EFF uses a Badger to protect your privacy

Everyone knows that Internet users have been losing their privacy little by little, and there's no sign of it slowing down anytime soon. Luckily there are organizations, such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) that continuously try to fight against the ubiquitous monitoring of everyone's online activities.

The latest is a tool called Privacy Badger, a privacy extension for both Chrome and Firefox. The tool analyzes sites and determines if you're being tracked without your permission. If you are, Privacy Badger will automatically block the cookies that are tracking you. If the data is important for the site, EFF claims that the badger will simply block out the tracking cookies. Advertisers can apply to whitelist themselves by following Do Not Track requests, and the hope is that organizations will begin to the do the right thing instead of having their traffic blocked.

The tool is still in alpha, so might not be completely ready for primetime. In the Neowin forums, user primexx reports that there are other ways to achieve a similar result, and that the Privacy Badger isn't really playing well with those other tools right now. Regardless, it's good to have options and even better to see that some organizations are putting up a good fight to try and battle against the constant surveillance of the Internet.

Source and image via EFF | Thanks to MeetJohnDoe for the tip!

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16 Comments

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I understand it blocks the cookie but still serves the ad? If that is correct, this extension stinks. If not, this blog needs to be better written.

babyHacker said,
I understand it blocks the cookie but still serves the ad? If that is correct, this extension stinks. If not, this blog needs to be better written.

You do realize that a lot of content on the Internet is free (like Neowin) due mostly to displaying ads, right?

I want a version based on the Honey Badger, where it doesn't just block the tracking cookies, but it tracks down the senders server and eats it. That'll teach them not to track anyone.

Browsing feels more snappy after installing this addon on Firefox. Anybody else have a similar experience?

Big deal... The "do not track" setting in the browser is anyway just a f**** RECOMMENDATION to be obeyed on the host of the website. Its not enforced, there is no law if the host does not obey its CxO / board of directors will be executed in public etc. etc. Its just a friendly recommendation. Nothing more. An illusion -as George Carlin said- that you have choice. You have security. Thats all what you can expect from this industry in 2014. Better to be aware of this.

We have a law that stands behind tracking protection.

Tracking dutch people with cookies and such that are NOT required for the website's operation, without the visitors consent, is illegal.
Almost every website I go to nowadays (neowin being one of the exceptions) gives me the notice bar "Do you like Cookies, well accept them or get out". Very few websites have a version without any external cookies.

So yeah, there are laws behind it and soon a whole EU backing the do-not-track.

Currently this bill is being considered to put in effect througout the EU.

If companies like Microsoft didn't derail the whole "Do not track" process for selfish and punitive reasons, the advertising industry would have complied by now. Instead, now we need things like this because everybody ignores it.