, because the desktop won't die, even if Windows 8 becomes a huge success (which I doubt it will).

Luis Mazza said,
I don't really think the lack of a Start Menu is that important. The Modern UI takes care of that pretty easily. The biggest, most annoying problem in Windows 8 is that once you're in the desktop you don't want to deal with touch-screen UI, like sensitive corners and poor, featureless metro apps... You should be able to turn the touch UI off or on.
That's the so called "improvement" of Windows 8 we will see in the future, because the desktop won't die, even if Windows 8 becomes a huge success (which I doubt it will).

That's not the case at all, with me. What you refer to as "the touch UI" is just "the new UI" to me; it's a UI that can be used just as easily with a mouse and keyboard as it can with touch, and as the "Desktop" is now just an app within the new experience, I'd rather those new features not cease to work when I'm using the Desktop. When I'm using the Desktop, I still like to have a "Metro" app snapped to the side, often, and I still like to use the Search charm as well as other features (e.g. the task switcher).

Calum said,

That's not the case at all, with me..

There's a little word that you're ignoring, and it is called CHOICE.
You like it the way it is, but seems that a lot (if not most people) don't. And there's no choice. And please, don't point me to 3rd party apps to fix that.

Luis Mazza said,

There's a little word that you're ignoring, and it is called CHOICE.
You like it the way it is, but seems that a lot (if not most people) don't. And there's no choice. And please, don't point me to 3rd party apps to fix that.

Choice? There's choice in Windows 8. Pin your desktop apps to the Start Screen, unpin the Metro ones, and - boom - you have your Start Menu back. But the reason you cannot turn those of is, they're an integral part of the OS. This is the new Windows. This is the direction Microsoft wants to go. They're done with the Windows 9x line. It's not coming back.

Edited by Dot Matrix, Nov 13 2012, 1:04pm :

Dot Matrix said,

Choice? There's choice in Windows 8. Pin your desktop apps to the Start Screen, unpin the Metro ones, and - boom - you have your Start Menu back.

I'm not talking about the Start Menu settings. You should not only read, but also comprehend what you're reading.
Also, I don't recall calling tech support for what I already know.

Luis Mazza said,

There's a little word that you're ignoring, and it is called CHOICE.
You like it the way it is, but seems that a lot (if not most people) don't. And there's no choice. And please, don't point me to 3rd party apps to fix that.

You have a choice. Don't buy the product being offered.

TCLN Ryster said,

You have a choice. Don't buy the product being offered.

Absolutely. Many have opted for not buying it... I'm sure Microsoft won't mind, won't they? They made it for you and a bunch of remote-controlled fanboys anyway.

Luis Mazza said,

There's a little word that you're ignoring, and it is called CHOICE.
You like it the way it is, but seems that a lot (if not most people) don't. And there's no choice. And please, don't point me to 3rd party apps to fix that.

It's more like those that are saying that it's all about *choice* want to actually take away the choice that is present in Windows 8 (not WindowsRT) - instead of being either/or (which is what Windows 8 is today) they want a Win32-only OS with the Windows 7 desktop and start menu (basically Windows 7 SP2) and a completely-separate WindowsRT to square off against Android.

GP007 - how does the WinRT API roadblock the Win32 API? Unless an application was written specifically to run on Windows 7 (such an application will throw up an exception when Windows 8 is detected), Win32 applications from as far back as Windows XP (or even Windows 2000 in some cases) will run quite happily on Windows 8 today - without even going near the Compatibility Settings. Application creates a group by default? Not a problem - the group will show in the Start Screen. (PowerDVD 12 and Nero 12 do this today.) It's still about choice, as even Windows 8 users can still opt to run Win32 applications instead of WinRT apps (where both are available) - I've pointed out that I have both the Win32 and WinRT versions of the Kindle e-reader installed, and prefer the Win32 version; on the other hand, Win32-based HootSuite was replaced with WinRT-based MetroTwit. (Speaking of which, MetroTwit got a HARD workout Election Night, and it kept right on keeping on, well past the point where HootSuite would have thrown up.)

PGHammer said,

It's more like those that are saying that it's all about *choice* want to actually take away the choice that is present in Windows 8 (not WindowsRT) - instead of being either/or (which is what Windows 8 is today) they want a Win32-only OS with the Windows 7 desktop and start menu (basically Windows 7 SP2) and a completely-separate WindowsRT to square off against Android.

GP007 - how does the WinRT API roadblock the Win32 API? Unless an application was written specifically to run on Windows 7 (such an application will throw up an exception when Windows 8 is detected), Win32 applications from as far back as Windows XP (or even Windows 2000 in some cases) will run quite happily on Windows 8 today - without even going near the Compatibility Settings. Application creates a group by default? Not a problem - the group will show in the Start Screen. (PowerDVD 12 and Nero 12 do this today.) It's still about choice, as even Windows 8 users can still opt to run Win32 applications instead of WinRT apps (where both are available) - I've pointed out that I have both the Win32 and WinRT versions of the Kindle e-reader installed, and prefer the Win32 version; on the other hand, Win32-based HootSuite was replaced with WinRT-based MetroTwit. (Speaking of which, MetroTwit got a HARD workout Election Night, and it kept right on keeping on, well past the point where HootSuite would have thrown up.)

Such a poor argument... NEXT

Ok, how did this topic get derailed quickly into a start button conversation? This topic has been done to death. The degradation of the main topic to the start button is quite amusing.

How about discussing the impact of Sinofsky leaving or why he left? He didn't get ousted for lack of a start button...lol.

Luis Mazza said,

There's a little word that you're ignoring, and it is called CHOICE.
You like it the way it is, but seems that a lot (if not most people) don't. And there's no choice. And please, don't point me to 3rd party apps to fix that.


But why provide the choice to turn all of the new stuff off when people don't have to use it? When you're in the Desktop mode, you don't have to use any of what you mentioned you'd like turned off, do you?

Calum said,

But why provide the choice to turn all of the new stuff off when people don't have to use it? When you're in the Desktop mode, you don't have to use any of what you mentioned you'd like turned off, do you?

I don't want to loose the corners of the screen with invasive charm bar and preview pics of whatever metro thing is being pushed. I don't want to use metro apps. I don't want to know they even exist when I'm on the desktop. Can you turn this off?
If you enable screen saver while you rest the mouse on one of the screen corners, it becomes irritating. BUT... I can turn it off if I want to.

PGHammer said,

It's more like those that are saying that it's all about *choice* want to actually take away the choice that is present in Windows 8 (not WindowsRT) - instead of being either/or (which is what Windows 8 is today) they want a Win32-only OS with the Windows 7 desktop and start menu (basically Windows 7 SP2) and a completely-separate WindowsRT to square off against Android.
[. . .]

Very well said That's exactly what it's like. Right now, everyone has the choice to just use the "Desktop" if they'd like, and they don't have to use any of the new stuff, if they don't wish to. They wouldn't even have to use the Start screen if they really didn't want to because they can pin apps to the Taskbar or create shortcuts on their Desktop.

Luis Mazza said,

I don't want to loose the corners of the screen with invasive charm bar and preview pics of whatever metro thing is being pushed. I don't want to use metro apps. I don't want to know they even exist when I'm on the desktop. Can you turn this off?
If you enable screen saver while you rest the mouse on one of the screen corners, it becomes irritating. BUT... I can turn it off if I want to.


What I'm saying, though, is that you don't have to put your mouse into the very far corners, thus activating the new stuff. Is there a reason you're putting your mouse into the corners when you're on the Desktop? You don't have to know this new stuff or the new apps exist, if you just use the "Desktop" in the same way you used Windows 7 (minus the Start Menu, which isn't needed, due to you being able to access your apps from elsewhere on the Desktop).

Calum said,

What I'm saying, though, is that you don't have to put your mouse into the very far corners, thus activating the new stuff. Is there a reason you're putting your mouse into the corners when you're on the Desktop? You don't have to know this new stuff or the new apps exist, if you just use the "Desktop" in the same way you used Windows 7 (minus the Start Menu, which isn't needed, due to you being able to access your apps from elsewhere on the Desktop).

I'm holding it wrong, you mean? For more than 20 years???

ROFTL

Really?

Luis Mazza said,

I'm holding it wrong, you mean? For more than 20 years???

ROFTL

Really?


You complained that you're seeing the new stuff when you put your mouse to the corners, so you'd like it turned off. But it seems to make no sense to me for anyone to put their mouse to the corners, unless they'd like to access the new stuff, so I asked you a polite question as to why you're doing so, to find out whether there are actually any other uses (although it's clear to me that there aren't).

Calum said,

You complained that you're seeing the new stuff when you put your mouse to the corners, so you'd like it turned off. But it seems to make no sense to me for anyone to put their mouse to the corners, unless they'd like to access the new stuff, so I asked you a polite question as to why you're doing so, to find out whether there are actually any other uses (although it's clear to me that there aren't).

You see... I don't actually care. I already chose my OS. Let's see what Windows users think, shall we? I'm not getting any money for this... nor you, I guess.

Luis Mazza said,

You see... I don't actually care. I already chose my OS. Let's see what Windows users think, shall we? I'm not getting any money for this... nor you, I guess.


So are you admitting that you don't have to use any of the new stuff then?

Calum said,

So are you admitting that you don't have to use any of the new stuff then?

No. I admit it is not my favorite OS 98% of the time I'm using a desktop OS.