Even more leaked videos show Microsoft's Kin disaster

Earlier this week, Wired posted up leaked videos that showed people testing the then-unreleased Kin phones, which were developed by Microsoft. The videos show consumers having tons of issues with the phones, but Microsoft decided to put them on sale anyway in 2010, alongside a big marketing campaign.

The Kin devices were a sales disaster and Microsoft pulled them from the market less than two months later. As it turns out, there are a ton of other behind-the-scenes videos that show strong negative reactions to the phones months ahead of the launch. Wired has posted up four more of these testing clips, once again showcasing how simple features that are difficult for the Kin to handle.

One of the videos shows the tester taking several tries just to access the Kin's main menu by tapping the screen. Yet another video shows a person having issues with deleting items, saying at one point, "It doesn’t matter which thumb I tap things with, it jiggles the screen rather than doing what I want."

Yet another video shows users having problems with the Kin's picture menu reacting to their touches. Finally, a short video shows a user discovering that trying to flip a panel on screen to the left actually causes the panel to "bounce" all the way back to the right side.

It's clear that the Kin was not working out and Microsoft would have been better off cutting its losses and cancelling the project rather than waste money and time putting it to market.

Source: Wired.com | Image via Wired

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11 Comments

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What's the point of showing flaws of testing devices of a product that never took off anyway due to other reasons? I mean, as far as I remember no one ever complained about kin's (final version) performance in reviews. What I remember though is that Verizon's expensive data plan ruined the kin. Cheap feature phone and expensive data plan just didn't mix for intended customers.

I think bringing up the Kin is interesting because it's great to see that Microsoft has stopped producing crap/mainstream flops after only a few years (Kin, Vista, WinMo, etc.) I'm really enjoying Windows 8 and am excited to see what happens with WP8.

+1... I guess I am confused - I thought we all knew Kin was a disaster for variety of reasons, and it all failed. And all this happened a while ago. What's next: a series of videos why Vista was not successful?

wow slow news day it seems if we're talking about the KIN. how about we talk about the Newton since we're on the subject of bad products? or does the author think the KIN is somewhat relevant?

These are new videos highlighting a disastrous product launch, which was largely the result of Microsoft ignoring user testing. If new videos came out about the Newton then they would also be news.

Hmmkay?

theyarecomingforyou said,
These are new videos highlighting a disastrous product launch, which was largely the result of Microsoft ignoring user testing. If new videos came out about the Newton then they would also be news.

Hmmkay?

they would be news in some remote corner of who cares land yes. But everything about the KIN is irrelevant at this point for the simple fact that it no longer exists.

theyarecomingforyou said,
These are new videos highlighting a disastrous product launch, which was largely the result of Microsoft ignoring user testing. If new videos came out about the Newton then they would also be news.

Hmmkay?

Correction: they were videos highlighting user testing several months before launch, after which the problems highlighted were fixed (as no review focused on lag, and the ones mentioning it called it 'acceptable'), for a product that mainly failed due to being priced out of reach of its target market by Verizon. Hmmkay?

There is little excuse for the timing of the release of these videos apart from to damage the credibility of Microsoft. It's a hit job, plain and simple.