EU Says It Has Money to Salvage Galileo

In a follow-up to our previous story, Europe's proposed multibillion-dollar Galileo satellite navigation project could be salvaged with the help of unspent EU funds and without additional taxpayer money, the European Commission said today. The EU executive said it could shift money within the bloc's 2007-2013 budget to come up with the 2.4 billion euros ($3.3 billion) needed to bail out Galileo. According to EU Transport Commissioner Jacques Barrot, 2.2 billion euros ($3 billion) could be transferred from an unspent agriculture budget; 220 million euros ($305 million) could be provided from money earmarked for administration; and 300 million euros ($416 million) from the research budget. Private companies could then finance maintenance and operation of the system.

It is now up to EU member states to decide whether to accept the Commission proposal and carry on with the project, which is not expected to be up and running before 2013. EU transport ministers will debate the issue again in October.

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Oh, I'm pretty sure the N version of xp wasnt distributed the same way, I can't seem to find it almost anywhere in the stores, online or not.
As for the union taking bad steps for the market, the market itself seems to be developing stronger and stronger (car industry, mobile phones, clothing, etc) so if what you people are saying was true, wouldnt it be obvious already ? the union wasnt formed yesterday nor has it started regulating yesterday either. The union's trying to establish whats better for competition therefore the consumer, if they were trying to take care of the consumers alone, they'd force microsoft to make it cheaper for instance.
As for their way of backing up galileo, i dont see most of you complaining of how much tax payers money the us is spending on military, i'd rather have better gps than more weapons, you may not.

People will say "the DoJ" does it, but don't realize the recent decision by the EU was in the interests of protecting competitors, not competition. That difference in itself is a dangerous precedent for the EU's judiciary, and ultimately the people who wish to evolve. Scaring away successful technology is quite Darwin of them.

I absolutely hate the EU but what you're saying is it's protecting rivals from being beat by one another?

I disagree.

To use an analogy, it's taking a rival who has dosed all the rest of the drinks with dope to win the race and dosing them too so everyone is on equal footing and the best man may win.

Sure, that may be MS but let them win through having the best software out there, not by bundling everything into one and letting the ignorant masses automatically use it as a default. There's masses of software out there that beats the bundled stuff, but people don't see it because they use the default stuff.

You say "People will say DoJ". Of course they will. The US did it, the EU can't by virtue of NOT being American?

Like I said I hate the EU, but you can't blame the EU for doing EXACTLY what the US DoJ did can you?

Or they could just keep up the bogus anti-trust suits against every big company out there. I mean, they just made a quick $700mil off of MS, they just need to do that to a few other companies and they're gold.

-Spenser

stifler6478 said,
Or they could just keep up the bogus anti-trust suits against every big company out there. I mean, they just made a quick $700mil off of MS, they just need to do that to a few other companies and they're gold.

-Spenser

Maybe that's why they want to go after Intel now

stifler6478 said,
Or they could just keep up the bogus anti-trust suits against every big company out there. I mean, they just made a quick $700mil off of MS, they just need to do that to a few other companies and they're gold.

-Spenser

Agreed. It's making me hate the EU more. I can't wait for us to get out of it when the Tories come into power.

Hey as long as there are successful American companies competing in Europe the EU will find a way to steal their well-earned money and fund whatever they want.

After all, they have the consumer's best interests at heart.

Apple might want to consider reducing the iPod's popularity a little before it becomes so successful that they get a lawsuit.

C_Guy said,
After all, they have the consumer's best interests at heart.
....

Well hmmm... how come then that EU anti trust law does not ask the question - did the consumer benefit (from what might be monopolistic behavior)? US law does ask that question. EU law does not.

They have interests at heart allright... but it might not be customer's. The utter failure of XP "N" edition in Europe is a clar proof that comission is after stuff that customers do not give a crap about.