European Commission clears Microsoft to buy Nokia's smartphone business

The European Union has no problem with Microsoft buying Nokia's smartphone business. That was the decision that the Union's regulatory body, the European Commission, gave today and which will likely be the last major hurdle that needs to be cleared before the deal officially closes in the first quarter of 2014.

In their decision today, the Commission said that there were no anti-trust problems in Microsoft's plans to buy Nokia's Devices and Services business. It stated that the "overlap of the two companies' activities in this area is minimal and several strong rivals, such as Samsung and Apple will continue to compete with the merged entity." The decision follows one made by the U.S. Justice Department earlier this week which also gave its blessing for the Microsoft-Nokia deal to go forward.

When Microsoft does complete the deal to buy Nokia's smartphone business, at a cost of over $7 billion, it also means that one of its former top executives, Stephen Elop, will return to the company after previously serving as Nokia's CEO. Elop is currently scheduled to lead Microsoft's Devices team which will include all of the Lumia and Asha phone hardware that Microsoft will acquire from the Finland-based company.

Source: European Commission via The Verge | Image via Nokia

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18 Comments

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Random (maybe stupid?) question... What will be left of Nokia once Microsoft takes it's devices business?

Like... what else does Nokia do?

JaykeBird said,
Random (maybe stupid?) question... What will be left of Nokia once Microsoft takes it's devices business?

Like... what else does Nokia do?

NSN nokia solutions and network - mapping - advanced technologies and patents

Did those people really want a Nokia device with Android, or did they just say they did because they want an Android controlled market? There are dozens if not hundreds of Android device manufacturers, Google being one of them, and not one of them can make a device as good as Nokia? Sad state of the Android market if none of them can make a device that is close to a Nokia.

neonspark said,
too bad for all the people that wanted an android set from nokia. now definitively not happening.

Just curious: what would prevent Nokia to start selling Android powered smartphones in 2016?

WhatTheSchmidt said,
Did those people really want a Nokia device with Android, or did they just say they did because they want an Android controlled market? There are dozens if not hundreds of Android device manufacturers, Google being one of them, and not one of them can make a device as good as Nokia? Sad state of the Android market if none of them can make a device that is close to a Nokia.

It will be interesting to see if MS will be able to do it....

Just curious: what would prevent Nokia to start selling Android powered smartphones in 2016?

Nothing prevents them from doing it, but Nokia doesn't have much incentive to invest resources to become yet another Android vendor. At this stage, they actually have leverage against Microsoft to propel the software to play well with their hardware, since Microsoft can't afford to let them tank.

WhatTheSchmidt said,

Can't do any worse than Google did with Moto.

Which has nothing to do with MS be able to achieve the same level of success Nokia had... not surprised though.

Fritzly said,
Which has nothing to do with MS be able to achieve the same level of success Nokia had... not surprised though.

About as relevant as "what would prevent Nokia to start selling Android powered smartphones in 2016" is to the original article. Not surprised though.

WhatTheSchmidt said,

About as relevant as "what would prevent Nokia to start selling Android powered smartphones in 2016" is to the original article. Not surprised though.

It is relevant because you replied with a statement that had nothing to do with the post you were replying to; as for " "what would prevent Nokia to start selling Android powered smartphones in 2016" it was not directly related to the original article but to a comment to which was relevant.
Again not surprised.....

WhatTheSchmidt said,
Did those people really want a Nokia device with Android, or did they just say they did because they want an Android controlled market? There are dozens if not hundreds of Android device manufacturers, Google being one of them, and not one of them can make a device as good as Nokia? Sad state of the Android market if none of them can make a device that is close to a Nokia.

They wanted Nokia to make an Android device because they did not want Nokia to be thrown under the MSFT bus, which is exactly what ended up happening.

Lots of manufacturers make laptops with Windows, but most business users still prefer a Lenovo over a Dell. Doesn't mean Dell don't make decent notebooks, or that Lenovo make the best notebooks, it is just that people have a brand affinity with Lenovo, the same way they did with Nokia.

Sadly for Microsoft, this deep brand recognition still wasn't enough for many of these customers to choose a Windows Phone over an Android or iPhone. Now is that because Windows phone isn't as good as the competition, or is it becuase of the brand repulsion that Microsoft/Windows creates is the question.

recursive said,

They wanted Nokia to make an Android device because they did not want Nokia to be thrown under the MSFT bus, which is exactly what ended up happening.

Lots of manufacturers make laptops with Windows, but most business users still prefer a Lenovo over a Dell. Doesn't mean Dell don't make decent notebooks, or that Lenovo make the best notebooks, it is just that people have a brand affinity with Lenovo, the same way they did with Nokia.

Sadly for Microsoft, this deep brand recognition still wasn't enough for many of these customers to choose a Windows Phone over an Android or iPhone. Now is that because Windows phone isn't as good as the competition, or is it becuase of the brand repulsion that Microsoft/Windows creates is the question.

Like I said, there are hundreds of Android device manufacturers, but one of them is exclusive to Windows and that will not stand, they must all support Android? And if a phone starts off slow but is steadily growing, that means the brand repulses people? Android started slow, grew slowly and then quickly picked up share. Did that mean that Google repulsed people at first? And then there is you mentioning Windows (which is not part of the article, but I guess Frizly will be along soon to blame me for that soon), billions of copies sold means it repulses people? 100s of millions of copies of Win8 repulses people? If that repulses people, then Linux must be a toxin to people.

When I was a kid I had a toy called Stretch Armstrong. It was great a great toy. If only he was as good as you stretching to make a point.