Elop reaffirms Nokia commitment to Windows Phone

Stephen Elop, chief executive officer of Nokia, has reaffirmed the company's commitment to Microsoft's Windows Phone mobile operating system. Elop also stated Nokia would release Windows Phone 8 devices in the "near term," while neither confirming nor denying a rumored September announcement.

According to Reuters, Elop stuck to his company's commitment to Windows Phone when questioned by reporters, saying Nokia is clearly on Microsoft's side despite his company's recent financial troubles.

"I don't think about rewinding the clock and thinking about competing elsewhere," Elop said to reporters in Oslo following a meeting with business partners.  "In today's war ... (between) Android, Apple and Windows, we are very clear, we are fighting that with the Windows phone."

Elop's statements come following news that the company continued to lose money last quarter, when it posted an operating loss of more than a billion dollars. The company's stock has been trading at all-time low levels in recent months, and a former executive has criticized the CEO while some stockholders have called for Elop's exit.

Nokia is rumored to be revealing its first Windows Phone 8 device early next month at its annual Nokia World event next month. Recent leaked images have indicated the company is currently working on a prototype device in advance of the launch. Nokia's first Windows Phone 8 devices are rumored to launch alongside the operating system sometime in October.

Via: CNET News
Source: Reuters

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23 Comments

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"In today's war ... (between) Android, Apple and Windows, we are very clear, we are fighting that with the Windows phone."

Fighting in a platform war, huh? You competitor is not Android or iOS, it's the rest of the OEMs.

If WP8 turns out to be profitable you can bet Samsung will come and try to eat your lunch. If they succeed MS will have a new best friend and no one will care about Nokia (other than those that wanted a Maemo phone).

Go ask Sendo how it feels being a platform martyr.

It seems to me that Elop is so focused on cheering WP that he sometimes forgets about what's good PR for Nokia (the "burning platform" speech being a prime example).

And before anyone says "should have gone android" take a quick peek at htc's recent financial statements, android isnt stopping them posting record losses. With Windows Phone Nokia has already positioned themselves as the go to brand and if WP8 really is as good as it looks (topped with a PureView model) they will be well postitioned to dominate WP sales and continue their recovery.

efjay said,
And before anyone says "should have gone android" take a quick peek at htc's recent financial statements, android isnt stopping them posting record losses. With Windows Phone Nokia has already positioned themselves as the go to brand and if WP8 really is as good as it looks (topped with a PureView model) they will be well postitioned to dominate WP sales and continue their recovery.

I'd also like to add that Nokias stock has been going up since they reported Q2 numbers.

Looks like windows phone 8 is going to be pretty successful... developers are already jumping on aboard. Mint is finally coming to windows phone but only for windows phone 8.

Good news. My Lumia 800 got me hooked on Nokia once more. Such a good device. Too bad about the battery though. Look forward to WP8!

Mortis said,
Great! He will remain in history as the one who sank Nokia.

You mean him, along with long-time Nokia executives that have been sitting on the board as well?

Do not predict the future, or you may have to eat your own words later on.

Mortis said,
Great! He will remain in history as the one who sank Nokia.

Mortis said,
Great! He will remain in history as the one who sank Nokia.

Oh boy another I read it on the internetz so it must be true. Due diligence will get you a lot further in life than being a ill-informed parrot.

Stephen walked into a big MESS. He had to make a decision to pull NOKIA out of the doldrums and into the smartphone world or not take the job. They rested on their laurels for many years before ELOP and failed to evolve and take control of their position. ELOP hasn't failed Nokia yet. He has made many strategic decisions to trim the fat and get them leaner. Hard decisions often at times are not met with praise. The losses are slowing down thanks to ELOP and his decisions as of late. Choosing android would have not given instant success. They would have been another "me too" company in a sea of "me too" companies with the Android offerings. WP was the right play for long term penetration into the Mobile OS market. They might find the instant success as iPhone has but then again that segment was unchallenged back then. If Nokia can step up the game and use their engineering genius that they have displayed in the past then there is a great chance they will succeed. The display will be my only concern. Form factors aside that display has to be at or near the Retina display or the consumers will not move off the iPhone. The WP 8 OS is showing great signs of promise and if the displays and hardware can match the smoothness and the simplicity of WP8 then MS, Nokia and others will have a big hit on their hands. I will say it again that the display resolution has to be high on the next devices or I will not come back to the fold again. I already have a Lumia 800 and the pentile text can be a drag. Otherwise the phone is awesome.

MDboyz said,
Do not predict the future, or you may have to eat your own words later on.

Funny that MS fanboys been saying this for years about their Windows Phone and still yet to eat their words.

Nokia WP8 phones need to be a big success or Elop time as Nokia CEO will probably come to an end.

LaP said,
Nokia WP8 phones need to be a big success or Elop time as Nokia CEO will probably come to an end.

It is unfortunate that people are so short sighted honestly. The article fails to mention that their losses are SLOWING. What could that possibly be an indicator of I wonder? lol

Make no mistake, Nokia is turning things around and this will prove to have been the right decision.

M_Lyons10 said,

It is unfortunate that people are so short sighted honestly. The article fails to mention that their losses are SLOWING. What could that possibly be an indicator of I wonder? lol

Make no mistake, Nokia is turning things around and this will prove to have been the right decision.

But aren't their losses slowing because they're forced to cut other products / services (i.e. they are cutting QT, OS production, research and factories)? Sounds like they are putting their eggs into one basket with no fall back. Kinda scary considering the vast range of Nokia products and services that once existed.

M_Lyons10 said,

It is unfortunate that people are so short sighted honestly. The article fails to mention that their losses are SLOWING. What could that possibly be an indicator of I wonder? lol

Make no mistake, Nokia is turning things around and this will prove to have been the right decision.


I heard this before they launch the WP7. LOL

M_Lyons10 said,

It is unfortunate that people are so short sighted honestly. The article fails to mention that their losses are SLOWING. What could that possibly be an indicator of I wonder? lol

Make no mistake, Nokia is turning things around and this will prove to have been the right decision.


Nokia posted an operating loss of $1.02 in Q2 2012, compared to an operating loss of $692 million in Q2 2011. I can't mention operating losses are slowing when they're not, in fact, slowing. I believe you mean Nokia posted a loss that was less than what analysts were expecting.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
He means Q-to-Q I'm assuming.

Comparing data from consecutive quarters doesn't necessarily indicate a trend because of traditional shopping patterns. Comparing a company's Christmas quarter to their quarter directly following it wouldn't make much sense, for instance. (Also: oops, my last comment was supposed to say $1.02 billion, not just $1.02 )

Anthony Tosie said,

Comparing data from consecutive quarters doesn't necessarily indicate a trend because of traditional shopping patterns. Comparing a company's Christmas quarter to their quarter directly following it wouldn't make much sense, for instance. (Also: oops, my last comment was supposed to say $1.02 billion, not just $1.02 )

I know all of that, I was just stating what I think he meant by his comment, although according to Bloomberg and other analysts they seem to be making a comeback from the hole they were in couple of quarters ago. Not a big comeback but slowly but steadily.