EU Probes US Online Gambling Laws

The European Union launched an investigation today into U.S. laws on Internet gambling, after European betting companies complained that Washington's actions against them were infringing world trade rules. Online gambling is a growing business, worth potentially $15.5 billion this year alone, and although the US has banned the practice, many European sites want a piece of the American market. The sites claim that the ban, which stops American banks and credit card companies from processing payments to online gambling companies outside the country, discriminates against them while allowing domestic gambling companies, especially those on horse races, to flourish.

"The U.S. has the right to address legitimate public policy concerns relating to Internet gambling, but discrimination against EU companies cannot be part of the policy mix," said EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson, who stated he hoped the issue could be resolved amicably. Officials at the U.S. mission to the EU declined to comment, directing inquiries to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative in Washington.

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(brandnewfantx said @ #6)
EU should stop ****ing around with people... Now they are poking the bear, and this time it will fight back unlike microsoft.

Someone have no clue what is happening with MS eh? MS is fighting back like heck but it isn't helping them much

(naap51stang said @ #7)
Hey, if you want to gamble, that is your business......but, the laws in the USA are what they are. Don't like them?
Get em changed.

What laws make gambling illegal? I don't think such a law is Constitutional to begin with.

(jwjw1 said @ #8.1)
i didn't know the EU was a gambling organization..guess it does fall inline with the 'parasite'....lol
Aw, bless you. I bet you really thought you had me with that one too. Curses.

... after European betting companies complained that Washington's actions against them were infringing world trade rule ...

In short, *never mind* that it is also illegal for US-based companies to set up online gaming sites aimed at US citizens that involve wagering real money; how is this discriminatory against the EU or its member nations? (The same statutes that cover this activity also cover bookmaking and even office pools conducted via computer, and are part of the anti-wire-fraud statutes. So, US-based companies can't do it, either; therefore, it cannot be discriminatory.) If you want to place a wager, then you *must* do so in person, and you also must do so where permitted by law. (Even in the few states that permit wagers on out-of-state horse races or other events, the compact is with specific states, and is based on reciprocity with the other state involved. Example: the OTB parlors in New York State.) So, what's the *real* issue here?

You goto work and maybe work hard.

Then you hand over your money in a game of chance, knowing that the bookie is the only winner.

Thats why you should not gamble.

Actually it's a person's choice if they want to or not. You don't get to decide for everyone. And when people do decide to gamble they know the odds are not in their favour, that's the nature of the game.

(C_Guy said @ #11.1)
Actually it's a person's choice if they want to or not. You don't get to decide for everyone. And when people do decide to gamble they know the odds are not in their favour, that's the nature of the game.


Like gha! I know that.

If people wish to chuck their money down the toilet of course thats is their choice.

However, I have seen a lot of broken homes and debts created by gambling.

I thought maybe my comment might make the younger man or woman think about it.

Being as I am an old man thats circumnavigated the block a few times.

(leesmithg said @ #11)
You goto work and maybe work hard.
Then you hand over your money in a game of chance, knowing that the bookie is the only winner.

Yes, bookie is a winner, but there are some people who can predict results quite successfully and can make living out of it. Bookies take 5-20% percent from gambling fund. But Lottery is a real rip-off. Why? Because usually they take twice as much from fund - 40-60% and there is no way to predict results because they are completely random. Lottery makes a looser out of everyone. There is a good saying that "Lottery is a tax for people who don't know mathematics." unlike some forms of gambling where some people still can win because results are much more predictable.

Isn't it odd how the EU spends so much time worrying about American and not their own issues? Let America worry about America and try to find something meaningful to do with your day. Think up ways to spend Microsoft's money. They earned it, you stole it, so find a way to spend it. I KNOW! Use it to fund more ground-less lawsuits against successful American companies! Come on, take them down a peg! Success in business is a wonderful accomplishment.... unless you're American then it's just evil, right? Find more companies to sue. Just make sure they are American. Don't punish your own.

This "probe" would make sense IF the US allowed American online Gambling Companies to operate, but since we have a TOTAL ban to online gambling this is just a waste of time, we are discriminating against ALL gambling companies not just EU companies,


The EU seems to need something to do since they seem to have gotten bored trying to mess with MS, instead of messing with the Fed, maybe Apple should be next, or maybe dig up some more "claims" against Intel

That is what I referred to in my earlier post. (Even things as seemingly innocious as office pools based on the NCAA Division I brackets (men's or women's) are illegal under these statutes, and if they stretch across state lines or involve crossing state lines, then wire-fraud laws are also violated. Remember, the outgoing governor of New York, Eliot Spitzer was basically *collateral damage* over an investigation of an illegal international prostitution ring for violating those same wire-fraud laws.)

(z0phi3l said @ #13)
This "probe" would make sense IF the US allowed American online Gambling Companies to operate, but since we have a TOTAL ban to online gambling this is just a waste of time, we are discriminating against ALL gambling companies not just EU companies


I agree, but it's not a total ban, just a ban on all non-chance based bets.

(theyarecomingforyou said @ #2.2)
This is about world trade rules, not US domestic policy. The US is first to kick up a stink when it comes to subsidised industries and the like in the EU and yet doesn't like it when the EU complains back. Still, when the US can bypass the Geneva Convention and torture prisoners I hardly think that they're going to give in to something trivial like online gambling.


There is a difference in torturing a German or French soldier who is simply fighting for his country and a terrorist who would not hesitate in torturing anyone (men, women, children). If the enemy is content with torture, then torturing the enemy shouldn't be an issue.

(toadeater said @ #7.2)
What laws make gambling illegal? I don't think such a law is Constitutional to begin with.


There is nothing in the Constitution that prevents a prohibition against gambling. Many states in the U.S. have laws that prohibit it. The U.S. Federal Government itself prohibits most forms of gambling across state lines. If the gambling company is located outside of the U.S., then not only state, but national lines are involved. The law does not discriminate against foreign companies, it prevents those not located in the state where the gambler is from doing that form of 'business' with him or her and, as such, prevents companies from targeting customers in states where gambling is illegal. It also prevents companies from far away from taking advantage of ignorant people who, if taken advantage of would have no recourse. If an Italian or Czech company does not like the law, all it has to do is to do business in the U.S. within the states where their customers are located.

I am not defending unfair advantages to native companies (even though this is not the case here), but is the E.U. doing anything about China, one of the most economically unfair nations in the world? Can a foreign company set up a business China? No. Not unless it wants to start a joint venture with a Chinese company.

(tiagosilva29 said @ #6.4)
Everyone should be porking the bear.


Indeed...

(C_Guy said @ #12)
Isn't it odd how the EU spends so much time worrying about American and not their own issues? Let America worry about America and try to find something meaningful to do with your day. Think up ways to spend Microsoft's money. They earned it, you stole it, so find a way to spend it. I KNOW! Use it to fund more ground-less lawsuits against successful American companies! Come on, take them down a peg! Success in business is a wonderful accomplishment.... unless you're American then it's just evil, right? Find more companies to sue. Just make sure they are American. Don't punish your own.


That's pretty funny, but i doubt that the E.U. only targets U.S. companies; those are the only ones that make the news (here).

(Semental said @ #15)
If the enemy is content with torture, then torturing the enemy shouldn't be an issue.

So it's okay to eat a cannibal for punishment? How about raping a rapist? Just because the US government defends their policy does not make is morally acceptable. Torture is torture.

Putting a cannibal (who murders someone to eat him) or rapist to death is a perfect punishment. Killing a person to eat his flesh and raping people are below human activities. Torture provides valuable information while raping or eating another person provides nothing but sick pleasure. You cannot equate torturing a terrorist with cannibalism or rape.

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