Even with Vista SP1, Hackers Still Crack WGA

[quote]The fact that Microsoft has relaxed its antipiracy mechanism built into Windows Vista concomitantly with the release of Service Pack 1 failed to stop hackers from providing a crack for the latest version of Windows Genuine Advantage Validation. Various reports point out that Genuine Advantage Validation and Notifications versions 1.7.69.1 (1.7.0069.1) and 1.7.69.2 released in March 2008, following the March 18 availability of Windows Vista SP1 through Windows Update and the Microsoft Download Center, have been cracked.

The workaround is designed to be integrated with pirated copies of Windows XP and Windows Vista in order to render useless the WGA Validation mechanism. According to the reports, applying the WGA crack will permit users of counterfeit versions of Windows to access and download items from Windows Update, Microsoft Download Center and Microsoft Update. The pirated operating systems with the cracked WGA will pass all validations on Microsoft's websites and offer anything from updates to applications that are restricted to users of genuine operating systems only.

Link: Full Article @ Softpedia

Report a problem with article
Previous Story

Microsoft Surface - Set For Commercial Launch.

Next Story

Microsoft: Windows XP SP3 RTM?

50 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

The harder you try to make it the more motive (challenge) it will give to hackers and they love those things.

Instead make prices to a point that more people can afford it without looking at the alternative means.

Wait, this is news? You could download a pre-cracked Vista Ultimate SP1 before it was even generally available - that was a month ago - and yet this is FRONT PAGE NEWS?!

I know at least 3 cracks/hacks/exploits on Windows Vista SP1 Activation that have slipped through from last year.

People have even managed to take things 1 step further and have an illegally 'activated' OS, then remove the bootloader whilst still keeping activation

WGA, I think, is technically supposed to be there to stop people from being ripped off, rather than knowingly hacking their machines. For instance, someone who purchases a copy preinstalled on their machine from a computer store - if it was using a hack then they need to know about it.

Of course, those who do in fact knowingly hack their computers get caught up in it too, which is rightly so, however I don't personally think WGA was setup primarily for this.

No. Anyone that buys a system with windows preinstalled rarely pays much if anything for windows and friends who install pirated copies do so for free. M$ wants you to buy it, plain and simple; that's what WGA is for. If MS didn't lock out windows in the first place, the person who bought the computer would never know the difference whether "legitimate" or not.

+

so true...they put so much effort into preventing privacy.
i wonder if someone can make a patch or summin to strip all the drm crap outta vista? hmmm... just thinking! lol.

Don't you love how people now are claiming Microsoft didn't try to stop it, they just wanted to slow it down. Yeah right. These same people before most likely were the same ones boasting the end if piracy when Microsoft announced the steps they were going to take.

Like others have said, it does absolutely NOTHING except to annoy the paying customers. It IS a huge hassle despite anything anyone claims.

Its not like they are losing a physical object/money. So its totally pointless to even add this WGA or whatever crap. The true thief in all this is Microsoft.

Here's another "WGA is evil" story. I did the high importance security update for Vista x64, rebooted and the system said my copy was not genuine. I was convicted right there of having an illegal copy and couldn't get to my desktop. I rebooted safe mode and did a system restore and avoided those updates and it worked fine. There are a small percentage of us LEGAL users getting caught in the pirate net, MS!

no, the goal for Microsoft is not to eliminate piracy 100%. they are trying to stop average joe from using their software illegally. that is, joe goes to the internet and type vista activation crack then double clicking the exe. if they can make pirates to load up a bios dump in a hex editor and editing raw bits, they can live with that. 99.99% of windows users can't edit thier bios, but 100% of them can double click a crack.exe.

Please fix this:

The workaround is designed to be integrated with pirated copies of Windows XP and Windows Vista in order to render useless the WGA Validation mechanism.

to...
The workaround is designed to be integrated with pirated copies of Windows XP and Windows Vista in order to render the WGA Validation mechanism useless.

(Krome said @ #10)
Please fix this:

to...

thanks for the english lesson. Unfortunately your beginners class on "how to be a smart arse" gave you too little information and you've now made yourself look like an ass, when trying to look cool... FAIL

Surely there is no reason for pirating Vista, as Microsoft will let you install whichever version you like, under 30 day evaluation. Microsoft allow you to reactivate the 30 day trial period another two time, total 90 days. Microsoft will then allow you to reset the counter back to zero days, and start again.

Why does anyone too mean to buy the O/S, start messing about with BIOS hacks, when a simple "legal" registry key change will give you a "legal" evaluation version, for as long as you like :nuts:

Everything is hack-able, even apple and linux, but ms is the easiest :P
Seriously, cant they see themself that WGA fails? Legitimate users suffer from it and it doesnt stop pirates :suspicious:

(Srsly said @ #9)
Everything is hack-able, even apple and linux, but ms is the easiest :P
Seriously, cant they see themself that WGA fails? Legitimate users suffer from it and it doesnt stop pirates :suspicious:

How does it negatively affect legitimate users? So they have to install a browser plugin to download from the MS download center. Big deal.

[i]but ms is the easiest [i]

Were you not reading the front page last week? The MBA was hacked in two minutes, the Vista box hacked on the third day; Linux (Ubuntu) was not hacked. Care to retract your bull**** statement?

(RAID 0 said @ #8.2)
[i]but ms is the easiest [i]

Were you not reading the front page last week? The MBA was hacked in two minutes, the Vista box hacked on the third day; Linux (Ubuntu) was not hacked. Care to retract your bull**** statement?

However, did anyone *honestly attempt* to hack the Ubuntu laptop? The hacker community (largely running Linux and other open-source and/or no-cost operating systems, such as Free/Open/NetBSD) could very well have some sort of informal non-agression pact concerning such operating systems; such a pact would make a mockery of any challenge to hack into an open-source-OS-powered box. Leopard and Windows, of course, actually cost money, so they are fair game.

the only crack they may always work is the Bios one, if they wanted they can stop the other one that emulate the bios easily, they simply dont want to because alot of people will probably go back to xp after not cracking it after the 30 days and they want publicity and many pirates users does that

WGA is only there to stop Joe Blow from pirating Windows.
There will always be a way around any copy protection if you are determined enough.

Exactly and Microsoft knows this. They have never said WGA could beat hackers. It is intended to prevent casual copying only. In that sense, hackers shouldn't be too proud when they crack this, it's not intended to be bullet-proof.

They couldn't make it bullet proof if they wanted to.

WGA is nonsense, sure it acts as a deterant but little else and does more harm than good.

i think microsoft should just give up on this WGA thing, its nothing more than a band aid for the real problem

(C_Guy said @ #2.1)
And what would you suggest? To abandon fighting piracy completely?

no, dont give people a reason to pirate

no, dont give people a reason to pirate

Other than making Windows freeware I have no idea what you would suggest in order to do that. Don't say lower the price, because people would still pirate it if it only cost one dollar.

It really wouldn't stop it though, although I suppose it would curb it a bit. Still, look at all the cheap shareware programs that get pirated. Given a choice many people will still download a copy of a program for free as opposed to paying a few dollars for it.

I guess I'm playing the devil's advocate since I've got XP with MSDNAA, but still... If MS actually released an OS worth the money they ask for it (read: not Vista, no matter if you think it's good or bad, it's not worth the price), I would probably buy it. So, the problem isn't particularly with the price, it's with the product.

You know news is slow when Neowin starts quoting from Softpedia. I fail to see the connection between WGA and Windows Vista SP1; this article was clearly written by an idiot.

The failure is in WGA. SP1 was "suppose" to fix it so that it couldn't be pirated so easily, the same with activation. There are better things that Microsoft could be doing with their OSes instead of this waste of time and resources. They'll never stop piracy. The only ones that these measures adversely affect are legit users. Its the final reason why I dropped Vista after using it for 6 months. I'm so turned off of it that I won't even try SP1 and it seems that I have good reason not to now.

(Foub said @ #1.1)
The failure is in WGA. SP1 was "suppose" to fix it so that it couldn't be pirated so easily, the same with activation.

No it wasn't. MS only addressed two of the most widely hacks on WGA: http://arstechnica.com/journals/microsoft....ga-in-vista-sp1
Microsoft's goal is not to kill off piracy, they know that's impossible. Their goal is to make it an annoyance to pirate their software. This news is equivalent to saying that Vista is beating Leopard in sales: it's obvious and everyone knew it was going to happen, including Microsoft.

(Emil Protalinski said @ #1.2)
Their goal is to make it an annoyance to pirate their software.

The unfortunate thing is, is that all any anti-piracy mechanism does, is annoy the legitimate users.

(Fourjays said @ #1.3)
The unfortunate thing is, is that all any anti-piracy mechanism does, is annoy the legitimate users.

Exactly. These are not anti-piracy mechanisms, but rather anti-consumer mechanisms. Microsoft has unfortunately been doing a great job of alienating their customers and their industry over the last decade or so.

(Fourjays said @ #1.3)

The unfortunate thing is, is that all any anti-piracy mechanism does, is annoy the legitimate users.


I'm legitimate and it doesn't annoy me.

(RealFduch said @ #1.5)
I'm legitimate and it doesn't annoy me.

Doesn't annoy me either.

Those who I have known to have illegal copies of Windows on their PCs are not always tech savvy. They got their friend to do it for them.

Thus, WGA does cause a barrier to them, and will eventually make them fed up enough (especially with whoever installed the illegal copy) to go and buy a proper one. I've seen it happen.

Basically, don't assume all people running pirated copies of Windows do this stuff.

(Fourjays said @ #1.3)

The unfortunate thing is, is that all any anti-piracy mechanism does, is annoy the legitimate users.

quoted for truth, this thing its sometimes luck. but pirates have it 100% fail proof.

(RealFduch said @ #1.5)

I'm legitimate and it doesn't annoy me.

Didn't say it annoyed everyone all the time. What I mean is that pirates don't get any of the things that can go wrong for a legitimate user. False positives (WGA) or broken CD/DVD Drives (Starforce), for example. Why is it that it is more risky to be legit than to pirate? Should be the other way round, but it isn't.

(Kirkburn said @ #1.6)

Doesn't annoy me either.

Those who I have known to have illegal copies of Windows on their PCs are not always tech savvy. They got their friend to do it for them.

Thus, WGA does cause a barrier to them, and will eventually make them fed up enough (especially with whoever installed the illegal copy) to go and buy a proper one. I've seen it happen.

Basically, don't assume all people running pirated copies of Windows do this stuff.

Selling PCs with the Starter Edition here (Brazil), to a lot of people who don’t have access to the internet and get confused calling to activate (all the f*** time.... I'm afraid someday I'll have to kill someone.. ), when everyone I know uses the pirated version of a "genuine" Ultimate.... ... .... have to say, they are doing a great job!!!

(Emil Protalinski said @ #1.2)
Microsoft's goal is not to kill off piracy, they know that's impossible. Their goal is to make it an annoyance to pirate their software.

I think their goal is to make Windows so annoying that no one wants to use it. They're doing really well so far. WGA, UAC, and the haphazard Vista GUI are all wonderful examples of this.

(RealFduch said @ #1.5)
I'm legitimate and it doesn't annoy me.

** Furious mode on**
Good for you! It annoys me and everyone is entitled to it's own opinion right?

Recently I re-installed a legal OEM version of Windows XP on a laptop here in Vietnam but activation failed (happens often with OEM versions) and I tried to activate by phone. But surprise surprise: no toll-free phone number available in Vietnam, not even a normal one! No, Microsoft expects you to call to Singapore (yes, Microsoft expects you to call an international number in order to activate a legal bought version) because they do not take the effort to offer a local Vietnamese number.

And then you expect me to say: " I'm legitimate and it doesn't annoy me"? I will say this: "I'm legitimate and it annoys me". If Microsoft wants to reduce piracy maybe it should start be offering at least toll-free numbers for EVERY country.
** Furious mode off**

(toadeater said @ #1.10)
I think their goal is to make Windows so annoying that no one wants to use it. They're doing really well so far. WGA, UAC, and the haphazard Vista GUI are all wonderful examples of this.
lol It's certainly working well in my home!